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What Is Your Career Path? by mycvclinic: 9:08pm On Jan 10, 2012
Hello Everyone,

I really need to hear from the house about Career Path.

Doing CV reviews, I have received emails with messages as follows (I have simply done a cut and paste of these messages and haven't changed anything);

‘My career path is banking industry and telecommunications’
'I am looking for a job in the telecoms or oil and gas sector'
'I am looking for a job in a bank'
'I am looking out for any multi national organisation or oil & gas etc'
'I intend working in the Construction  industry'
'I'm looking for job in an oil and gas coy'
'I will do any kind of job'
'I’m interested in d telecoms industry'

Whenever I come across messages of this nature, I immediately wonder if perhaps most of us are unable to get jobs because we have not figured out exactly "what I want to do".

If you look closely at those message excerpts listed above, you will notice one thing in common - these individuals have stated the 'Where I want to work' and not 'What I want to do'.

"What I want to do" relates to your profession (Solicitor, Accountant, Journalist, Architect, Engineer, Marketer etc). By identifying what you want to do, you have essentially identified the most important component of your Career Path.

In other words, Career path is mainly about what you do (or want to do) and NOT where you work (or want to work).

I believe it is more productive to focus on what you want to do rather than focusing on where you want to work. Focusing on what you want to do will enable you cave out a focused career. Also, this enables you to develop the core skills and professional qualification/certification/training that is required for a Career in your chosen field. By so doing, you have succeeded in laying the foundation that is necessary for you to achieve progression in your chosen profession.

On the other hand by focusing on where you want to work, you stand the risk of accepting jobs that take you away from your career path and away from your area of interest and competence.

If you tell me 'I want a job in a bank' I will immediately wonder, what is it you want to do in a bank. Banks can hire people from different professions such as IT, Finance and even Law.

However if you said, I am interested in developing a career in IT or I want a career in Finance etc, my next enquiry will be to check your skills and competences in your area of interest eg. what professional qualifications do you have, how many years of work experience do you have in this field etc

You can see there is a huge difference between these approaches. When you focus on what you want to do, your options become clearer. You'll find yourself applying for jobs based on your abilities and most importantly, you'll notice and take up opportunities to improve yourself in order to achieve a very balanced career with well rooted foundations (which leads to progression).

Always remember that recruiters give jobs to those with the necessary skill and competence to carry out the job and NOT to those with merely an interest in working in such a place.

Do you know your Career Path?

3 Likes

Re: What Is Your Career Path? by yamakuza: 7:56am On Jan 11, 2012
Waiting for comments, especially per the last sentence above.
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by mirob(f): 4:30pm On Jan 11, 2012
₪☺τ̅ really, I want to make career ion any field I found ‎​♍Ɣ self,therefore I'm flexible in ‎​♍Ɣ career choice. Mainwhile I'm a graduate of History and International studies and your input would be higly welcomed.
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by iice(f): 5:44pm On Jan 13, 2012
Hmmmm
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by yamakuza: 6:05pm On Jan 13, 2012
iice:

Hmmmm


^ thats ur path? undecided
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by iice(f): 6:11pm On Jan 13, 2012
Yup
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by tanimola22: 6:29pm On Jan 13, 2012
mycvclinic:

Hello Everyone,

I really need to hear from the house about Career Path.

Doing CV reviews, I have received emails with messages as follows (I have simply done a cut and paste of these messages and haven't changed anything);

‘My career path is banking industry and telecommunications’
'I am looking for a job in the telecoms or oil and gas sector'
'I am looking for a job in a bank'
'I am looking out for any multi national organisation or oil & gas etc'
'I intend working in the Construction  industry'
'I'm looking for job in an oil and gas coy'
'I will do any kind of job'
'I’m interested in d telecoms industry'

Whenever I come across messages of this nature, I immediately wonder if perhaps most of us are unable to get jobs because we have not figured out exactly "what I want to do".

If you look closely at those message excerpts listed above, you will notice one thing in common - these individuals have stated the 'Where I want to work' and not 'What I want to do'.

"What I want to do" relates to your profession (Solicitor, Accountant, Journalist, Architect, Engineer, Marketer etc). By identifying what you want to do, you have essentially identified the most important component of your Career Path.

In other words, Career path is mainly about what you do (or want to do) and NOT where you work (or want to work).

I believe it is more productive to focus on what you want to do rather than focusing on where you want to work. Focusing on what you want to do will enable you cave out a focused career. Also, this enables you to develop the core skills and professional qualification/certification/training that is required for a Career in your chosen field. By so doing, you have succeeded in laying the foundation that is necessary for you to achieve progression in your chosen profession.

On the other hand by focusing on where you want to work, you stand the risk of accepting jobs that take you away from your career path and away from your area of interest and competence.

If you tell me 'I want a job in a bank' I will immediately wonder, what is it you want to do in a bank. Banks can hire people from different professions such as IT, Finance and even Law.

However if you said, I am interested in developing a career in IT or I want a career in Finance etc, my next enquiry will be to check your skills and competences in your area of interest eg. what professional qualifications do you have, how many years of work experience do you have in this field etc

You can see there is a huge difference between these approaches. When you focus on what you want to do, your options become clearer. You'll find yourself applying for jobs based on your abilities and most importantly, you'll notice and take up opportunities to improve yourself in order to achieve a very balanced career with well rooted foundations (which leads to progression).

Always remember that recruiters give jobs to those with the necessary skill and competence to carry out the job and NOT to those with merely an interest in working in such a place.

Do you know your Career Path?





This is a reflection of the fact that most people went to school because they wanted to graduate and work for banks, oyel companies, telecoms and what have you. It is as simple and lucid as that, nothing more.  

It is unfortunately doleful that our society does not help matters. Everyone has been brainwashed into believing that working for the aforementioned industries, without necessarily having a career path or set goals or even knowing what to do sef, is the way to go.

Orientations have to change. How many of our universties have courses that teach students how to think productively? I am not talking about the productivity crap they teach at economics departments. I am talking about well tailored courses that teach students how to think and act productively, as is required in the real world. We need to start the change from here. More HR companies must form an alliance with our universities to help channel this. I believe HR managers have a lot of value to add in this regard.

Truly yours,
T22
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by Chinks(m): 12:00pm On Jan 14, 2012
nice topic[color=#006600][/color]
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by mycvclinic: 11:37pm On Jan 16, 2012
@T22,

You have very relevant points! Thank you for such an enlightening reply.

I am beginning to believe that there is a lack of information on careers available to our students/graduates. As a result of this lack, there is a disconnect between talent/skill and interest. This is dangerous as such scenario will normally lead to a burnout and/or  poor quality of work output.

It seems that at the university level (in Nigeria), allot of emphasis is placed on passing exams and the purpose of learning appears to have been lost in the process. I am not saying examinations are not important, they are very important, but we need to strike a balance between learning and practice; skills are developed where this balance is struck.

Industrial Training and NYSC schemes appear to have been developed to promote practice and skill development but again the attention has moved away from practice and back to what appears like a form of examination (just non-written). Even from the way some people list NYSC and IT experiences on their CV, it's as if they were letting you, the reader, to know "Yes, I have done it, please give me a job now".

The next question then is 'What skills?' If information on career/profession is available, it will follow that information of necessary skills will be available.

Career = What do you do
Skill = How do you do it

If you lack the skills required for a particular profession/career, you certainly don't have a career. Career and skill go hand in hand.

I have witnessed a graduate of Economics interview for a position as a truck driver. No joke! I was shaken. He had his reasons which included the unavailability of jobs.
I immediately wondered;
- What type of job has he been looking for?
- Does he have the necessary skills to carry out such jobs?
- Has he considered other options? There are allot of options for an Economics graduate if he/she has developed some skills.
- Has he gone for interviews but failed to convince the recruiter that he posses those skills?
- Is he simply looking for a quick fix? (unwillingness to painstakingly invest in his career development)

What has this got to do with career path?
I understand that the employment situation in Nigeria is challenging (I have been there too) and that is the more reason why it is essential to be focused. You can NEVER develop core skills required for a particular career if you choose the approach of putting your eggs in many baskets.
When you choose the approach of making yourself an available candidate for diverse careers/professions, you are indirectly choosing to develop diverse skills. This is unrealistic and in my opinion is not plausible.
The career path driven individual will instead focus on development of core skills and as his/her career progresses, other skills will be developed. .
(The saying, 'jack of all trades, master of none' comes to mind).

It appears that most people assume that a career path will restrict them.
I believe a career path helps you focus on developing certain skills - core skills. Also, there are always other related paths in which these skills can fit.

I wish I could hear from someone that believes a career path is restrictive and why you think so. . .

1 Like

Re: What Is Your Career Path? by Jenifa1: 11:44pm On Jan 16, 2012
well, I think the problem arises partially from our preoccupation with money.
career, to us, is not an end in itself but a means to an end i.e money and material goods.

people don't follow the paths that will lead to self-fulfillment and productivity.
instead they follow the path they feel lead to quick cash.

nobody wants to build industrial or academic skill. all we want to do is build our bank accounts.
our learning is not for the sake of learning. but for the sake of what job or money it will bring us.
I mean it's good to have money in mind. but too much of everything is bad.

to me, the only people who successfully make use of career well in Nigeria are pastors. you can tell these people are very dedicated to their work. so much in fact. and they have nurtured the skill to make heaps of money out of it. . . of course at the expense of gullible followers.
there are so many pastors around you KNOW that the competition is fierce and only the most dedicated and skillful will rise to the top.
and you can tell that these successful pastors will still be pastors if they didn't make money from it. you know their life is centered around their work. and they sincerely believe that they are doing the right things. not that I agree with their messages though.lol

if only we could channel the talents and interests of more people into other, and even more productive, industries.

to me this is one of the main arguments for capitalist economy as opposed to the state-monopoly economy that we have in nigeria (aka oil, gas, contracts, telecom etc). where skill and talent doesn't matter for making money. but luck and connections.
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by AjanleKoko: 1:19pm On Jan 17, 2012
Hmm, well . . . what can I say?

First of all, it's not a bad thing to be preoccupied with money. Money is the reason why we all work, no matter what we tell ourselves. Unless if you happen to be a national of Saudi, the UAE, Kuwait, or Qatar. They don't have to work for money, and in most cases do not. For the rest of us, we need to work, be creative, innovative, cram, swot, or whatever, all in the bid for self-actualization.

Unfortunately, in most cases in Nigeria, there is no defined career path for most disciplines. This is primarily due to the largely undeveloped nature of our economy, a largely state-run mono-economy. That is why there is so much noise about oil workers. Sometimes you see posts on this section, asking how a botanist can pursue an oil and gas career. Not surprising, since oil seems to be the only route to prosperity in Naija. Though I agree with Jenifa's comment on pastors grin

I think everybody has said what needs to be done. For the individual, the only thing I can say is, try to be the best you can be in whatever you are doing. Most times we have choices made for us; take what you have and run with it. Take the best choices available, don't settle for less. Keep improving on your previous achievements, and you'll surely find success.
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by mycvclinic: 8:44pm On Jan 17, 2012
Ok so the money issue came up. I view money in a totally different way and I don't spend much time writing about money, I honestly don't know why (I'm an accountant and I believe you have to consider money).
In my opinion, a balance needs to be struck between many factors and money is just one of those factors, it shouldn't be the only factor used in making a decision on career choice.

@Ajanlekoko, please I need you to throw more light on this. . .
AjanleKoko:


Unfortunately, in most cases in Nigeria, there is no defined career path for most disciplines. This is primarily due to the largely undeveloped nature of our economy, a largely state-run mono-economy.

I maintain that what we truly lack is the knowledge of the career opportunities available to various disciplines and within various professions, industries  etc. This results in job seekers clinging on to the most popular job titles out there without considering suitability (interest and skill mix.
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by Sammy79(m): 4:03pm On Jan 20, 2012
Career Path is quite important and cannot be over-emphasized if one wants to arrive at success in a particular field. Like I have said in my recent post before I was re-directed to this thread, the Nigerian situation is VERY unique, making Career Path issue almost non-existent. The following are realistic factors we could debate upon but I encourage us to proffer solutions/suggestions where we can:

1. How many graduates today learnt about Career Counseling  during their undergraduate days?(new generation graduates might have)- our foundation of learning needed to have been redirected as far back as the late 80's to reflect emerging realities. Rather focus has been on grades and studying 'marketable' courses. This in itself was a fall-out of regressing economy, social development and growing corruption in the system.

2. Because of failing national economy and poor development, focus has shifted from following passion and self-fulfillment( which is the foundation to establishing Career Path) to survival!- but it seem some people are fast realizing (in their old age) that they have made wrong choices in pursuit of money whilst sacrificing their passion.

3. How many Nigerian graduates today can confidently refuse to apply for a prospective job opening or decline a job offer simply because it does not align with their Career Path?- Unless may be the support system around the individual is strong ( financially etc). Mind you, with the present global economic realities, even the Western and European graduates seem to be having fewer choices.

4. Whilst excellent CV and interviews would go a long way in securing a dream-job, has it always been the case in Nigeria? I refer to nepotism on the one hand and divine providence on the other (both seem to be the greatest factor shaping 'Career Path' in Nigeria).

5. Have we considered how lopsided and less fragmented is the nature of the Nigeria employment market? There seem to be more promising opportunities for careers in engineering, medicine and a few social sciences ( Accounting etc) more than any other professions. What about pure sciences and Art majors? Yes, one might argue that a graduate of History or Bio-Chemistry, for example, who wants to develop their career in this path, should go for it but considering factors 1-3 above, a lot of graduates are not rewarded up to the minimum requirement (where they can fend for themselves and build a future for their families) for which they can even survive! So many a 'forced' to opt out in pursuit of better opportunities.

My conclusion is that whilst it is good to concentrate on building an excellent CV and developing astute interview skills, you may find yourself landing the dream job mainly either due to the God-factor (divine providence) or nepotism ( man-know-man). Your smart CV is just a step in the whole nine-yard and if you get 'lucky' or 'favoured' along the way, then can Career Path 'emerge' for you. Otherwise, consciously developing and maintaining a Career Path is VERY far from the reality and almost non-existent in Nigeria. At least, not in the present decadence that the country is in.

My Advice (from experience)

1. Understand and acknowledge the hand of providence first (believe in God and His ability to make all things possible). Don't make the mistake of rusting in your CV but do your best to make the CV smart off course.

2. Find your path (from Passion to Career choice through counseling and divine guidance). Some would never have access to career counseling but all should have access to divine guidance.

3. Its never too late to re-trace your footsteps if you think you have missed it.

4. PATIENCE- I consider this very very important in making your next move, especially if you are tempted to move away from your career/life dreams for ANY reason.

5. Self-evaluate your progress ( self-development is important in this area, no matter how slow the progress might be just keep going).

6. NEVER compare yourself with another person's career path/growth- staying focused is the key.

7. Find the courage to be thankful to God at each step of the way.

2 Likes

Re: What Is Your Career Path? by PROVENSOLUTION: 3:53pm On Dec 17, 2013
Career path have something to do with the way one is wired by God. It is a function of ones personality and aptitude. Interestingly despite the importance of knowing ones career path. Many have unconsciously chosen to beat about the bush. Instead of taking SWOT TEST OR securing the service of professional. Interestingly this service have been made very simply by provensolutions. Where one need only to download their questionnaire from www.provensolutions.com.ng/visibilityservice. Take and mail same to them via nmc@provensolutions.com.ng
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by AjanleKoko: 7:18pm On Dec 17, 2013
mycvclinic:
@Ajanlekoko, please I need you to throw more light on this. . .


I maintain that what we truly lack is the knowledge of the career opportunities available to various disciplines and within various professions, industries  etc. This results in job seekers clinging on to the most popular job titles out there without considering suitability (interest and skill mix.

LOL....Taken me almost two years to throw more light grin

Are there really career paths available within various industries in Nigeria? undecided
In my world, I constantly come across people who try to seek opportunities within the corporate environment wherever they are available.
Essentially that means you got into, say a telco, into the call center, and after a few years of doing the same thing with no movement, start looking to move to other departments, for reasons of promotion, or sometimes just the need for a change.

This has happened to me as a well: I started my career as a software engineer, later a business analyst, and then a product manager. Though I consider myself to be fortunate, as my movements were basically opportunistic and logical progressions. Most people in Nigeria seek job changes desperately, usually because they run out of options where they are, and become stagnant.

The reason why that happens is simple: most 'careers' are dead-ends. No organic evolution of the job roles, no real exposure, no flexibility. And trust me when i say the reason is that most businesses in Nigeria are at the lower end of the pyramid; just struggling to stay alive, not really innovating and growing. If the economy was dynamic, and there was true growth, that wouldn't be the case.

My experience as a software engineer in the 90s was that the industry was way too small, there were too few viable companies to move to, and very few companies invested in technology beyond the basics. Hopefully that has changed a bit now, but only just a bit. Compare that to the UK, for example, where everything is basically tech-driven. In 2000, Microsoft and the UK government started this project with BizTalk, which was all about e-government and automating all the government processes. The project was so big that they employed programmers from just about everywhere. I can personally attest to a dude who quit a job in Shell Nigeria to relocate to the UK. He got a job with Microsoft from Nigeria!

Imagine doctors in Nigeria abandoning the profession in droves! We can't even incentivize doctors to stay employed as doctors, it is that bad! embarassed

One positive I have seen in recent years is the willingness of settled 'companymen' like myself to ditch the corporate ladder and try their hands on enterpreneurship. It started when a lot of peoples' hands were forced by redundancies in the financial sector, and now I see more and more people opting out to do their own thing. Also, I see people quitting the MNC heavyweights to join startups: two of my colleagues moved from relatively secure and well-paying jobs at our MNC telco, to online startups. At least, options are being created, people just need to be more proactive and take responsibility for their futures.

3 Likes

Re: What Is Your Career Path? by esere826: 10:17pm On Dec 17, 2013
^^
Well said
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by mbulela: 11:12pm On Dec 19, 2013
AjanleKoko:



One positive I have seen in recent years is the willingness of settled 'companymen' like myself to ditch the corporate ladder and try their hands on enterpreneurship. It started when a lot of peoples' hands were forced by redundancies in the financial sector, and now I see more and more people opting out to do their own thing. Also, I see people quitting the MNC heavyweights to join startups: two of my colleagues moved from relatively secure and well-paying jobs at our MNC telco, to online startups. At least, options are being created, people just need to be more proactive and take responsibility for their futures.

Oga, your phone just dey ring off the hook and you no dey reply my calls.
Wetin happen?
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by AjanleKoko: 4:16pm On Dec 20, 2013
mbulela:

Oga, your phone just dey ring off the hook and you no dey reply my calls.
Wetin happen?

I must not have saved your number when I made the pense from BB 10. Abeg text me with your new number and/or BB PIN.
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by amosade30(m): 6:31pm On Dec 21, 2013
Pls I nid sm1 wu cn teach me autocad,ms word and excel veri wel,or sm1 we can practice 2geda..lag onli..tnx
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by MaryBlair2019: 8:45am On May 21, 2019
Making a career path in advance is an important thing for everybody. If you are a graduate of a university and you haven’t compiled a career path yet, then I recommend you work as managing or senior editor about this work you can read on the site https://jobsforeditors.com/managing-editor-job-description.html on which there are ma,e managing editor descriptions, and many senior editor descriptions. Why do I recommend working as a managing editor or as a senior editor for people who have not drawn up a career development plan? Because work as an editor involves many prospects that can be realized in the near future.
Re: What Is Your Career Path? by Suvenia: 5:19pm On May 21, 2019
Can you imagine a world without techies? Whew, unimaginable! Get the "eat, sleep, code, repeat" hoodie for techies today.

Perfect gift for a techie, along side the "JavaScript" hat. And if she is not too much of a techie, the "Wonder Woman" sweatshirt should come in handy as a great gift.

Re: What Is Your Career Path? by newspapers: 6:58am On Aug 02

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