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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Goztino(m): 9:11am On Dec 10, 2019
Xup everyone. It's few days to Christmas and I wish you all the best.

Germany is indeed a very good country and I keep falling in love with it daily.


Has anyone changed from a masters program to a Bsc program in a totally different department here?
If yes, send me a PM let's discuss.

1 Like

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by RealFirstLady(f): 6:49pm On Dec 10, 2019
Goztino:
Xup everyone. It's few days to Christmas and I wish you all the best.

Germany is indeed a very good country and I keep falling in love with it daily.


Has anyone changed from a masters program to a Bsc program in a totally different department here?
If yes, send me a PM let's discuss.

Same masters people are fighting for you are here running from it. Hmm... inside life grin
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Energygod: 6:53pm On Dec 10, 2019
RealFirstLady:


Same masters people are fighting for you are here running from it. Hmm... inside life grin


Na real inside life o grin grin
I'm sure he got good reasons tho
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by BelieverDE: 8:47pm On Dec 10, 2019
Goztino:
Xup everyone. It's few days to Christmas and I wish you all the best.

Germany is indeed a very good country and I keep falling in love with it daily.


Has anyone changed from a masters program to a Bsc program in a totally different department here?
If yes, send me a PM let's discuss.

Why do you want to switch program, Goztino? cry

Why do you want to jettison your program for a Bsc in Germany?

How about you transfer to RWTH Aachen University? Your course of study- Applied Geophysics is a joint Master's program with ETH Zürich (Switzerland) and TU Delft (Netherlands).

Be an active member in EAGE (European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers) as well as other associations -SEG and SPE. SEG now receives applications for her Travel Grant to attend the SEG international conference and this is open to graduate students. Apply for it and broaden your horizons; connect with Researchers and top guys in the industry. If your passion is not anything related to the oil and gas industry, you could still find yourself opportunities in the Geothermal Energy Resources in Germany. Geophysicists also find themselves opportunities in the telecommunication industry due to their programming skills.


If I may ask, why do you want to switch your program?
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Goztino(m): 2:54am On Dec 11, 2019
BelieverDE:


Why do you want to switch program, Goztino? cry

I actually studied Geophysics and I plan on contacting you and Basalt when the time is right.

Why do you want to jettison your program for a Bsc in Germany?

How about you transfer to RWTH Aachen University? Your course of study- Applied Geophysics is a joint Master's program with ETH Zürich (Switzerland) and TU Delft (Netherlands).

Be a active member in EAGE (European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers) as well as other associations -SEG and SPE. SEG now receives applications for her Travel Grant to attend the SEG international conference and this is open to graduate students. Apply for it and broaden your horizons; connect with Researchers and top guys in the industry. If your passion is not anything related to the oil and gas industry, you could still find yourself opportunities in the Geothermal Energy Resources in Germany. Geophysicists also find themselves opportunities in the telecommunication industry due to their programming skills.


If I may ask, why do you want to switch your program?

Nice points.
First of all, I have not said I want to switch over to BSc program, I just asked if anyone has done it but honestly I am thinking towards that direction, I have already booked an appointment with the career advisor department in my school and the outcome of the appointment will finalize my thought. As you already know, I am currently in RWTH doing the Applied Geoscience MSc program and everything is moving perfectly well because I flow with the lectures and I make money too (I am just over 2 months in Germany). I understand the courses and I am aware of the joint geophysics program which is only 1,000 Euros per semester in case you don't know.
That's apart.
Now coming to your question why do you want to switch to a BSc course
I think of switching to BSc in computer science or information engineering or electrical and electronics engineering this time in a university of applied science which is more practical oriented and encompasses long period compulsory internship programs in their studies.
In the university of applied science, they are not deep into research and theories, they are deep into practical and train students for the industry. I am someone that wants to work in the industry and won't like doing a Ph.D. without any work experience after Msc.
Here in Germany, companies don't care much about your good result, they care about your skills and internship experience is highly indispensable in your CV while seeking for employment in the industries. Now most Geology students graduate without going for internships because there are very few companies who advertise for internships for Geologists. In fact, honestly, there are very few companies who need the services of Geologists in Germany unless your area of specialization is Engineering Geology which unfortunately is all done in the German language. If you think I am not saying the truth, you can do a quick research about it using your computer or asking those that have graduated in any German university.
Geologists have much opportunities in countries with abundant mineral resources and crude oil like Nigeria, Australia, America, Canada, Norway, Saudi Arabia and even at that, getting into the oil industry is not always easy because most Geology graduates want to work there thereby making entry very competitive.
You made mention of going to conferences and getting a connection with those already in the industry, now let me ask you a question and I want you to be honest with me.
I am happy you are a Geologist too, how many connections did you make during NAPE conference in Nigeria that gave you job? Here in Germany, they don't have much oil. They are more into manufacturing and production. I know you will say what of Canada, UK, and America? You can as well go there and search for jobs?
The fact remains that doing MSc in a different country and getting job in another country is very very difficult because you need a resident permit of that country and even a work permit to get job there. Now, how will you be in Germany and get a resident permit and work permit of Canada and USA for them to offer you jobs?

Are there no graduates from that country who are ready to fill the limited vacancy?
Why should they leave those graduates to employ someone without a resident and work permit? Unless you are the only one that has what they need which is not always the case.
Most people here in most courses start another MSc programs just to continue staying in Germany but to me instead of doing multiple MSc upon Msc, I rather save the energy and start in a field that won't make me do so many Msc just to hang around on the fence. I know some are unemployed because of inability to speak the language up to B2 level but the fact still remains that in some departments you don't have to battle much before landing a professional job.
Getting a part time job is easy but getting a professional job-ready to pay you up to the needed amount for your Blue card (Permanent residency) is not easy to come about especially for a Geologist.
You should know that without a professional job here you don't have a root unless you marry a German.
If I may ask, why do you want to switch your program?
I am thinking of building a career in a field that has unlimited opportunities everywhere in the world in other to have a high probability of getting a professional job offer that will enable me to process my permanent residency after graduation and not start doing another masters in the same course with the aim to continue staying in Europe
The decision is not yet concluded until I visit the career advice department, they have already given me an appointment for that after writing to them
CC
RealFirstLady

For a better idea of what is going on in most cases read the below article though I must confess the guy exaggerated it when he brought racism into it.
https://www.nairaland.com/5185821/should-move-uk-return-nigeria

10 Likes 5 Shares

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by odimbannamdi(m): 7:25am On Dec 11, 2019
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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by RealFirstLady(f): 7:54am On Dec 11, 2019
Goztino:


Nice points....
CC
RealFirstLady

For a better idea of what is going on in most cases read the below article though I must confess the guy exaggerated it when he brought racism into it.
https://www.nairaland.com/5185821/should-move-uk-return-nigeria


Serious matter shocked
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by 0yewale(m): 8:15am On Dec 11, 2019
Goztino:


Nice points.
First of all, I have not said I want to switch over to BSc program, I just asked if anyone has done it but honestly I am thinking towards that direction, I have already booked an appointment with the career advisor department in my school and the outcome of the appointment will finalize my thought. As you already know, I am currently in RWTH doing the Applied Geoscience MSc program and everything is moving perfectly well because I flow with the lectures and I make money too (I am just over 2 months in Germany). I understand the courses and I am aware of the joint geophysics program which is only 1,000 Euros per semester in case you don't know.
That's apart.
Now coming to your question why do you want to switch to a BSc course
I think of switching to BSc in computer science or information engineering or electrical and electronics engineering this time in a university of applied science which is more practical oriented and encompasses long period compulsory internship programs in their studies.
In the university of applied science, they are not deep into research and theories, they are deep into practical and train students for the industry. I am someone that wants to work in the industry and won't like doing a Ph.D. without any work experience after Msc.
Here in Germany, companies don't care much about your good result, they care about your skills and internship experience is highly indispensable in your CV while seeking for employment in the industries. Now most Geology students graduate without going for internships because there are very few companies who advertise for internships for Geologists. In fact, honestly, there are very few companies who need the services of Geologists in Germany unless your area of specialization is Engineering Geology which unfortunately is all done in the German language. If you think I am not saying the truth, you can do a quick research about it using your computer or asking those that have graduated in any German university.
Geologists have much opportunities in countries with abundant mineral resources and crude oil like Nigeria, Australia, America, Canada, Norway, Saudi Arabia and even at that, getting into the oil industry is not always easy because most Geology graduates want to work there thereby making entry very competitive.
You made mention of going to conferences and getting a connection with those already in the industry, now let me ask you a question and I want you to be honest with me.
I am happy you are a Geologist too, how many connections did you make during NAPE conference in Nigeria that gave you job? Here in Germany, they don't have much oil. They are more into manufacturing and production. I know you will say what of Canada, UK, and America? You can as well go there and search for jobs?
The fact remains that doing MSc in a different country and getting job in another country is very very difficult because you need a resident permit of that country and even a work permit to get job there. Now, how will you be in Germany and get a resident permit and work permit of Canada and USA for them to offer you jobs?

Are there no graduates from that country who are ready to fill the limited vacancy?
Why should they leave those graduates to employ someone without a resident and work permit? Unless you are the only one that has what they need which is not always the case.
Most people here in most courses start another MSc programs just to continue staying in Germany but to me instead of doing multiple MSc upon Msc, I rather save the energy and start in a field that won't make me do so many Msc just to hang around on the fence. I know some are unemployed because of inability to speak the language up to B2 level but the fact still remains that in some departments you don't have to battle much before landing a professional job.
Getting a part time job is easy but getting a professional job-ready to pay you up to the needed amount for your Blue card (Permanent residency) is not easy to come about especially for a Geologist.
You should know that without a professional job here you don't have a root unless you marry a German.
If I may ask, why do you want to switch your program?
I am thinking of building a career in a field that has unlimited opportunities everywhere in the world in other to have a high probability of getting a professional job offer that will enable me to process my permanent residency after graduation and not start doing another masters in the same course with the aim to continue staying in Europe
CC
RealFirstLady

For a better idea of what is going on in most cases read the below article though I must confess the guy exaggerated it when he brought racism into it.
https://www.nairaland.com/5185821/should-move-uk-return-nigeria


The insight you have managed to gathered in just your less than three months is what the person in the link at the end of your post arguably missed during his days in DE. I know it is not easy to make sharp decisions like this one you are about to make but regardless of what the counselor will tell you (he or she will most likely advise from a German perspective), you have already discovered your truth, just GO FOR IT.

The advise I personally give to people (new students) nowadays is, if you are not studying anything related to "Informatics", just make sure you get to at least B2 or B1 level before you graduate, to even stand a chance unless your plan is PhD or to move to another country. I have more than enough friends that are doing or have done second MSc. Because your most important skill in Germany is the language, just that it is less important for IT jobs (not that it is not).

My few advise here (personal opinion though):
1. if age is still on your side (maybe < 25yrs), go for the BSc, the process is largely the the same as stated by the schools you are going (just that Visa hustle is out of it.) If you consider age to not really be on your side, with the evolution of Industry 4.0 - a fusion of informatics to other (engineering) areas, which is a very big topic in Germany. You might be able to get a MSc program that fuses both your Engineering/Geo with IT .. and you learn along (might be tough but also worth it). If you put in the work, you can still nail at least an IT entry role after your study.

A former colleague (A Medical Dr.), we met at a Health-Tech company, took the Medical Informatics MSc in Deggendorf and still works as a Data Scientist there. I (Chemical Engineer) even though with previous experience as a Software Engineer in NG before coming to DE had to switch to IT related program(Digital Engineering MSc) - after 'investing' two semesters studying MSc Chemical Engr. before "my eye open" which has now led me to IT positions in few of the biggest firms in DE .. during and after my study.

So, if you search very well, you might be able to get something along that line as a lot of such programs are popping up and if you take/have online IT tutorials and certifications (programming, data analysis etc.) that can aid your application.

2. I saw that you mentioned Electrical and Electronics Engineering as option... biko, I am begging you to not consider that at all (it is largely same same...) ..if you are going to make the switch... kuku ma go Informatics straight o.. unless you have it in mind to have your B2 before you finish your program.

3. When you are choosing your school, if possible prioritize the one(s) in or closer to states/cities with growing startup ecosystem .. they have more low hanging entries than where you have more of the big German coys.

(not really sure about your insinuation about this part but..)
Permanent Residency is a function of your contributions: tax, social, welfare etc. to the system and because if you are earning enough to get a Blue Card, that contributions will be better and faster and that is why you can get your PR faster with Blue Card than someone holding the normal residence. Also, the earning requirement for Blue Card is not the same across all profession e.g for IT is about 53k or so while for Scientist/Researchers is about 40k and for IT .. you will need about 3 yrs working experience to earn up to that (personal evaluation though).

Best wishes in whatever conclusion you arrive at.

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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by MarkGud(m): 10:43am On Dec 11, 2019
Goztino:
Xup everyone. It's few days to Christmas and I wish you all the best.

Germany is indeed a very good country and I keep falling in love with it daily.


Has anyone changed from a masters program to a Bsc program in a totally different department here?
If yes, send me a PM let's discuss.

I have same thought after i went for job seminar where companies sent representatives and in all I noticed 70% if not more of the companies represented searched for candidates in I.T field for opportunities ( full time jobs, internship, working student etc). It got to me that opportunities abound in IT sector in Germany. Also, I know a couple of naija guys in my Uni undergoing their 2nd MSc and I felt why do MSc upon MSc instead of switching to a more 'marketable' field. I engaged some of them and feedback was "doing BSc again? & considering the duration". I seriously have asked the pros and cons of doing such and no concrete progress made. I hope someone with a broad view helps out and leme know the out come after u have met the advisory council. Regards
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Goztino(m): 11:34am On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


The insight you have managed to gathered in just your less than three months is what the person in the link at the end of your post arguably missed during his days in DE. I know it is not easy to make sharp decisions like this one you are about to make but regardless of what the counselor will tell you (he or she will most likely advise from a German perspective), you have already discovered your truth, just GO FOR IT.

The advise I personally give to people (new students) nowadays is, if you are not studying anything related to "Informatics", just make sure you get to at least B2 or B1 level before you graduate, to even stand a chance unless your plan is PhD or to move to another country. I have more than enough friends that are doing or have done second MSc. Because your most important skill in Germany is the language, just that it is less important for IT jobs (not that it is not).

My few advise here (personal opinion though):
1. if age is still on your side (maybe < 25yrs), go for the BSc, the process is largely the the same as stated by the schools you are going (just that Visa hustle is out of it.) If you consider age to not really be on your side, with the evolution of Industry 4.0 - a fusion of informatics to other (engineering) areas, which is a very big topic in Germany. You might be able to get a MSc program that fuses both your Engineering/Geo with IT .. and you learn along (might be tough but also worth it). If you put in the work, you can still nail at least an IT entry role after your study.

A former colleague (A Medical Dr.), we met at a Health-Tech company, took the Medical Informatics MSc in Deggendorf and still works as a Data Scientist there. I (Chemical Engineer) even though with previous experience as a Software Engineer in NG before coming to DE had to switch to IT related program(Digital Engineering MSc) - after 'investing' two semesters studying MSc Chemical Engr. before "my eye open" which has now led me to IT positions in few of the biggest firms in DE .. during and after my study.

So, if you search very well, you might be able to get something along that line as a lot of such programs are popping up and if you take/have online IT tutorials and certifications (programming, data analysis etc.) that can aid your application.

2. I saw that you mentioned Electrical and Electronics Engineering as option... biko, I am begging you to not consider that at all (it is largely same same...) ..if you are going to make the switch... kuku ma go Informatics straight o.. unless you have it in mind to have your B2 before you finish your program.

3. When you are choosing your school, if possible prioritize the one(s) in or closer to states/cities with growing startup ecosystem .. they have more low hanging entries than where you have more of the big German coys.

(not really sure about your insinuation about this part but..)
Permanent Residency is a function of your contributions: tax, social, welfare etc. to the system and because if you are earning enough to get a Blue Card, that contributions will be better and faster and that is why you can get your PR faster with Blue Card than someone holding the normal residence. Also, the earning requirement for Blue Card is not the same across all profession e.g for IT is about 53k or so while for Scientist/Researchers is about 40k and for IT .. you will need about 3 yrs working experience to earn up to that (personal evaluation though).

Best wishes in whatever conclusion you arrive at.

Thanks for your wonderful response.
I am not less than 25yrs, I am 29.
I am also currently enrolled for German course alongside my studies. Well my final decision on that will be taken this year.

2 Likes

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by 0yewale(m): 11:39am On Dec 11, 2019
MarkGud:


I have same thought after i went for job seminar where companies sent representatives and in all I noticed 70% if not more of the companies represented searched for candidates in I.T field for opportunities ( full time jobs, internship, working student etc). It got to me that opportunities abound in IT sector in Germany. Also, I know a couple of naija guys in my Uni undergoing their 2nd MSc and I felt why do MSc upon MSc instead of switching to a more 'marketable' field. I engaged some of them and feedback was "doing BSc again? & considering the duration". I seriously have asked the pros and cons of doing such and no concrete progress made. I hope someone with a broad view helps out and leme know the out come after u have met the advisory council. Regards

You have 10 years to study as a foreign student in Germany the last time I checked. A BSc will take you an average of 2.5 - 4 years (pretty sure you won't be doing studienkolleig), Unless you have already used 3 years to study MSc and still want to do PhD, so most time, people still have enough time. If you have the grit, you can even finish earlier ...and if the BSc is even IT, you will gather enough work experience before you graduate to make smooth transition into the main employment market. Personally, the only con I know is the "shame" attached, that is if you care though..

The issue here is our mentality, you left Nigeria for MSc, completed or half way done ...only to now switch to another BSc. .. you sef reason am.. how e go sound for ear? how you go take table am for friends/families back at home(in NG)? but the reality is, your life is your life, every other thing/body will follow you as soon as you take any decision. Switching, terminating or pausing programs is kinda new to our culture as it looks like failure but I know of non-Nigerians, Germans that have done each of the three.


If you are making a switch to IT.. you should prioritize applied science schools though..

4 Likes 1 Share

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Goztino(m): 11:43am On Dec 11, 2019
MarkGud:


I have same thought after i went for job seminar where companies sent representatives and in all I noticed 70% if not more of the companies represented searched for candidates in I.T field for opportunities ( full time jobs, internship, working student etc). It got to me that opportunities abound in IT sector in Germany. Also, I know a couple of naija guys in my Uni undergoing their 2nd MSc and I felt why do MSc upon MSc instead of switching to a more 'marketable' field. I engaged some of them and feedback was "doing BSc again? & considering the duration". I seriously have asked the pros and cons of doing such and no concrete progress made. I hope someone with a broad view helps out and[b] leme know the out come after u have met the advisory council. Regards[/b]
Alright, I will meet her by 11am on 17th December and will share with you the outcome

1 Like

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Goztino(m): 11:46am On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


You have 10 years to study as a foreign student in Germany the last time I checked. A BSc will take you an average of 2.5 - 4 years (pretty sure you won't be doing studienkolleig), Unless you have already used 3 years to study MSc and still want to do PhD, so most time, people still have enough time. If you have the grit, you can even finish earlier ...and if the BSc is even IT, you will gather enough work experience before you graduate to make smooth transition into the main employment market. Personally, the only con I know is the "shame" attached, that is if you care though..

The issue here is our mentality, you left Nigeria for MSc, completed or half way done ...only to now switch to another BSc. .. you sef reason am.. how e go sound for ear? how you go take table am for friends/families back at home(in NG)? but the reality is, your life is your life, every other thing/body will follow you as soon as you take any decision. Switching, terminating or pausing programs is kinda new to our culture as it looks like failure but I know of non-Nigerians, Germans that have done each of the three.


If you are making a switch to IT.. you should prioritize applied science schools though..

This guy is smart.
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Goztino(m): 12:00pm On Dec 11, 2019
Anybody in any of these four schools and programs?

1. Computer Science
(Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences)
2. Information Engineering
(Hamburg University of Applied sciences)
3. Computer Science
(ULM University of Applied sciences)
4. Communication and Information Engineering
(Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences)
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by MarkGud(m): 1:16pm On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


You have 10 years to study as a foreign student in Germany the last time I checked. A BSc will take you an average of 2.5 - 4 years (pretty sure you won't be doing studienkolleig), Unless you have already used 3 years to study MSc and still want to do PhD, so most time, people still have enough time. If you have the grit, you can even finish earlier ...and if the BSc is even IT, you will gather enough work experience before you graduate to make smooth transition into the main employment market. Personally, the only con I know is the "shame" attached, that is if you care though..

The issue here is our mentality, you left Nigeria for MSc, completed or half way done ...only to now switch to another BSc. .. you sef reason am.. how e go sound for ear? how you go take table am for friends/families back at home(in NG)? but the reality is, your life is your life, every other thing/body will follow you as soon as you take any decision. Switching, terminating or pausing programs is kinda new to our culture as it looks like failure but I know of non-Nigerians, Germans that have done each of the three.


If you are making a switch to IT.. you should prioritize applied science schools though..




Thanks alot and to add what Goztino already observed, you are super smart and your advice; sooo on point.

@the bolded, this is my 3rd month in Germany, studying advanced materials analysis (course is a deviation from what I anticipated and research oriented) in a sch in the east of Germany with no student job prospect whatsoever. So u can imagine the scenario.

As for "shame" ish, me no care as it's my life, my career and I hope I make best decisions for myself now that I am some months old in German. I really don't care even if it's BSc path I re-route to now I have the opportunity and chance. Except there are IT MSc programs that are non consecutive for a Materials and Metallurgical Engineering BSc degree holder like myself then fine. (If you know any as such kindly let me know).

U mentioned considering unis close to or in cities/states with growing ecosystem, can you mention a few of the cities and also likely Informatics prog I should consider.

1 Like

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by MarkGud(m): 1:24pm On Dec 11, 2019
Goztino:

Alright, I will meet her by 11am on 17th December and will share with you the outcome

Alright bro. Thanks
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Braket: 1:39pm On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


You have 10 years to study as a foreign student in Germany the last time I checked. A BSc will take you an average of 2.5 - 4 years (pretty sure you won't be doing studienkolleig), Unless you have already used 3 years to study MSc and still want to do PhD, so most time, people still have enough time. If you have the grit, you can even finish earlier ...and if the BSc is even IT, you will gather enough work experience before you graduate to make smooth transition into the main employment market. Personally, the only con I know is the "shame" attached, that is if you care though..

The issue here is our mentality, you left Nigeria for MSc, completed or half way done ...only to now switch to another BSc. .. you sef reason am.. how e go sound for ear? how you go take table am for friends/families back at home(in NG)? but the reality is, your life is your life, every other thing/body will follow you as soon as you take any decision. Switching, terminating or pausing programs is kinda new to our culture as it looks like failure but I know of non-Nigerians, Germans that have done each of the three.


If you are making a switch to IT.. you should prioritize applied science schools though..



Everything you have said so far makes sense.
But can I ask why you don't count electronics engineering as IT? Is it because of how it sounds?
How does getting work experience before graduation works? Most of schools that offer IT bsc courses aren't in big cities so that's another limitation.
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by 0yewale(m): 2:55pm On Dec 11, 2019
Braket:

Everything you have said so far makes sense.
But can I ask why you don't count electronics engineering as IT? Is it because of how it sounds?
How does getting work experience before graduation works? Most of schools that offer IT bsc courses aren't in big cities so that's another limitation.
I suggested counting out EE because even though very related, from friends that are studying it here:
1. The program is not under computer science or informatics faculty.
2. The few that I know are more of the hardware part of IT than the software part.
3. Most don't offer more than a module for core IT courses and they might even be the elective module.

If you will agree with me, it is the software part (Software/Information Engineering, Data Science/Analytics/Engineering, Design etc. ) of IT that is HOT all over the world.

If you are wondering about what this means, the three points I mentioned determines the type of faculty members(Professors) the program will have (access to), which determines the type of research(group) they have, which determines the type of companies they are collaborating with and thereby determines what they will teach you as well as how they will teach. Can also determines the type of jobs you will be exposed to and might get during and after your study.
e.g a senior lecturer (not even a Prof.) taking a Big Data course, after a class said he is looking for interns for a project (which his company his working on), many people applied and he took-in not less than 10 and the number reduces along the line and I know not less than 2 that continue to work with him in full time capacity after graduation. So, you also have to play the game of possible availability of opportunity and that was why I also mentioned applied science schools earlier.

For a foreign student, ways to gather work experience while studying that I know about are: Internships, Research Assistants (or Tutoring), Research Placements, Working Student and short-term professional work. Each with different requirements (skill and expertise).

You do not really need to be in the big cities, just that the proximity might helps in nailing down the aforementioned experiences, especially if your German language is not yet smooth. The good thing (from my experience), no employer discriminates against schools so far you have what it takes to do whatever they need you for.

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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by 0yewale(m): 3:18pm On Dec 11, 2019
MarkGud:


Thanks alot and to add what Goztino already observed, you are super smart and your advice; sooo on point.

@the bolded, this is my 3rd month in Germany, studying advanced materials analysis (course is a deviation from what I anticipated and research oriented) in a sch in the east of Germany with no student job prospect whatsoever. So u can imagine the scenario.

As for "shame" ish, me no care as it's my life, my career and I hope I make best decisions for myself now that I am some months old in German. I really don't care even if it's BSc path I re-route to now I have the opportunity and chance. Except there are IT MSc programs that are non consecutive for a Materials and Metallurgical Engineering BSc degree holder like myself then fine. (If you know any as such kindly let me know).

U mentioned considering unis close to or in cities/states with growing ecosystem, can you mention a few of the cities and also likely Informatics prog I should consider.

The issue with the bridge MSc I mentioned is that it might really require much of your time to learn a lot of things as fast as possible especially if you have ZERO programming experience before but people dey run am successfully, you might just have to reduce your falafolo and increase your focus to 110% ..else I will advise the BSc route.

However, you can checkout these programs and if you need further clarification, just write the program coordinator, e nor dey hurt them, its their job. cheesy
1. https://www2.daad.de/deutschland/studienangebote/international-programmes/en/detail/5587/
2. https://www2.daad.de/deutschland/studienangebote/international-programmes/en/detail/4775/#tab_detail
3. https://www2.daad.de/deutschland/studienangebote/international-programmes/en/detail/5587/#tab_detail

The core growing tech ecosystem that I know are Munich, Berlin, Hamburg, Koln and Dusseldorf. There are jobs in other cities too but might be difficult to get if you are not really skilled and with good German. See, on paper Kiel is far to Berlin but in reality boys dey school dere dey run Internship/Working students in Berlin ... it is just a worthy price to pay for the experience and I have heard student semester ticket in NRW is quite good to navigate the state.

I might not be able to suggest BSc courses for you but i think you can use these points to evaluate whichever you see.

1. What are the focus areas of the program, do they sound like what you want to do after study.
2. Is the program in the faculty of Computer Science/Informatics
3. What are the research groups present in the faculty, are the groups (Professors) working on something exciting to you.
4. Do the program offer compulsory internship (it helps if they also help with placement)
5. How many companies are the professors(faculty) working with and how interested are you in that intersection .. e.g a lot of Professors work with VW/BMW but not all are doing autonomous driving..
6. If you have time, you can also profile their alumni to gauge their after school move.. you can do same for the Professors..to see, if they run their own company or institute (fact.. most do)
7. It will be a plus ..if a Nigerian is studying same course or have ..

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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by vickyboiy: 6:01pm On Dec 11, 2019
Nobody is even talking about the health courses available abi na only IT courses Dey germany
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by fieryy(f): 8:05pm On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


You have 10 years to study as a foreign student in Germany the last time I checked. A BSc will take you an average of 2.5 - 4 years (pretty sure you won't be doing studienkolleig), Unless you have already used 3 years to study MSc and still want to do PhD, so most time, people still have enough time. If you have the grit, you can even finish earlier ...and if the BSc is even IT, you will gather enough work experience before you graduate to make smooth transition into the main employment market. Personally, the only con I know is the "shame" attached, that is if you care though..

[b]The issue here is our mentality, [/b]you left Nigeria for MSc, completed or half way done ...only to now switch to another BSc. .. you sef reason am.. how e go sound for ear? how you go take table am for friends/families back at home(in NG)? but the reality is, your life is your life, every other thing/body will follow you as soon as you take any decision. Switching, terminating or pausing programs is kinda new to our culture as it looks like failure but I know of non-Nigerians, Germans that have done each of the three.


If you are making a switch to IT.. you should prioritize applied science schools though..





This is unfortunately the sad truth, but honestly there's no reason of anybody, who plans on going that route to be ashamed.
I personally was impressed. It's not easy to make that kind of decision, especially when you are in your late twenties. They might even have to combine their studies with work.
Seriously, I could neeeever. I don't know how you guys do it, but respect!

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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by MarkGud(m): 8:22pm On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


You have 10 years to study as a foreign student in Germany the last time I checked.

Thanks alot Chief, and for the time you used in clarifying things. For the bolded, how do I confirm current stance.

If you dont mind, I wish to PM you.

1 Like

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by willy2000(m): 8:38pm On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


The insight you have managed to gathered in just your less than three months is what the person in the link at the end of your post arguably missed during his days in DE. I know it is not easy to make sharp decisions like this one you are about to make but regardless of what the counselor will tell you (he or she will most likely advise from a German perspective), you have already discovered your truth, just GO FOR IT.

The advise I personally give to people (new students) nowadays is, if you are not studying anything related to "Informatics", just make sure you get to at least B2 or B1 level before you graduate, to even stand a chance unless your plan is PhD or to move to another country. I have more than enough friends that are doing or have done second MSc. Because your most important skill in Germany is the language, just that it is less important for IT jobs (not that it is not).

My few advise here (personal opinion though):
1. if age is still on your side (maybe < 25yrs), go for the BSc, the process is largely the the same as stated by the schools you are going (just that Visa hustle is out of it.) If you consider age to not really be on your side, with the evolution of Industry 4.0 - a fusion of informatics to other (engineering) areas, which is a very big topic in Germany. You might be able to get a MSc program that fuses both your Engineering/Geo with IT .. and you learn along (might be tough but also worth it). If you put in the work, you can still nail at least an IT entry role after your study.

A former colleague (A Medical Dr.), we met at a Health-Tech company, took the Medical Informatics MSc in Deggendorf and still works as a Data Scientist there. I (Chemical Engineer) even though with previous experience as a Software Engineer in NG before coming to DE had to switch to IT related program(Digital Engineering MSc) - after 'investing' two semesters studying MSc Chemical Engr. before "my eye open" which has now led me to IT positions in few of the biggest firms in DE .. during and after my study.

So, if you search very well, you might be able to get something along that line as a lot of such programs are popping up and if you take/have online IT tutorials and certifications (programming, data analysis etc.) that can aid your application.

2. I saw that you mentioned Electrical and Electronics Engineering as option... biko, I am begging you to not consider that at all (it is largely same same...) ..if you are going to make the switch... kuku ma go Informatics straight o.. unless you have it in mind to have your B2 before you finish your program.

3. When you are choosing your school, if possible prioritize the one(s) in or closer to states/cities with growing startup ecosystem .. they have more low hanging entries than where you have more of the big German coys.

(not really sure about your insinuation about this part but..)
Permanent Residency is a function of your contributions: tax, social, welfare etc. to the system and because if you are earning enough to get a Blue Card, that contributions will be better and faster and that is why you can get your PR faster with Blue Card than someone holding the normal residence. Also, the earning requirement for Blue Card is not the same across all profession e.g for IT is about 53k or so while for Scientist/Researchers is about 40k and for IT .. you will need about 3 yrs working experience to earn up to that (personal evaluation though).

Best wishes in whatever conclusion you arrive at.

The bolded is not absolutely correct, the minimum wage for getting a blue card is 41k if your job falls within what is termed Mangelberuf
They basically check if what you studied and your job is in this category.
Applying for a niederlassung(permanent residency) requires you to have at least B1, this can be issued after 18months after getting the blue card.

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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by odimbannamdi(m): 8:57pm On Dec 11, 2019
0yewale:


You have 10 years to study as a foreign student in Germany the last time I checked. A BSc will take you an average of 2.5 - 4 years (pretty sure you won't be doing studienkolleig), Unless you have already used 3 years to study MSc and still want to do PhD, so most time, people still have enough time. If you have the grit, you can even finish earlier ...and if the BSc is even IT, you will gather enough work experience before you graduate to make smooth transition into the main employment market. Personally, the only con I know is the "shame" attached, that is if you care though..

The issue here is our mentality, you left Nigeria for MSc, completed or half way done ...only to now switch to another BSc. .. you sef reason am.. how e go sound for ear? how you go take table am for friends/families back at home(in NG)? but the reality is, your life is your life, every other thing/body will follow you as soon as you take any decision. Switching, terminating or pausing programs is kinda new to our culture as it looks like failure but I know of non-Nigerians, Germans that have done each of the three.


If you are making a switch to IT.. you should prioritize applied science schools though..




A lot of eye-opening conversations going on here.

A mentor figure told me to prioritize Universitats over Hochschule (school of applied sciences) as the former is better than the former in certain areas?

What do you think?

Also, what advise would you give to someone who wishes to go for a B.Sc Business and Informations system program with the intention of specializing in Supply Chain Analytics?
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by tony5(m): 9:33pm On Dec 11, 2019
Can Someone Please Tell Me About The Student Jobs And Cost Of Living
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by truthsayer009(m): 11:00pm On Dec 11, 2019
willy2000:


The bolded is not absolutely correct, the minimum wage for getting a blue card is 41k if your job falls within what is termed Mangelberuf
They basically check if what you studied and your job is in this category.
Applying for a niederlassung(permanent residency) requires you to have at least B1, this can be issued after 18months after getting the blue card.

I also heard that specifically for IT It's 53k too. So i think he is correct in that regard.

1 Like

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by truthsayer009(m): 11:08pm On Dec 11, 2019
MarkGud:


Thanks alot and to add what Goztino already observed, you are super smart and your advice; sooo on point.

@the bolded, this is my 3rd month in Germany, studying advanced materials analysis (course is a deviation from what I anticipated and research oriented) in a sch in the east of Germany with no student job prospect whatsoever. So u can imagine the scenario.

As for "shame" ish, me no care as it's my life, my career and I hope I make best decisions for myself now that I am some months old in German. I really don't care even if it's BSc path I re-route to now I have the opportunity and chance. Except there are IT MSc programs that are non consecutive for a Materials and Metallurgical Engineering BSc degree holder like myself then fine. (If you know any as such kindly let me know).

U mentioned considering unis close to or in cities/states with growing ecosystem, can you mention a few of the cities and also likely Informatics prog I should consider.

Hello Bro, I just have one piece of advice to give.

Since you plan on changing your course, If changing to another MSC succeeds, that would be much better instead of re-routing to a BSC path. I am speaking as regards to IT & working in IT since I am also in that field.

One year is enough to pick it up & do considerably well if serious. Be it Networking, Project Management or Software Engineering. Apart from the basics which you need to learn from a classroom setup. IT itself is self learning, emphasis on Self-learning because most of the things you would learn is already online. From websites like Coursera, Udemy, Pluralsight & Udacity.

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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by Braket: 12:03am On Dec 12, 2019
0yewale:

I suggested counting out EE because even though very related, from friends that are studying it here:
1. The program is not under computer science or informatics faculty.
2. The few that I know are more of the hardware part of IT than the software part.
3. Most don't offer more than a module for core IT courses and they might even be the elective module.

If you will agree with me, it is the software part (Software/Information Engineering, Data Science/Analytics/Engineering, Design etc. ) of IT that is HOT all over the world.

If you are wondering about what this means, the three points I mentioned determines the type of faculty members(Professors) the program will have (access to), which determines the type of research(group) they have, which determines the type of companies they are collaborating with and thereby determines what they will teach you as well as how they will teach. Can also determines the type of jobs you will be exposed to and might get during and after your study.
e.g a senior lecturer (not even a Prof.) taking a Big Data course, after a class said he is looking for interns for a project (which his company his working on), many people applied and he took-in not less than 10 and the number reduces along the line and I know not less than 2 that continue to work with him in full time capacity after graduation. So, you also have to play the game of possible availability of opportunity and that was why I also mentioned applied science schools earlier.

For a foreign student, ways to gather work experience while studying that I know about are: Internships, Research Assistants (or Tutoring), Research Placements, Working Student and short-term professional work. Each with different requirements (skill and expertise).

You do not really need to be in the big cities, just that the proximity might helps in nailing down the aforementioned experiences, especially if your German language is not yet smooth. The good thing (from my experience), no employer discriminates against schools so far you have what it takes to do whatever they need you for.

I understand your point, but let me tell you this from experience.
Every semester I do a compulsory course module in core IT (Software engineer). We have cover all the UML diagrams so far and we are in intermediate C and C++ programming and we even integrate this with hardware programming i.e microcontroller.

Not to talk of the fact that there are specialized compulsory modules in Interactive system design.

So far in EE program, we have been exposed to tools and skills like SOLIDWORKS, Qt, Arduino programming, C, C++, UML diagrams, MATLAB....

In short, electronic engineering in Germany is basically engineering and IT and yes it might not be as specific as studying data analytics and the likes as these are mostly offered as masters courses. Even information engineering is just like EE

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Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by 0yewale(m): 3:45am On Dec 12, 2019
MarkGud:


Thanks alot Chief, and for the time you used in clarifying things. For the bolded, how do I confirm current stance.

If you dont mind, I wish to PM you.

I don't have access to any web link right now but you can contact your school foreign office for updated info on the current stance (most likely still the same).
You are free to PM me (if very personal) ... sharing here is quite better, information gets updated quite often in Germany.

1 Like

Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by 0yewale(m): 3:48am On Dec 12, 2019
odimbannamdi:


A lot of eye-opening conversations going on here.

A mentor figure told me to prioritize Universitats over Hochschule (school of applied sciences) as the former is better than the former in certain areas?

What do you think?

Also, what advise would you give to someone who wishes to go for a B.Sc Business and Informations system program with the intention of specializing in Supply Chain Analytics?

Universitats focus more on preparing you for research world while Hochschule prepares you more for the industry. If you can't picture yourself doing PhD or going into R & D after your MSc (immediately), I personally don't see how Universitats is better. You will still do all in both type of school though, just that emphasis differs.

I really don't know jack about Supply Chain or its Analytics but if the program is similar to Business Informatics BSc people do in my alma mata,
which is in the Faculty of Informatics, which is more like a Computer Science + Business. Where you pick job after graduation or during internship
might be where the specialization comes in ... I guess same way Software Engineers generally can choose FinTech, HealthTech, Automobile Tech, InsurTech etc. base on interest.
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by 0yewale(m): 3:50am On Dec 12, 2019
tony5:
Can Someone Please Tell Me About The Student Jobs And Cost Of Living
This generally depends on your city/state of residence, skills, language proficiency and your expertise.
There are menial jobs almost everywhere if you can speak good German (B1 upward)
There are professional related jobs too, but your location might determine the type, level of skills and experience you will need.

On the cost of living, not minding wherever your location is, you sha should not be spending all of your monthly block fund ration.
Re: Nigerian Students In Germany..how Do You Survive?? by badmus306(m): 5:15am On Dec 12, 2019
Braket:

I understand your point, but let me tell you this from experience.
Every semester I do a compulsory course module in core IT (Software engineer). We have cover all the UML diagrams so far and we are in intermediate C and C++ programming and we even integrate this with hardware programming i.e microcontroller.

Not to talk of the fact that there are specialized compulsory modules in Interactive system design.

So far in EE program, we have been exposed to tools and skills like SOLIDWORKS, Qt, Arduino programming, C, C++, UML diagrams, MATLAB....

In short, electronic engineering in Germany is basically engineering and IT and yes it might not be as specific as studying data analytics and the likes as these are mostly offered as masters courses. Even information engineering is just like EE
You are tight tho, currently studying EE in DE also.
From what I have gathered so far, EE is a combination of Engineering and IT, some of the company you find their advert online will specifically state "Electronics Engineering, IT or any related field.
My opinion

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