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O Ye My People! - Nairaland / General (67) - Nairaland

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Re: O Ye My People! by isalegan2: 7:27pm On Jan 13, 2018
Olaone1:
Isale, how's Iduganran? wink wink

grin cheesy cheesy cheesy cheesy grin grin

Happy New Year, Professor Ola Olabiy!

I'm not at Iga Idunganran o. shocked cheesy cheesy cheesy

How's wherever it is you're from? tongue
Re: O Ye My People! by Olaone1: 12:30am On Jan 22, 2018
isalegan2:


grin cheesy cheesy cheesy cheesy grin grin

Happy New Year, Professor Ola Olabiy!

I'm not at Iga Idunganran o. shocked cheesy cheesy cheesy

How's wherever it is you're from? tongue
Lol

Ages now. Hope you are fine
Re: O Ye My People! by Olaone1: 12:13am On Feb 04, 2018
Where are the people who campaigned for Buhari on Nairaland? I mean members of this 'group?'

Many in here asked for the man.

My question is: how far? smiley

1 Like 1 Share

Re: O Ye My People! by AjanleKoko: 2:54pm On Feb 06, 2018
Olaone1:
Where are the people who campaigned for Buhari on Nairaland? I mean members of this 'group?'

Many in here asked for the man.

My question is: how far? smiley

Hmm.
To be honest .......Man's Not Hot. angry

2 Likes

Re: O Ye My People! by Nobody: 2:57pm On Feb 06, 2018
AjanleKoko:


Hmm.
To be honest .......Man's Not Hot. angry

It has finished. My man AjanleKoko resurfaced just to say that.

1 Like

Re: O Ye My People! by Olaone1: 1:33am On Feb 10, 2018
AjanleKoko:


Hmm.
To be honest .......Man's Not Hot. angry
Lol

Good morning bro
Re: O Ye My People! by isalegan2: 3:36am On Feb 14, 2018
‘Cheddar Man,’ Britain’s Oldest Skeleton, Had Dark Skin, DNA Shows

New York Times
By CEYLAN YEGINSU and CARL ZIMMER
FEB. 7, 2018


A likeness of “Cheddar Man,” Britain’s oldest complete human skeleton, at the Natural History Museum. Genetic evidence showed that he was dark-skinned and blue eyed, scientists said. Credit London Natural History Museum

LONDON — He had dark skin, brown curly hair and blue eyes, DNA tests suggest, upending a common assumption that Britain’s indigenous populations were all pale skinned with fair features.

He is “Cheddar Man,” Britain’s oldest complete skeleton, which was discovered in 1903 in Gough’s Cave near the village of Cheddar in Somerset, in southwest England. He lived about 10,000 years ago in the Mesolithic period, the middle part of the Stone Age.

Scientists have now reconstructed his features, demonstrating that he was part of a population of ancient Western Europeans that, scientists have shown in recent years, had dark skin. Research has shown that fair skin pigmentation — long considered a defining feature of Europe — only goes back less than 6,000 years.

The research was led by the Natural History Museum and University College London. A news release about the research was released Wednesday, but the study has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“I first studied Cheddar Man more than 40 years ago, but could never have believed that we would one day have his whole genome — the oldest British one to date,” said Prof. Chris Stringer, research leader in human origins at the Natural History Museum.
Photo
Cheddar Man, Britain’s oldest skeleton, was discovered in 1903 in southwest England. Scientists have now analyzed his ancient DNA. Credit London Natural History Museum

“To go beyond what the bones tell us and get a scientifically based picture of what he actually looked like is a remarkable and from the results quite a surprising achievement,” said Professor Stringer, who first excavated fossils at Gough’s Cave 30 years ago.

The new research shows that Cheddar Man belonged to a population known as Western hunter-gatherers, who first migrated to Europe about 14,000 years ago, he said. Today, about 10 percent of British ancestry can be linked to that population.

For decades Britons have debated over where they came from and what defines the nature of their genetic heritage.

As scientists are retrieving more DNA from ancient Britons, they are discovering how the isles received wave after wave of immigrants over tens of thousands of years.

This growing knowledge of ancient British genetics is allowing researchers to reconstruct the biology of early Britons — including their skin color.

“What may seem a truth — that people who feel British should have white skin — through time it’s not all something that is an immutable truth,” said Yoan Diekmann, a biologist at University College London who took part in the research.

Researchers studying the skin of living people have been able to determine how some variants influence pigmentation. When humans arose in Africa 300,000 years ago, recent research shows, they had a mixture of light and dark variants.

Humans first arrived in Europe from Africa about 45,000 years ago. Western hunter-gatherers migrated from the Near East much later, mostly replacing the Europeans already there.

Researchers studying a Spanish 7,000-year-old fossil first discovered that at least some Western hunter-gatherers were most likely dark-skinned and blue eyed. Later research confirmed this finding.

Until now, no one knew the affinity of Cheddar Man. The new research shows that he was part of the Western hunter-gatherer population.

“Before, we didn’t know what population lived in Britain, because we didn’t have a genome from there,” Dr. Diekmann said.

Studying a more recent skeleton, the researchers found evidence for the arrival of farmers in England, who descended from people in the Near East. These people carried some variants for lighter skin.

Researchers have found genetic variants for light skin in Sweden and elsewhere farther east dating to 7,700 years ago. Later waves of people from the Near East and Central Asia also brought light-skin variants with them. Less than 6,000 years ago, Europeans generally shifted to this new color.

Why Europeans became white, and why it happened about 40,000 years after modern humans arrived in Europe, “are all pretty much open questions,” Dr. Diekmann said.

The DNA analysis on Cheddar Man was carried out by drilling a small hole into the ancient skull and pulling out bone powder, which supplies genetic information for the facial reconstruction.

His name came from the village where he was found. Archaeologists also found bones belonging to early human cannibals in Gough’s Cave that are thought to have existed nearly 5,000 years before Cheddar Man, but their DNA profile has no direct ancestry to him even though they were found in the same place.

Still, Cheddar Man has many living relatives.

One of them still lives in Somerset, according to a 1997 DNA experiment carried out by scientists at Oxford. He was identified as Adrian Targett, a high-school history teacher, who is related to Cheddar Man on his mother’s side, the study found.

Mr. Targett could not immediately be reached for comment on Wednesday, but in 1997 when a group of tourists from Los Angeles saw a sign with pictures that explained the relationship between the two men, one of them said, “They don’t look anything alike.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/07/world/europe/uk-cheddar-man-skeleton-skin.html
Re: O Ye My People! by isalegan2: 3:53am On Feb 14, 2018
About That Song You’ve Heard, Kumbaya


The ancestors of the Gullah Geechee were brought to the southeastern U.S. from West Africa as slaves, and the hymn was a call to God to help people facing oppression. Above, a ceremony honoring those lost to the slave trade in South Carolina last year.

By JOHN ELIGON
FEB. 9, 2018
New York Times

We chant it with locked arms and closed eyes, at campfires, in protest lines and from the pews at church, but the truth is, many of us have no clue what the lyrics mean or exactly where they come from.

Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya. Kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya.

Thanks to research and lobbying by residents of a coastal community descended from slaves, the origins and meaning of “Kumbaya” have been recognized in Congress, raising hopes that a fading culture might get a boost. The song may be sung more often than usual this month, especially in the part of Georgia where its soulful lyrics are said to have originated almost a century ago.

Speaking on the House floor two months back, Representative Buddy Carter of Georgia recognized the Gullah Geechee, whose ancestors were brought to America’s southeastern coast from West Africa, as the probable creators of the famous folk song.

If you’re searching for deep meaning in the word itself, the truth, as Mr. Carter laid out in his proclamation, is that kumbaya is probably a made-up word. Still, it has come to evoke peace and harmony — sometimes mockingly so.

The first known recording of the song was made in Darien, Ga., in 1926, sung by a Gullah Geechee man named H. Wylie. The chorus was actually “Come By Here,” which in the Gullah’s Creole accent sounds like cum-by-yah. Over time, that pronunciation transformed into what we know today as kumbaya. The hymn was a call to God to come and help the people as they faced oppression.
Continue reading the main story

The Gullah Geechee, who have seen their land and way of life threatened by rising property values, now hope to use the congressional proclamation, as well as the Georgia Legislature’s recognition of “Kumbaya” as the state’s historical song, to help promote their story. An exhibition about the song is planned for this month in Darien, which sits along the 1,200-mile coastal corridor where the Gullah people settled.

“It’s significant,” said Anne C. Bailey, a historian at Binghamton University and author of “The Weeping Time,” a book about the largest slave auction in America. “It says something about the African-American tradition and the African-American contribution to the building up of the country and the world.”

Someone’s singing Lord, kumbaya. Someone’s singing Lord, kumbaya.

For decades, the dominant narrative was that a white evangelist, the Rev. Marvin V. Frey, had originally composed “Kumbaya.” This story was spread in part by Mr. Frey himself, who got a copyright on the song in 1939, claiming to have written it in 1936 based on a prayer he heard in Oregon.

Something about that story never sat right with Stephen Winick, who has a Ph.D. in folklore. For one, the song sounds like something from the African-American tradition. Mr. Winick had also heard rumors that there was an earlier recording of the song in the archives of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, where he works.

“I think it’s important to restore cultural materials to their communities of origin,” he said. “Give credit where it’s due.”

Several years ago, Mr. Winick dug up that old wax cylinder recording. It was captured in 1926 by Robert Winslow Gordon, the first head of the Archive of American Folk Song. It was the recording of H. Wylie singing “Come By Here” in an accent that sounds like “kumbaya,” a decade before Mr. Frey claimed to have written “Kumbaya.” Mr. Winick said it was possible that Mr. Frey may have heard a prayer with the kumbaya lyrics, and composed them into a song, thinking he was the first to do so. But the evidence on that remains murky.

Mr. Winick also found in the archives lyrics collected in 1926 by a high school student outside of Gullah territory for a song similar to “Come By Here.” That raised the possibility, Mr. Winick said, that the song might not have originated with the Gullah Geechee, though he maintains that it is quite possible that they could be its creators. The version of the song as we know it today very likely traces to the Gullahs because of the pronunciation of “come by here” as “kumbaya,” he said.

“I think that in the general public, if you ask someone on the street, ‘What does kumbaya mean,’ they wouldn’t know,” he said. “They would think it means joining hands and being friendly to each other.”

Someone’s laughing, Lord, kumbaya. Someone’s laughing, Lord, kumbaya.

Griffin Lotson, the Gullah historian, knew nothing of the song’s connection to his people until he started researching it in 2012, and since then he has been on something of a crusade to elevate its history.

Many Gullah Geechee, Mr. Lotson included, were conditioned to think that in order to live a successful life, they had to leave their dialect and traditions behind, he said. But now there is great interest in Gullah culture, from inside and out.

He was hired to consult on a scene in the remake of the television mini-series “Roots.” He is often called upon to give cultural tours.

Lawmakers realized the importance of preserving the Gullah Geechee culture years ago when, in 2006, Congress created the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor. The Gullah Geechee hope that the recognition of their role in the origins of “Kumbaya” will represent one step toward popularizing, and preserving, who they are.

“Gullah Geechee culture has influenced everything, from our music to the way we speak,” Heather Lorraine Hodges, the executive director of the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission, wrote in an email. “It is a foundational culture for the United States.”

Someone’s crying, Lord, kumbaya. Someone’s crying, Lord, kumbaya.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/09/us/kumbaya-gullah-geechee.html
Re: O Ye My People! by Olaone1: 1:57am On May 21, 2018
Waoh! Naijababe has deleted her moniker. What happened?! shocked shocked shocked shocked shocked
Re: O Ye My People! by wonlasewonimi: 9:43am On May 21, 2018
Olaone1:
Waoh! Naijababe has deleted her moniker. What happened?! shocked shocked shocked shocked shocked

Duh.. You didn't hear about the scandal?
Re: O Ye My People! by Olaone1: 11:50am On May 21, 2018
wonlasewonimi:


Duh.. You didn't hear about the scandal?
Scandal? Let me in on this please.
Re: O Ye My People! by wonlasewonimi: 12:02pm On May 21, 2018
Olaone1:
Scandal? Let me in on this please.

There is the story about her and oam4j having an affair. So she got pregnant and oam4j is saying it's not for him.
Re: O Ye My People! by Olaone1: 12:28pm On May 21, 2018
wonlasewonimi:


There is the story about her and oam4j having an affair. So she got pregnant and oam4j is saying it's not for him.
Link please. It should have been you na cheesy cheesy

So, you didn't go to Aberdeen? Despite your efforts on Chelsea thread? You bottled it, bro. You didn't grow enough gonads when really really needed. OAM4J must have noticed that tongue

She was clearly into you wink wink
Re: O Ye My People! by wonlasewonimi: 1:28pm On May 21, 2018
Olaone1:
Link please. It should have been you na cheesy cheesy

So, you didn't go to Aberdeen? Despite your efforts on Chelsea thread? You bottled it, bro. You didn't grow enough gonads when really really needed. OAM4J must have noticed that tongue

She was clearly into you wink wink

Who told you I didn't insert my sim card into her phone?
Re: O Ye My People! by Olaone1: 2:19pm On May 21, 2018
wonlasewonimi:


Who told you I didn't insert my sim card into her phone?
grin grin grin grin grin grin grin
Re: O Ye My People! by OAM4J: 1:06pm On Jun 05, 2018
wonlasewonimi:


There is the story about her and oam4j having an affair. So she got pregnant and oam4j is saying it's not for him.

lol you no well o. grin

Can someone remind me who metamorphosed into this wolansewonimi guy sef, I what was that his former moniker sef?; old age is catching up with me, I don forget ..lol

My people, my people... how una dey?
Re: O Ye My People! by OAM4J: 1:09pm On Jun 05, 2018
Olaone1:
Where are the people who campaigned for Buhari on Nairaland? I mean members of this 'group?'

Many in here asked for the man.

My question is: how far? smiley

Dissapointed but have no regret campaigning against Mr. Stealing is not corruption. It would have been worse.

We have to keep changing them till we get better ones.
Re: O Ye My People! by OAM4J: 1:12pm On Jun 05, 2018
wonlasewonimi:


Duh.. You didn't hear about the scandal?

But seriously, do you know the reason she deactivated her account?
Re: O Ye My People! by CptBule(m): 11:59pm On Jun 05, 2018
OAM4J:


Dissapointed but have no regret campaigning against Mr. Stealing is not corruption. It would have been worse.

We have to keep changing them till we get better ones.

Chief, complinents.



I actually don't know how to start. Because ny effort today in trying to make ends meet put me at a disad5vatange and weak state of mind.
Sir, I am a nigerian student doing a pharmaC programme in uniuyo but conflicted with school fees issue because of family issues, i am confused because my sole sponsor and dad is owed backlog of salaries by state govt.

pls help my academic life before its too late. God bless you for me.
Re: O Ye My People! by OAM4J: 6:49pm On Jun 07, 2018
OAM4J:


lol you no well o. grin

Can someone remind me who metamorphosed into this wolansewonimi guy sef, I what was that his former moniker sef?; old age is catching up with me, I don forget ..lol

My people, my people... how una dey?

My memory just rebooted... Denzel how how are you na?
Re: O Ye My People! by alphaNomega: 2:13pm On Mar 14
OAM4J:


But seriously, do you know the reason she deactivated her account?

She lost a lot of money. She is back with a new moniker though

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