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The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 - Car Talk - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Car Talk / The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 (5143 Views)

About 10 Men Sitting On A Bus On A Lekki Highway / Trip: Abuja - Enugu & Anambra, With My 605 V6 (1500 Km) / Help: My Peugeot 206 is having a BSI issue. (2) (3) (4)

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The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Ikenna351(m): 5:33pm On Jan 04, 2012
I planned to take my BABY, Peugeot 505 V6 5-speed manual, for the Xmas holiday trip to East. But I didnt trust the govt, since they had announced earlier that they may increase the price of PMS in early January 2012. Which they eventually kept their promise, with the New year gift, 1st January, 2012. Anyway, i got discouraged to use the 505 V6 for the trip, since i was yet to fix the injection issue with the car that overfuels the engine. So it would be more economical to use my 2nd car, Peugeot 605 V6 5-speed manual, for the trip. Don't get me wrong. Peugeot 605 is a great car and handles well on speed. But the 505 V6 5sp is more fun to drive when on high speed.

On 30/12/2011, I drove off the 605 V6 & headed to Enugu. After about 5 hrs hi speed drive (after Lokoja, still in Kogi state), the clutch cable broke. Hmm! It wasnt funny at all. In the middle of no where! I was angry with my self. Why? Because i did not prepare the car for the journey. In my 505, i have all kinds of wearable parts that can strand one on high way, if failed. So that i can easily replace the parts and carry on with journey. But because it was a dying minute decision to use the 605 instead ( which i recently purchased 2 months ago), i didnt have chance to purchase such parts and put in the car, such as a spare clutch cable. I was 2 or 3 kilometers away from a village i just drove past in that Kogi state. I left the car there and trecked back to the village. I got to a roadside mechanic workshop. After my explanation of what happened to the car to the mechanic, the first question he asked me was "Do I have a spare clutch cable?" I knew then that i was in for it. It was obvious to me that i would not get such car clutch cable in such a village or vicinity. And I still have another 3 or 4 hrs drive to get to Enugu city. Well, i had no option than to take the bull by the horn. Thanks to the manual transmisssion, the knowledge and experience i have in driving manual transmission without using clucth pedal.

I drove off again ( without using the clutch). It was a nightmare when i finally got to Obollo Afor and met a terrible traffic jam, icluding 9th Mile, Enugu (in that car's condition).

To cut the story short, i finally reached Enugu city by 6pm that day. I spend the night at Enugu town and the next day, i took the car to Coal Camp (Tinker) and replaced the broken clutch cable. I also bought a spare clutch cable (since I have learnt my lessons). It was after replacing the cable that i realised that i was the cause of the nightmare i had the previous day with the car. The clutch pedal became soft immediately the cable was replaced. Since i purchased the car, the clutch pedal had been so had, i mean, very hard to depress (though not as soft as my 505 V6 clutch pedal, which is hydraulically controlled, not cable, likewise, with most of the manual trans cars i have used before). So i thought that cable clutch pedals are generally very hard to depress, not knowing that the very hardnesss of the clutch pedal of the 605 was a sign that the cable was about to fail, but i ignored it. Well, i learnt my lesson in a hard way.

The reason for my story is the advantage of PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE! If i had investigated to know if it was ok for a cable controlled clutch system to be that too hard to depress, i would have known it was a sign of cable or clutch pressure plate failing and replaced the cable first, which would have fix the problem.

And the second thing to learn from the story is always ensure that you have some wearable spare parts, especially the electrical components that if failed, could render a car immobile on higway such as ignition coils, rotor, amplifier/ignition module, engine belts, spare relay, fuel pump, clutch slave cylinder master kits/rubbers or clutch cable,etc. But if you are actually the PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE type, your car will hardly strand you on long distance journey.

Ikenna.

1 Like

Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by yungboss(m): 9:46pm On Jan 04, 2012
Brother,
what a touching story,lessons learnt. Preventive maintenance is key no doubt. Thanks for sharing this with us,
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by gulfer: 9:58pm On Jan 04, 2012
@Ikenna351, you are versed in automobiles, but what happens with someone who takes his vehicle to the auto-shop for this preventative maintenance ending up with nothing done. Good story with a moral at the end. How was the consumption?
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Nobody: 10:21pm On Jan 04, 2012
Good work there, Ikenna. I once drove a '88 Audi Coupe GT from Croydon to South London with a bust clutch hydraulic master cylinder, which meant the clutch pedal was flat against the floorboards. Great fun timing the engine revs, so I could perform clutchless gearchanges without breaking the syncro hubs in the gearbox! It was a 56 mile trip too.

Any joy with locating a replacement fuel injection ECU yet?
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Ikenna351(m): 6:53am On Jan 05, 2012
@Gulfer. The car consumed only 46 litres for the 653 km journey. That makes it N3,500 worth of fuel. I was really impressed for getting such a good fuel economy from V6.

@Siena. I have made contact with someone that sells used parts (belgium) at Onitsha. He will be sending the ecu next week to me. The 605 is good but the 505 is more fun to drive on long distance. Its an amazing car. I pray & hope that the overfueling issue will soon be over. Will keep you updated.

Ikenna.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Emperoh(m): 7:00am On Jan 05, 2012
Can Ikenna or Siena tutor us on how to do this 'clutchless' manual tranny driving?

1 Like

Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by VolvoS60(m): 7:21am On Jan 05, 2012
Lion kings  grin.

The OP is indeed a brave soul to go against the grain. Old school 'lions' are gradually disappearing from the landscape so people like the OP are definitely a rare breed.

OP
I had (or should I say inherited  cheesy) a 'lion' myself some years back (1979 model 504 GL, 2000cc). Crazy electrics and thirsty, hellishly noisy engines but those cars were born survivors. Bought 2nd hand in 1991 and kept it on the road till 2010. 19 glorious years. I was surprised in the early years to find out that it had almost the same suspension layout (swing axle and trailing arms) as the W123 Mercedes Benz of that era (another indestructible workhorse). Would like to know if your 505 & 605 have the same kind of suspension?
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Ikenna351(m): 7:26am On Jan 05, 2012
@Gulfer. The preventative maintenance is not achievable by visiting auto-workshop now & then. Its YOU. First, you need to arm yourself with the car owner's manual. You need to keep to instruction in the manual, check & replace according to the instructions in the manual. You also go beyond the manual by checking stuff not mentioned in the manual. For me, i dont need the manual to tell me when to replace the brake pads. The level that the brake pedal goes down is enough for me to know the pads has worn. If the manual says "use coolant only" for the cooling system. Keep to that. Thats one of the preventative maintenance. If water is used, it will form rusty water & corrode the engine walls which will lead to overheating of engine, improper engine lubrication (because water takes longer time to warm to engine operating temperature, thereby making the engine to always run cold) & eventually engine failure. Also, ask people experienced enough to know how to tell a sign of parts failure in a car. Nearly all car parts or components give signs before they fail. You just have to look out for it, if you experienced enough to know.

Ikenna.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by gulfer: 10:52am On Jan 05, 2012
@Ikenna, tip here is really appreciated.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Nobody: 11:08am On Jan 05, 2012
VolvoS60:

I was surprised in the early years to find out that it had almost the same suspension layout (swing axle and trailing arms) as the W124 Mercedes Benz of that era (another indestructible workhorse). Would like to know if your 505 & 605 have the same kind of suspension?

The Peugeot 504 GL saloon was the only 504 that had independent rear suspension. All other models - L, GR, SR had live rear axles. The live axle was also used on all station wagons, including the GL, the live axle was carried over from the Peugeot 404.

The Peugeot 505 and old 604 had the same independent rear suspension (IRS) set-up as the 504 GL. The 505 however has twin coil springs per side though, from memory. Again, like the 504 station wagon, 505 station wagons had a live rear axle. The live rear axle was also used on most 505 sedans built in Argentina, these were poverty-spec versions, and were not built that way anywhere else, not in France or Nigeria.

The Peugeot 605 is FWD, and very different at the rear compared to the RWD models. The 505 was the last RWD model produced by Peugeot.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Nobody: 11:42am On Jan 05, 2012
Emperoh:

Can Ikenna or Siena tutor us on how to do this 'clutchless' manual tranny driving?

Clutchless gearshifts are all about engine load and revs matching. The theory is simple - with the engine off, you engage first gear, making sure the road in front is clear. Then you start the engine. The car will begin to move immediately, you accelerate gently, back off the gas sharply, and simultaneously flick the gear lever to second, accelerate hard this time, back off sharply then flick the gear lever to third etc. Each time you accelerate, and back off sharply, the load is briefly taken off the gearbox input shaft (as it would be with the engine not running) hence a gear can be selected.

Bear in mind, stopping is harder, you'll have  to accelerate, back off sharply to unload the gearbox, then pull the gear lever back to neutral before braking. Due to this, you'll have to make sure you keep a bigger gap than usual between your car and the one in front. Starting off is the same process - starting the car in first gear.


Note: This should only be used in an absolute emergency. If you miss your chance to flick the gear lever to your desired gear, because you were too late in making use of the gap between acceleration, don't force the lever! You'll have to accelerate hard again, back off sharply again to unload the gearbox to allow the shift. The window this load and unload procedure gives is very small, so your reactions must be fast. If you consistently miss the opportunity, and decide to force the gear lever into your chosen gear, you'll damage the gear syncro hubs. The syncros are what allows all forward gears to be selected smoothly, if they're damaged your forward gears will crunch when engaged (like reverse). The gearbox will still operate with damaged syncro hubs, but shifts will be rough.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Ikenna351(m): 2:30pm On Jan 05, 2012
@ VolvoS60,

I also inherited '76 504 GL from dad in my University days. The car was a "NEVER SAY DIE". The performance with the bullet-proofed engine (XN1) was so impressive that enjoyed the car till i graduated. Even after 30 years, it still had the original engine. The independent rear differential/axle in it made it a very good road handling vehicle. In fact, it was the car that made me a Peugeot man. It was that that lead my purchasing my first car, 505 V6 5-sp manual, THE KING OF THE LIONS! I love that car so much that i would do anything to keep it on the road, as long as it takes.

Ikenna.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by VolvoS60(m): 1:43am On Jan 06, 2012
Siena:


The Peugeot 504 GL saloon was the only 504 that had independent rear suspension. All other models - L, GR, SR had live rear axles. The live axle was also used on all station wagons, including the GL, the live axle was carried over from the Peugeot 404.

The Peugeot 505 and old 604 had the same independent rear suspension (IRS) set-up as the 504 GL. The 505 however has twin coil springs per side though, from memory. Again, like the 504 station wagon, 505 station wagons had a live rear axle. The live rear axle was also used on most 505 sedans built in Argentina, these were poverty-spec versions, and were not built that way anywhere else, not in France or Nigeria.

The Peugeot 605 is FWD, and very different at the rear compared to the RWD models. The 505 was the last RWD model produced by Peugeot.


^^^
Thanx 4 d info. Its a pity PSA doesn't make them like that anymore.
P.S. I meant to say W123 and not W124 in my previous post.


Ikenna351:


@ VolvoS60,

I also inherited '76 504 GL from dad in my University days. The car was a "NO SAY DIE". The performance with the bullet-proofed engine (XN1) was so impressive that enjoyed the car till i graduated. Even after 30 years, it still had the original engine. The independent rear differential/axle in it made it a very good road handling vehicle. In fact, it was the car that made me a Peugeot man. It was that that lead my purchasing my first car, 505 V6 5-sp manual, THE KING OF THE LIONS! I love that car so much that i would do anything to keep it on the road, as long as it takes.

Ikenna.

^^^
those cars really were something else. i found a big difference in the ride comfort of the (swing axle) GL, compared to that of the live axled GR. The GL's suspension was definitely in a class of its own. My one regret with that car was that we changed the "double carburettor" (as it was called then cheesy) to a single chamber carburettor because we were told the double carbs were exceptionally heavy drinkers. i wish we had kept the original carb instead.

those were the days. . .
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Nobody: 2:22am On Jan 06, 2012
VolvoS60:

those cars really were something else. i found a big difference in the ride comfort of the (swing axle) GL, compared to that of the live axled GR. The GL's suspension was definitely in a class of its own. My one regret with that car was that we changed the "double carburettor" (as it was called then cheesy) to a single chamber carburettor because we were told the double carbs were exceptionally heavy drinkers. i wish we had kept the original carb instead.
those were the days. . .

Replacing the twin-venturi Solex carburettor with a single actually made fuel consumption worse. The GL had a higher compression engine (different pistons) and was a larger capacity version of the XN1 engine fitted to the L, GR and SR models. The GL was 1,970cc versus the smaller 1,796cc variant, it was less efficient with a single carb. With a single venturi Solex, you actually drove with a wider throttle angle to achieve the same speed the twin reached with a narrower throttle opening.

My mom owned a '78 Peugeot 504 GL Sedan back in the day. Hers was the original French import, identified by green tinted glass versus the later PAN models, that had brown tints. The French versions also had chrome "Peugeot" and "GL" badges at the rear versus the black plastic ones on PAN models. PAN models also lost the classic chrome "504" on the front panel that the French cars all had. French cars had different front seats - the headrests were recessed when pushed fully down, PAN models had the same front seats as the GR / SR.

I have fond memories of my escapades in my mom's 504 GL. Brilliant handling, good brakes too - all GL sedans had rear disc brakes, common today, but quite rare back then. L, GR, SR and all station wagons had the more basic drum brakes at the rear.

Pure nostalgia!
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by blank(f): 8:19am On Jan 06, 2012
I am trying to get a 407. Hope it handles d same as u guys have said about Peugeot.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Ikenna351(m): 8:57am On Jan 06, 2012
@Blank. If I were you, I would go for 406. 406 is more rugged & handles better than the 407. But since you are a lady, the two 406 qualities i mentioned above might not matter, since i believe you are after moblity: point A to point B, might not be interested in driving pleasure.

But you should know that Peugeot seized to be Peugeot after the production of 505 stopped in 1992. That is, you cannot compare Peugeot RWD cars produced which stopped with 505 & FWD Peugeots produced from 405 till date.  the gap in the difference is so wide. But one thing common with all Peugeots (both RWD & FWD) is their good road handling qualities. They are one of the best brands in designing good chassis that ensures good road handling. You should also know that Peugeot produced a unique Shock absorber which was Patented, used from 504s, which are rebuildable, unlike other brands. I wouldnt know if their recent products (406 & 407) have rebuildable shocks.

Ikenna.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by VolvoS60(m): 8:17pm On Jan 07, 2012
i see my fellow lionistas are still in full force on this thread swapping war stories. grin

i have not heard the name 'Solex' in years.

Brings back memories of the names of other peugeot parts. Do any of the following names ring a bell:


Exide (batteries)
Ferrodo (brake pads)
Eyuum (or Equum or whatever the hell the name was cheesy) (spark plugs)
Cogefa (contact sets)
Automotor (a variety of parts)
purflux (oil filters)


any others, gentlemen?
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by oblo(m): 8:36pm On Jan 07, 2012
My broda s60!! Where did u dig those names up from? I sure do remember those names! My dad had his 504 Gl shipped in directly from France, boy was it a machine then! I still remember boasting to mai peers about the "double carburretor" ! Can I ever forget reading the owners manual over and over again and even taking it to school , if only to show off? Can I ever forget the stunts I pulled wit that ride ever? My elder bro and I used to play pranks on each other so either of us takes the car out without Mums knowledge! Let's keep the memories pouring in please for the loyal beasts of way back!
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Ikenna351(m): 8:51pm On Jan 07, 2012
@ VolvoS60. You forgot to mention Valeo. Remember Valeo clutch plate, distributor condenser & rotor,etc.

Also about the spark plug, its Equem (I think so).

Ikenna.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Nobody: 9:32pm On Jan 07, 2012
VolvoS60:

Exide (batteries)
Ferrodo (brake pads)
Eyuum (or Equum or whatever the hell the name was cheesy) (spark plugs)
Cogefa (contact sets)
Automotor (a variety of parts)
purflux (oil filters)

any others, gentlemen?

Chausseur (radiator).
Paris-Rhone (alternator, starter motor).
Ducellier (distributor).
Veglia (instrument cluster).
Jaeger (instrument cluster).
Delco-Remy (ignition system - points, rotor arms etc).
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Nobody: 9:40pm On Jan 07, 2012
The stunts I pulled to take that car to school! I remember disconnecting the feed to the coil (terminal 15) so the car wouldn't start. I would leave for school, hide round the corner with my pals. I would watch my mom trying to start the car, then she would eventually give up, and share a car to work with my dad.

Then I would rush back home, dig out my spare key (yes, I had one cut for my personal use wink) plug back the coil, fire up and myself and my pals would drive to school. I remember during break time, we would cruise into UNIBEN, Ugbowo Campus (with change of clothes) and chase the girls there. Those were the good old days, my college was pretty much opposite UNIBEN, Ugbowo.

Or we would go tearing along Benin-Lagos Expressway. Of course, school was out way before my parents finished work, so the car would be back home, and the engine cooled by the time they were home. cool

More escapades to come. cool
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by 989900: 8:58pm On Jan 08, 2012
The stunts I pulled to take that car to school! I remember disconnecting the feed to the coil (terminal 15) so the car wouldn't start. I would leave for school, hide round the corner with my pals. I would watch my mom trying to start the car, then she would eventually give up, and share a car to work with my dad.

Then I would rush back home, dig out my spare key (yes, I had one cut for my personal use ) plug back the coil, fire up and myself and my pals would drive to school. I remember during break time, we would cruise into UNIBEN, Ugbowo Campus (with change of clothes) and chase the girls there. Those were the good old days, my college was pretty much opposite UNIBEN, Ugbowo.

Or we would go tearing along Benin-Lagos Expressway. Of course, school was out way before my parents finished work, so the car would be back home, and the engine cooled by the time they were home.

More escapades to come.


"Bad-o" and I thought I was a bad boy.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by VolvoS60(m): 12:23am On Jan 13, 2012
Those were good times, sirs. Good times.

You guys are something else. The names Valeo and Jaeger brought a smile to my face. I had also tried and tried to remember that awful sounding cheesy name of the radiator (Chausseur) to include in my list but my memory just couldn't do it. I also remember having a Walker exhaust for the centre (& rear?) pots - not sure if that was factory fitted OEM or whether it was an aftermarket part I had fitted myself - this was so, so long ago.

Can anyone remember the name of the headlight cover (and the entire unit?) i think it began with an "m". I did replace a few of those during the lfetime of the car. I also remember the shiny reflective coating of the parabola shaped headlight units that I bought were never quite as good as the factory fitted OEM ones.

Getting genuine spare parts was a real challenge back then. The only parts available in the markets were poorly made and poorly packaged/labelled parts. A standing joke among my friends and I then was the labelling on the (clearly fake) cheesy purflux oil filters - filters we had no choice but to buy back then. The labelling read "fabrique en Franch" grin or something like that. I believed then (and I still do now) that Nigeria has extraordinarily high volumes of sub-standard autoparts that will not pass properly conducted quality standards tests. I still remember the shock I felt when I saw someone with servicing parts purchased from some Francophone country way back in the day - well made, well packaged/labelled OEM parts which you wouldn't be scared to use on your pride and joy.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by VolvoS60(m): 1:04am On Jan 13, 2012
Ikenna,

Seeing pictures of your lion reminded me of the 505 "Evolution" of the 80s. I remember the stir one caused when it sped past the school compound and we all raced out to catch a glimpse. Rear spoilers and front and rear skirts were a magical thing to behold back then grin (at least to our unschooled eyes).

Ah . . . the sorrows of lion ownership. Peugeots of those days were definitely something else. I remember lengthy battles the 'rewire' had with the electrics of my car - the alternator and cut-out must have had the DNA of French public sector employees embedded in them - there were days when they just REFUSED to work, no matter what anyone did to coax them back to life. I also had to learn the peculiar language of the mechanics regarding bits of trim as well as other mechanicals. Its been almost 3 decades and I still can't figure out why some window parts were called "winding glass" and "engine glass" cheesy - their strange names may have been the reason why they had to be replaced nearly every other week. sad Not to talk of the car part called the "boris" grin ( I first heard that in a mechanic's workshop in the late 80s). Does anyone have any idea what a 'boris' is? tongue Other best forgotten memories of my lion ownership include routinely injuring my fingers on rusty, jagged wheelarches while washing the car sad. Not pleasant at all.


But the joys. . .ah . . . the joys. The criminally cold airconditioning, guaranteed to cool you down come what may. Once you saw the condensation on the A/C vents, then you knew you wouldn't have any problems. wink. The knowledge that no matter where you had a breakdown, somebody somewhere, would know how to get your lion roaring again. grin The sound of the noisy cooling fans which somehow grew on me. . .And of course, that sublime, supremely comfortable GL suspension.

Lions 4ever.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Nobody: 2:11am On Jan 13, 2012
..[i].[/i]It was Fabrique en France.

The Peugeot 504 engine was the first engine I pulled to rebuild, as a teenager (my VW Beetle 1302 S was the first). The 504 was also the first car I got to grips with air conditioning. The air-conditioned GL had a different sump - aluminium, with lugs the compressor bolted to. And once these cars cruised by, the whine from the aircon fan gave it an air of affluence. You knew it had aircon alright! cool

Lovely sound from that engine - better when you fitted the optional 8-blade fan, as opposed to the regular 6-blade one. cool
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Tinyemeka(m): 5:15am On Jan 13, 2012
VolvoS60:

Its been almost 3 decades and I still can't figure out why some window parts were called "winding glass" and "engine glass" cheesy - their strange names may have been the reason why they had to be replaced nearly every other week. sad Not to talk of the car part called the "boris" grin ( I first heard that in a mechanic's workshop in the late 80s). Does anyone have any idea what a 'boris' is? tongue Other best forgotten memories of my lion ownership include routinely injuring my fingers on rusty, jagged wheelarches while washing the car sad. Not pleasant at all.



The "Boris" you talk about is actually Ball bearings. The mechanics shortened it to Boris.

"Winding glass" is manually operated car window, while "engine glass", referred to automatic windows. A rare option at that time.

I didn't have the opportunity of sampling any of the Old School Peugeot models. Ours was an '84 Volkswagen Passat. LOL
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by halfcurrent(m): 8:11am On Jan 13, 2012
nice posts smiley
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Jodesky(m): 3:57pm On Jan 18, 2012
Does anyone recall the 'plunger' in the steering column. The smoothness of the turning of the steering depends largely on the looseness or tightness of the plunger and I mastered it to the extent that the mechanics became my foes. I then started making some little dough from effecting minor repairs on my own like turning the contact set to get the desired gap and achieve ignition. Or raising or reducing the ignition level. All I prayed then was for Dad to tell me to take the car to the mech for such minor faults. I wld just go to a corner and fiddle with some of the components and with a responsive car like the 04, I mostimes succeded in making money.

Then you can adjust the accelerator cable to achieve desired softness and speed. Can just go on and on.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Ikenna351(m): 5:36pm On Jan 18, 2012
The reliable, durable, impressive & rugged nature of 504 GL was what led to the 505 production. Peugeot realised how good 504 GL was and decided to redesgned the body only. It had all the 504 GL mechanicals (except that some 505 mechanicals parts were longer in length 505 like the rear camber, drive shafts, etc). 505 was an improvement on 504, but was not better than 504 GL. The foreign assembled 504 GLs had the best comfortable front seats better than the 505s. Even when i converted the 504 GL to 505, i kept the 504 front seats in our village. Just couldnt let go. Very comfy! The later 504 GLs assembled in Nigeria had the 505 front seats. Though ok, but not as comfy as the foreign 504 GLs.

Ikenna.
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by pak: 11:17pm On Jan 18, 2012
Hi Ikenna,

How did you know the ECU was faulty ?

Does a Diagnostic tool bring that up ?

My car has been consuming fuel like crazy for a while and with this fuel price increase/scarcity its driving me nuts.

I did a scan while back though I cant remember the codes, the mech said nothing related to the fuel consumption came up.

I mean it presently does 224Km on 1/2 tank (33.5l) thats like 6.8km/l compared to your ride that did over 14km/l.


I just need an urgent solution else might consider selling


I use a honda accord '03 (EOD).

and where r u based bros ? (sounds as though you'r based in the north)
Re: The Journey With My Peugeot 605 V6 On Abuja - Enugu Highway On 30/12/2011 by Somatic(m): 1:36am On Jan 19, 2012
Have fond and not so fond memories of peugeot. Just like @siena, my dad owned a 1977/78 504 GL, the 1 with recessed headrests sans aircon tho. He loved that car to death and many times refused to use other vehicles in the house even tho the vehicle often took him to emeka mechanic and oga rewire. Remember how I warned (more like begged) him not to use the car to pick me up from school (heck we had a couple of LRs, & better Peugeots). Lo and behold, see the olive green thing (unique color too) at the school grounds, the annoying horn blaring and my Dad with mischief all ova his face calling me. See shame that day. He loved the ride greatly and despite Mums nagging refused to sell or give it away. When he passed on (God bless his soul) Mum as the new oga did not hesitate to dispose of the thing. A cousin of dad was glad to receive it. Presently, my dad's impeccable 504, our green car is in shambles. Has caught fire twice and is an array of different car panels but still manages to run on the same engine that came with it. We were not pleased and mum even considered repossessing the vehicle buh we advised aganist such. Reading this thread brings back memories. We all learned to drive in that car. Till now I don't really feel comfortable with power steering.

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