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Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) - Literature (2) - Nairaland

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Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year One (By Kayode Odusanya) / All In One Night (A Romance Novelette By Kayode Odusanya) / Life Of A Shy Guy (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Dammykrone(m): 12:35am On Jun 06
No Update Yet. Maka Why Na
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Taniaa(f): 3:22am On Jun 06
kayo80:
The Diary of a Shy College Kid: Year Two

By

Kayode Odusanya


Chapter 1: Year 2 Begins

My second year at university of Lagos was the most interesting times I had on campus. Year two was nothing like year one. The holiday between was long, and people had enough time to upgrade. Girls that used to dress modestly changed their whole wardrobe; from clothes that covered their whole body, to body revealing dresses. At least seventy percent of us now had mobile phones, and a lot of guys had gotten cars; some pimped up their dad’s old cars, and other bought cars of their own. My friend, Sope had gotten a blue old school Nissan. It wasn’t so fancy, but we fixed a solid sound system in the car.

As usual, Sope and I got a room together; it was at a hall called Jaja, not too far from the female hall, Moremi. Not that that meant anything anyway, as I had already made up my mind to focus on only one thing this session- my books. I had to replace the constant urge I had for the companionship of a woman, so I found the bottle. We had a routine; go to class in the morning, come back to the hall to eat and shower, then go to class to read for a few hours, before heading out to the bar in Sope’s blue car. Beer was cheap…one hundred Naira for Larger beer, and one hundred and seventy Naira for my brand, big Guinness Stout. It was a constant cycle we kept going the whole session. I always had something to look out for at the end of the day, so it kept me focused. And it worked. I had my very best result in those two semesters of my second year in Unilag.

My department was fuller, as a lot of Diploma students had joined us- at least fifteen of them. Also, a few people transferred from Engineering faculty. It just so happened that one of the girls that joined us from Diploma was the light skinned girl I had seen at Debbie’s room the first time I went to see her. The girl had a yummy yellow complexion, dreamy eyes, and had the right curves in all the right places. I hadn’t recognized her at first on the first day of first semester year two when she walked up to ask about the time table. But when I saw her talking to Debbie later on, it clicked. She had a very warm demeanor, and it had an effect on me. I would have asked her out if I didn’t have bad grades and had vowed to stay away from females for as long as I could. She had a circle of friends; they were five in total- Sope and I used to call them Labella Mafia because of how close-knit they were. I bounded with one of them over our mutual love for music, and as an extension, became friends with a few of the other members of the labella mafia.

The guys from Diploma were fly; they dressed fly, and had cool cars. Most of them kept to themselves and never really mingled; they loosened up after a while. The guys that transferred from Engineering were cool, layback guys that had seen years of Unilag’s fast life. They had transferred to my department because of bad grades. Most would have probably been in their fifth year, but had to begin at year two with us. I ended up making friends with a lot of them after finding out one of them was a friend of my elder brother. I would eventually be in a clique with the engineering boys and some other of my course mates. The clique was called D12- dirty dozen. We were twelve guys that had become blind to the flashy lifestyle on campus. We would hangout after classes to talk about movies, music, and the world in general.

The combination of the various individual characters and cliques in my department made year two one of the most memorable years for me in the University of Lagos.
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Taniaa(f): 3:22am On Jun 06
kayo80:
The Diary of a Shy College Kid: Year Two

By

Kayode Odusanya


Chapter 1: Year 2 Begins

My second year at university of Lagos was the most interesting times I had on campus. Year two was nothing like year one. The holiday between was long, and people had enough time to upgrade. Girls that used to dress modestly changed their whole wardrobe; from clothes that covered their whole body, to body revealing dresses. At least seventy percent of us now had mobile phones, and a lot of guys had gotten cars; some pimped up their dad’s old cars, and other bought cars of their own. My friend, Sope had gotten a blue old school Nissan. It wasn’t so fancy, but we fixed a solid sound system in the car.

As usual, Sope and I got a room together; it was at a hall called Jaja, not too far from the female hall, Moremi. Not that that meant anything anyway, as I had already made up my mind to focus on only one thing this session- my books. I had to replace the constant urge I had for the companionship of a woman, so I found the bottle. We had a routine; go to class in the morning, come back to the hall to eat and shower, then go to class to read for a few hours, before heading out to the bar in Sope’s blue car. Beer was cheap…one hundred Naira for Larger beer, and one hundred and seventy Naira for my brand, big Guinness Stout. It was a constant cycle we kept going the whole session. I always had something to look out for at the end of the day, so it kept me focused. And it worked. I had my very best result in those two semesters of my second year in Unilag.

My department was fuller, as a lot of Diploma students had joined us- at least fifteen of them. Also, a few people transferred from Engineering faculty. It just so happened that one of the girls that joined us from Diploma was the light skinned girl I had seen at Debbie’s room the first time I went to see her. The girl had a yummy yellow complexion, dreamy eyes, and had the right curves in all the right places. I hadn’t recognized her at first on the first day of first semester year two when she walked up to ask about the time table. But when I saw her talking to Debbie later on, it clicked. She had a very warm demeanor, and it had an effect on me. I would have asked her out if I didn’t have bad grades and had vowed to stay away from females for as long as I could. She had a circle of friends; they were five in total- Sope and I used to call them Labella Mafia because of how close-knit they were. I bounded with one of them over our mutual love for music, and as an extension, became friends with a few of the other members of the labella mafia.

The guys from Diploma were fly; they dressed fly, and had cool cars. Most of them kept to themselves and never really mingled; they loosened up after a while. The guys that transferred from Engineering were cool, layback guys that had seen years of Unilag’s fast life. They had transferred to my department because of bad grades. Most would have probably been in their fifth year, but had to begin at year two with us. I ended up making friends with a lot of them after finding out one of them was a friend of my elder brother. I would eventually be in a clique with the engineering boys and some other of my course mates. The clique was called D12- dirty dozen. We were twelve guys that had become blind to the flashy lifestyle on campus. We would hangout after classes to talk about movies, music, and the world in general.

The combination of the various individual characters and cliques in my department made year two one of the most memorable years for me in the University of Lagos.
Update
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Dammykrone(m): 8:12am On Jun 06
Taniaa:
Update
Pls Stop Quoting D Whole Episode

1 Like

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by kayo80(m): 3:52pm On Jun 06
My people, I have been traveling a lot this week...I can't seem to get time to sit and write/edit. I will be back on Sunday for sure.

4 Likes

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Electricboy(m): 2:35pm On Jun 09
op, please can you post 3 or 4 episodes today ?

1 Like

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by kayo80(m): 9:53pm On Jun 09
Chapter 6: The First Trip To Ghana (Part 1)

I travelled to Ghana twice during my school year. The first time was shortly after second semester year two kicked off. Lectures weren’t that serious, and a final year student in my department packaged this trip to Ghana by road. I have always loved traveling, especially road trips, and the price for the trip wasn’t that expensive, so I got my dad to pay for it.

Even though I had vowed at the beginning of the school year to distant myself from girls, I had ended up making a lot of female friends over time. There was Bolanle, a dark complexioned, short and plump girl I had become friends with because of our similar taste in music. It’s hard to find girls that love rap music, and I naturally gravitated towards her after I heard her playing some hardcore rap music from her disc man. She was a member of the Labella Mafia- the diploma girls that joined us in year two. They were five in number. Apart from Bolanle, and the light skin beauty that used to be Debby’s roommate, I rarely spoke to the other members of the mafia. In fact, there was one I just didn’t particularly like, and I am sure she also didn’t like me. Her name was Sally, and she was like the ringleader of the clique. Sally was slightly taller than your average girl, pretty, and was sort after by most guys in the department. But I never was charmed by Sally’s beauty.

There was one instance that made me even like her less. One Monday morning, while waiting on a queue for a cab to my department from school gate, I saw Bolanle drive by. She stopped to pick me the moment she saw me, and as I was about to move towards the car, I saw Sally turn to face her, and say something. They started arguing and I took a few steps back to join the queue. It was obvious from Sally’s body language that she didn’t want me in the car. And then Bolanle put the car in reverse, back up towards where I was, and called out my name.

The back of the car was filled with the other Labella Mafia members, so I had to sit in front with Sally. That was one of the most awkward rides I had ever been in. I could feel the negative energy from Sally. It was obvious she hated the fact that I had to sit next to her. I was so nervous in the car and my voice shook while I spoke to Bolanle. I had conquered a lot of my shyness, but it sometimes kicked in when I was in a place I wasn’t welcomed. I remember not even waiting to walk with them to class when we got to the faculty car park. I just said thanks to Bolanle and bounced.
When people started paying for the trip, and I heard that it was only Bolanle and another girl named Ayoni that paid from the Labella Mafia, I was happy. I didn’t want to have to be around bad energy during the trip.

There was another girl I was glad was going to be on the trip too. Her name was Tutu; she was a Jambite. She was dark skinned, petite, and busty. I had been drawn to Tutu the first time I saw her wandering around the department, looking lost, with her hair scattered, and the white t shirt she had on clinging tightly to her body. I was like a hawk in the sky that had just seen a chick wandering a lone. But before I could summon up the courage to walk up to her, another hawk was by her side.

I kept seeing her around, and watching her from a distance, but never stepped up to talk to her. Then one day, during first semester year two exams, my pencil broke, and I was asking one of my course mates for a pencil sharpener when the lecturer whose course we were writing walked in. He had thought I was trying to cheat, and asked me to leave the class.

I was right behind him, and kept begging as he walked down the stairs of the art block, explaining to him what had happened, but he paid me no mind.

With the diploma students and people from Engineering faculty joining us in year two, our normal class couldn’t contain us any longer for examinations, so in addition to our class, we used a lecture hall on the ground floor of the art building. That was where the lecturer was headed. When he got to the entrance of the hall, he finally turned around to hear me out, and felt pity for me. He asked me to wait outside as he went into the hall.

I peeped into the hall and saw he was trying to create space for me at the back, and I realized I still had a broken pencil. I started asking everyone around for a pencil sharpener. No one had one. And then I found myself face to face with Tutu. All this while I had been trying to summon confidence to talk to her, now I was forced to talk to her. She said she didn’t have a pencil sharpener when I asked, but she searched her bag and brought a razor blade. As I took the thing from her, I heard the lecturer’s footsteps approaching the entrance of the hall. With shaky hands, I tried to sharpen my pencil quickly, but I was messing it all up. Tutu grabbed the pencil and razor from me, and sharpened the pencil within seconds. By the time the lecturer stepped out and asked me to go in, she had already handed back the pencil to me. I thanked her with a smile before walking into the hall.

After the examination, I walked out of the hall happy, heading towards the stairs when I heard a female voice say, “How was it?” I turned around and saw her leaning on the wall, outside the scanty corridors of the lecture hall. It was obvious she had waited for me. I walked over to thank her properly, introduced myself, and asked for her name, even though I already knew it. We talked for a while before exchanging numbers and going our separate ways. I started talking to her frequently on the phone and in person, and we became real good friends.

When the day for Ghana trip finally arrived, I was so happy to see her on the bus. She was in the front of the luxury bus with some of her classmates. I greeted her and headed towards the back, where my friend, Babatope had kept a seat for me. Bolanle and her friend, Ayoni occupied the seats in front of us; I smiled at them as I put my bag on the luggage rack above. Babatope and I greeted with two hand slaps, and he shouted out my name in greeting as he usually did when he was excited. When the bus took off moments later, I sat back in my seat, closed my eyes and visualized partying on a beach in Accra.

4 Likes

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by kayo80(m): 9:54pm On Jun 09
Electricboy:
op, please can you post 3 or 4 episodes today ?

Sorry, not possible. I am very busy these days.
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Electricboy(m): 11:25pm On Jun 09
kayo80 , 1 update per week ? please make time out of your spare time to cover up for the lost time....plsss
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by olab059(m): 11:39pm On Jun 09
Electricboy:
kayo80 , 1 update per week ? please make time out of your spare time to cover up for the lost time....plsss

Bro, relax and let him go at his pace. If you like what he writes, let him go at the pace he is comfortable with, before he will start rushing, and quality drops...you can't rush great creative work. I am sure there are many other great stories on here, you can read them in the mean time.
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Electricboy(m): 11:58pm On Jun 09
olab059:


Bro, relax and let him go at his pace. If you like what he writes, let him go at the pace he is comfortable with, before he will start rushing, and quality drops...you can't rush great creative work. I am sure there are many other great stories on here, you can read them in the mean time.

alright ,thanks
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by superjaks(m): 12:35am On Jun 10
This trip go mad gan

1 Like

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by prosper21(m): 10:19am On Jun 10
op, you're doing just fine. More strength

1 Like

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by kayo80(m): 11:57pm On Jun 12
Chapter 7: The First Trip To Ghana (Part 2)

The results for first semester exams had been released a week before the Ghana trip, and I was in a real relaxed mood as I had good grades. Three A’s and two B’s in my five major departmental courses, and B’s in the three carry over GST courses from year one. It was a major improvement from my year one result, so I was in the mood to have some fun.

The bus was noisy throughout the ride through Lagos traffic, but when we got the Badagry express, and the bus was speeding through the free road, people started falling asleep one by one. The Badagry express road stretched on and on like it had no end. Babatope had fallen asleep a while back. My disc man batteries were down, and I was bored, looking outside at the rows of palm trees by the sides of the road. Just then, Ayoni’s head popped up from where she sat in front of me. She smiled and said she thought I had slept. We chit chatted for a few seconds, and then she sat back down.

Ayoni was the closest to Bolanle in the Labella Mafia clique, and they went everywhere together. Even though I talked to her every now and then, I couldn’t quite tell the kind of person she really was. She could be a tomboy today, and tomorrow be a slay queen. One moment she is talkative, the next moment she is quiet. I remember one time she walked up to me out of the blue and said, “You have a fine nose.” She walked away immediately afterwards, leaving me puzzled.

I was daydreaming, looking out the bus when Ayoni’s head popped up again and she asked if I wanted to switch places with her. I said, okay, and got off my seat. She walked over to get in my seat, next to Babatope, while I took her seat by the window, next to Bolanle. The excitement on Bolanle’s face was obvious when I joined her, and we started off talking about music. As much as we enjoyed each other’s company, our relationship never went beyond a platonic one.

When we got to Lagos-Benin Republic border, we were all asked to come down from the bus, and our bus was searched by customs. People took the time to ease themselves, walk around, and talk to friends. I looked around for Tutu, and we spoke for a few minutes before she said she had to go and be with her friends. She had been doing that a lot lately, and I was starting to think I was being too clingy, or maybe she didn’t fancy my company as much as I thought.

People were already getting back into the bus, and I went back to my seat as I thought of what I was actually doing with Tutu. She had already let me know she had a serious relationship, and we couldn’t be anything other than friends. I had been friendzoned and had been comfortable with that, but as I sat and thought about it, I wondered why I was still hanging on. There and then, I decided to try and get close to someone else on the trip.

……….

We got to Aflao border, the border between Benin Republic and Ghana at night, and couldn’t cross over, so we had to spend the night at the border. The guy that put the road trip together made arrangements for us to sleep in three empty rooms at the border. He disappeared for a while, and came back with like three mattresses on his head. He went back with a few people to get more mattresses and they were placed in the rooms for us to sleep.

Everyone was hungry. The last meal we had had was in the afternoon when we had stopped somewhere around Badagry to eat. Someone spoke out about being hungry, and everyone echoed it. Someone pointed at a man selling bread a few meters from where we were, and my course mates headed over there. At this point, I had already decided that if I was going to have fun on this trip, I had to avoid Tutu, so I stayed back by the bus. It was really cold, and I did the collar button of the blue and white checked long sleeve shirt I had on. I pulled out my Nokia phone, and started playing snake on it.

People started returning after a while, munching on long hard looking loaves of bread. I remember the type of bread as a kid; it used to be called Togo bread. It looked really inviting, but I didn’t want to leave where I was. Just then, I heard a sweet sounding female voice say, “Do you want some? I don’t think I can finish it.” I turned to the left and saw it was a girl from Tutu’s class. I hadn’t even known she was on the trip. It was like she had just popped out of nowhere. She had the same statue as Tutu; petite, and busty, but she was light skinned. The way she spoke to me was like she really knew me, but I really couldn’t remember ever talking to her. I said yes, and she cut the bread in half. We sat on a bench by the bus and started talking about how sweet the bread was, even though it was very hard. From there, we went on to talk about the long trip to Ghana, and then the conversation just flowed. By the time we went to sleep that night, we had become real good friends.

As soon as the border was opened the next morning, we continued our trip. We were already in Ghana, but it took us another 3-4 hours to get to the capital, Accra. As we drove through the streets of Ghana, I was marvelled at how neat and organized the place was. This was an African country like Nigeria, but it was a lot more beautiful than Nigeria, even though they obviously weren’t as rich as we were.

We drove straight to the University of Ghana, Legon, where we would be staying. There was a basketball court in front of the three storey hostel building we were lodging in, and I thought about the contrast between the place and my hostel in Unilag. This place was painted in white, and almost looked like a hotel. The greenery around was well tended to, and there was no thrash lying around the place. We settled in, and when I went to shower, I was hit with another shocker. I could actually eat in the bathroom if I had to; that was how neat the place was. All these got me wondering why Nigeria was so ‘jagajaga’ and this place so organized.

After settling in, we went to eat at a canteen down the road from the hostel. They sold a lot of Ghanaian dishes I knew I would purge for a week if I ever tried eating. I was glad when I saw they also sold fufu. After eating, we headed out to the market. I was surprised to see posters of Nollywood movies all over the place. It was obvious that they were big fans of our movies. That restored my faith in Nigeria a little bit.

My new friend, Dora was with me everywhere. We went to change money somewhere in the market, and the man happened to be a Yoruba man. I was shocked when he said he had never been to Nigeria before. His parents had moved to Ghana in the 70s and never took him with them anytime they had to visit Nigeria. It was just so weird that he could speak Yoruba, but had never been to Nigeria before. He kept asking me how Nigeria was, excited as I told him about a few places. Little did he know he was better off in Ghana.

We went to a few spots after leaving the market, like the Kwame Nkrumah Mausoleum, and those that came with cameras took pictures. How technology has changed. Now everyone can take pictures on their camera phones.

Our last spot was at one of Ghana’s beautiful beaches. We stayed there till it got dark, listening to music, drinking, and chit chatting. Dora and I were at a table far from the rest, talking, while Tutu stole glances at us a few feet away. She was obviously jealous, but I just wanted to have fun. At some point, Dora and I started dancing. She had heard a song she liked and pulled me up to dance. Tutu passed by our side, and I greeted her casually. She walked around aimlessly for a while, and went back to her seat. I guess there really is some truth to the theory that girls mostly want guys that are taken. Like Janet Jackson said on that old song, Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t you’ve got till it’s gone.

I don’t know if Dora was on a mission to piss Tutu off, but she started dancing really seductive with me. She backed her behind into me, and I had to hold on to her waste as we danced. She smelt so good, and her body was so soft. It felt so good holding on to her.

By the end of the night, people concluded that we were a couple. But, when we got back on campus after the trip, the friendship that had developed between Dora and I died as fast as it had come to life. Tutu on the other hand started valuing me more; calling me and coming over to my hostel room every now and then.

4 Likes

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by superjaks(m): 3:35pm On Jun 13
That's why I don't dull around friends like Dora, cause they could just switch off anytime

1 Like

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by aprilwise(m): 5:23pm On Jun 13
Thanks for the update

1 Like

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by FantasticJ: 6:36pm On Jun 13
Well done Op

1 Like

Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by kayo80(m): 8:16pm On Jun 13
superjaks:
That's why I don't dull around friends like Dora, cause they could just switch off anytime

Exactly! wink
Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Electricboy(m): 7:13am On Jun 14
grin grin wink

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Re: Diary Of A Shy College Kid: Year Two (by Kayode Odusanya) by Ann2012(f): 7:47am On Jun 14
Thanks for the update

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