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The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) - Literature (3) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Entertainment / Literature / The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) (11268 Views)

Jungle Justice!!! (Sequel To Hair On Fire) / Larry Sun,pls Post The Link To The Paradox Of Abel Here. / Sequel To "without A Silver Spoon" By Eddie Iroh (1) (2) (3) (4)

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Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 12:33am On Jan 06, 2013
Damex333: yepa,dt 1 no gud o,oya abrakadabra ur eleventh finger don gun back,other no gree gun o.
I'VE GOT ONLY TEN FINGERS!!!
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 12:36am On Jan 06, 2013
Now Red, I'm over to your 'Nerd. I need some laughs before I hit the pillows.
grin
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Damex333(m): 12:49am On Jan 06, 2013
Larry-Sun:

I'VE GOT ONLY TEN FINGERS!!!
u av 1 more finger than enlarge wen need be,and come back 2 normal size wen necessary,now u should understand ur eleventh finger is somewhere below ur COG
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Iaz93: 5:17am On Jan 06, 2013
At last! Larry don't leave us again oh! Nice...
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Damex333(m): 7:23am On Jan 06, 2013
Larry-Sun:
Now Red, I'm over to your 'Nerd. I need some laughs before I hit the pillows.
grin
dnt mind that redmosquito,his thread is full wit tonto dikes song wit loudspeakers

1 Like

Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Beretta92(m): 8:17am On Jan 06, 2013
This is gonna be interesting.i love d way u introduce d characters 2 us b4 d many twists begin 2 unfold.larry,dont be gone for long.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by emma_best2000(m): 5:23am On Jan 08, 2013
intresting intresting intresting
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Beretta92(m): 11:01am On Jan 08, 2013
Larry,you're on front page now.oya come and continue.this is your opportunity to get more followers.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 11:05am On Jan 08, 2013
Beretta92: Larry,you're on front page now.oya come and continue.this is your opportunity to get more followers.

Wow!
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Nobody: 11:13am On Jan 08, 2013
if only these great writers can be encouraged and sponsored, they will do wonders and achieve greatness

Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by pillzthadrugz(m): 12:29pm On Jan 08, 2013
so you guys mean i've been wasting my time all along? mtzewwww.....poor storyline.........tell about cain pls
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 12:55pm On Jan 08, 2013
Ruth wasn't beautiful, wasn't that pretty either, but few humans of the opposite sex realised it when caught by her charm and shapely figure. On her face were too sharply blended the delicate features of the river goddess and the large eyes of an owl; large, bright and appealing. It was an arresting face perfect for the simple but lovely shape of what stood on her shoulders. If she had been any prettier, it would have been all wrong; except if her small nose was carved a little bit more pointed like that of an American; and her full lips were reduced to thin slits like an Asian. Because her eyes protruded particularly prominently from their sockets, the Creator had kindly blessed her with bristly black lashes and her eyebrows were carved proudly. Unlike most ladies, Ruth had never shaved off her eyebrows; she cherished them. The only thing she did was carefully trim them out, and making out of them very lovely brows that were left slightly tilted at the end, and cuttting a startling oblique line in her spotless skin; a skin so desired by other women and also generously soft to the touch.

She was a tall lady, her legs were narrow and straight and her walks were with a certain uncommon swagger full of grace. She wore perfectly neat and trimmed hair-cut. Her bosoms were full and pointed. Her belly was flat. Her hips were carved proportionally to her waist and straight legs. Her gliding manner of movement was the precise counting steps of a model. She was wearing a close-fitting sequined dress, deeply cut at the bosom so that a portion of each bosom overflowed and was visible. The dress gently but pruriently affirmed the lines of her gracefully volumptious body.

Ruth Brown was thirty-seven years old.

She glided past a group of young boys who were trying to let out their firecrackers in style. Ruth knew exactly what the boys were planning to do and she did not approve of that. But she knew that she could not stop this cluster of young insects from carrying out their mission; few children of these days fear and respect their elders. The boys were gathering bottles and cans. The firecrackers were sometimes covered with tin cans and when they explode, the cans would fly towards the sky, bent and disfigured. The boys usually run like hell everytime they light the fuses and drop them into bottles, because, most times, the bottle would shattered into shards, and no boy would want to hang close-by when the explosion was set-off. But sometimes, the bottles would not break, not even crack; thereby eliciting disappointment on the faces of the excited boys. Not very far away from the boys, an L-driver was struggling to turn her car, and was painfully succeeding. The instructor must be quite a patient man. An old Honda Accord was parked beside the road, facing south, and a man was leaning under the raised bonnet, repairing something.

Three days before, a teenager had been rushed to the hospital because he was silly and misguided enough to stay too close to a bottle when his peers were running. When the exposion went off, shards had found ways into his sockets, and many more on his skins. The lad was surely spending his own Christmas in a room of fluorescent ceiling panels, white walls, and a white ceramic tile floor which implied impeccable antibacterial procedures. Facing the possibility of spending the rest of his life absent his eyes.

Ruth Brown was married three times. Her first husband, Tunde Smart, had married her only for the fact that she was pregnant for him when she was only seventeen years old. There was no love shared between either of them. Tunde had already known that Ruth wasn't the girl meant for him. She possessed the heart of stone. She had little or no conscience, and she could watch a man bleed to death without blinking an eye. Loving her was as sordid and as horrifying as loving a dead body. They lived together for over two years before they both finally decided that it was better for either of them, and their daughter, if they parted ways. All through the twenty-five months they lived together, each was never faithful to the other. They individually possessed the liberty of going to bed with whomever appealed to them. Both husband and wife shared their matrimonial pillows with total strangers until their daughter began to grow up and speak words. Not until their daughter chose the F-word as her first speech did they realise that things would really get out of hand if they continued their immoral acts in the presence of their baby. Without any fight or quarrel, the couple agreed to live apart. And the father kept the baby because she never trusted Ruth with the capability of raising the child into a responsible woman. And Ruth did not demur. In fact, she never went back to visit her daughter.

After breaking up with Tunde, she got married to another one of her clients who, more or less, forced himself on her. The marriage had spanned only three months. Her new husband had found her humping another man in such vigorous ways she had never done to him. Filled with so much disappointment and rage and jealousy, he had not attacked the man who whose thing was still embedded inside his wife, neither did he touch the wife whose eyes were shut in ecstacy. He had only suffered a bout of cardiac arrests and slumped down dead at the foot of the creaking bed. Who could really tell how Adam had felt when she had deceived him with the forbidden fruit? Unfortunately for the deceased husband, his wife made sure she climaxed on her lover before she decided to call the paramedics. The man's death had made as much impression on her as a rubber hammer makes on a rock.

Her third husband was the man with whom she was really, seriously in love; her finally found Prince Charming. She'd stick her hand in the fire if he asked her. Tony Brown, who was the love of her life, the linchpin of her heart, the lintel of her body, the keystone of her soul, never loved her a bit. A man whose profitable sidelines had been financed by the proceeds of his less legitimate activities that included drug-peddling, blackmail, organised vice and extortion. Another of Tony's less-profitable sidelines was the distribution and marketing of stolen goods like jewellery and mobile phones. But four years elapsed before she found out about the jobs of her husband, and Ruth had not loved him any less. In fact, she was even proud of him at learning about these vices. She thought for a brief moment how absurd, even silly, it was to love a man whose one talent was crime. Originally, Eve gave Adam an apple. Nowadays, Adams gave Eves some. What took her those four years to find out also included the fact that Tony, her Tony, belonged to someone else. She had given up everything for this Prince; she had been faithful for once, no other man had climbed her hill all through the times she spent with Tony. Her love for Tony had rebuilt her morally. The moral edifice had came crumbling down suddenly when she read in City People Magazine about the tenth wedding anniversary of Tony and the daughter of a state governor in the South-South. Not believing her eyes, she read and reread the article under the pictures printed in the magazine; her lips moving, her shaky hands following each line with the tip of her index. She got stuck on the names. She was devastated; she took the news as though it were her own obituary. It was as if she had been hit a furious blow in the stomach. Acid formed in her throat, her breath stopped; she felt the blood rush to her head, she felt, for an instant, somewhat sick, and her eyes pained her as she looked down at the mag she was having spread on her thighs. Ruth had never believed that she would ever be played for a sucker by any man. She was humiliated, sad and, most of all, ashamed of herself that she contemplated the possibility of committing suicide. She has cried and dried her eyes, and cried again. It was her father's Christmas invitation that had prevented her from initiating the decision to slit her own wrists, hang herself, swallow cyanide or take a long walk off a short pier. She had later vowed never to get married. She was still thinking of Tony; his handsome face and his black wavy hair and his beautiful strong body when her mother had called and informed her about her father's Christmas summons. Ruth fully felt one of those cathartical moments when God hands us the emotional scissors and invites us to start cutting, irrevocably. She found herself caught in a whirling vortex of sorry emotions. If Ruth hadn't thought that this would take her mind temporarily off Jamal, she wouldn't have honoured the summons, because he had no fondness whatsoever for the rich old man. The man had simply never appealed to her, and no matter how much she showered her with gift as she grew older, Ruth had never liked him.

She had come home from her first day in the secondary school one afternoon, hungry and tired, when she heard the voice of Ramat, their housemaid. Ramat was groaning painfully. When she followed the sound to the kitchen she beheld the sight of her father on top of Ramat. The housemaid was crying softly amid groans and moans as Jamal screwed her viciously. The next day, Ramat had packed her bags and quitted her job. Ruth's mother could not find the reasoning behind the maid's sudden decision. And her father had feigned ignorance, he wasn't aware that Ruth saw him the day before. To keep a happy home and her mother from being heartbroken, Ruth kept the discovery to herself. But she reserved a resentment worse than that between a feline and a canine. Ruth cherished her mother above every other member of the family. What a remarkable woman Mrs. Malik was, thought Ruth. She was everything to her now. Her mother understood her in a thousand ways more than her father ever would.

As she thought about the brutality of her father towards the housemaid which had occurred many years ago, Ruth suddenly felt like she was going crazy about living the life of a nun. It was weeks since she had last romped any man. In quite all this time she hadn't taken anything to bed except a Romance-Machine, and she was growing tired of that. She missed having someone hairy in bed with her. She missed the masculine smells; stinging sensual beards, warm breaths, sweaty skins, and most of all, she missed the bangs. Before her disappointment that resulted from Tony's action, Ruth had thought that she could never do without having a bang; she had believed that if she went two days without even giving a head, she would sneeze continuously and dust would come out of her ears. If absence makes the heart grow fonder, romp-deprivation surely makes Ruth's puss seep ointment. When radical feminists, like the dwellers of the convents, argued that the manhood was the enemy, Ruth had always replied, "Speak for yourself, sister." Ruth was simply an unrestrained nymphomaniac in bed. She could make the average man plead for mercy, if he didn't pass out.

Because the Governor had woken up one morning and placed a ban on the operation of commercial motorcyclists, Ruth was forced to hail a taxi and directed her way towards a secluded part of Victoria Island, where she already was. She was going towards the home where she grew up with her parents and siblings. Towards her family.

Towards Jamal.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Uniquexty(f): 1:40pm On Jan 08, 2013
Subscribing
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by nokingasgod: 5:06pm On Jan 08, 2013
THis is creative but for the inaccuracies in historical facts, it could have been another Chinua Achebe in the making. Behind the Cloud and Village Headmaster are not movies but soaps. The movie Aiye by Hubert Ogunde was released later than 1975. In 1975, there was no Majek Fashek on the music scene and lastly, in 1975, seven universities were not founded as there were already in existence, seven universities.

As a rule, references to historical occurences/developments in literary works, fiction or not must be factual.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Redmosquito(m): 5:22pm On Jan 08, 2013
pillzthadrugz: so you guys mean i've been wasting my time all along? mtzewwww.....poor storyline.........tell about cain pls
**Calls out to Chukwudi**
Me: Chukwudi! Amadioha talisman! When you use am last?
Chukwudi: Haa! Oga! Na him I use kill papa Ejiofor last week na!
Me: Ehen! Oya! Borrow me!
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by kepsi123(m): 5:51pm On Jan 08, 2013
My friend. only one word for u. Sensational.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Beretta92(m): 6:53pm On Jan 08, 2013
Kai! Walahi! I like am por ruth!
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 9:10pm On Jan 08, 2013
nokingasgod: THis is creative but for the inaccuracies in historical facts, it could have been another Chinua Achebe in the making. Behind the Cloud and Village Headmaster are not movies but soaps. The movie Aiye by Hubert Ogunde was released later than 1975. In 1975, there was no Majek Fashek on the music scene and lastly, in 1975, seven universities were not founded as there were already in existence, seven universities.

As a rule, references to historical occurences/developments in literary works, fiction or not must be factual.
Thanks a lot, NoKingAsGod, I shall revisit those historical facts when I'm doing a personal pogrom on the work. You may click on the prequel of this story, which I have under my signature (The Brand Of Cain), I'm sure you'll like it a lot. Thanks again.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by eghuan1(m): 10:21pm On Jan 08, 2013
@larry. Brilliant story, intelligent write-up. I just wanted to draw ur mind to the fact that AIDS has not been discovered in 1975. It was found out around 1984.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Afamdman(m): 1:28pm On Jan 09, 2013
Larry, larry, larry here you go again. So far so good. Liked the way you told the bank robbery story actually felt the suspense and speed of the action. Well let's enjoy the rest of the story, keep it up bro. No mistakes like the last time ohhhh. Jamal came to the house 28years ago and ruth is 35years old. Well let me wait to see the links.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 3:25pm On Jan 10, 2013
Thank all, for the corrections. You're helping me a lot.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Phatkemi: 7:31am On Jan 15, 2013
Mr Larry howfar nah? U no wan update again?
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Splendblex(f): 8:15pm On Jan 15, 2013
Weldone! Larry, this is interestin...
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by HumbledbYGrace: 9:26pm On Jan 15, 2013
Splendblex: Weldone! Larry, this is interestin...
Can u seduce Larry undecided
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 9:36pm On Jan 15, 2013
HumbledbYGrace: Can u seduce Larry undecided
HBG!
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by HumbledbYGrace: 9:52pm On Jan 15, 2013
Larry-Sun:

HBG!
Larry!!!

Come on now and I hope da deal is still on
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 10:04pm On Jan 15, 2013
HumbledbYGrace: Larry!!!

Come on now and I hope da deal is still on
I'll try my best.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by DonGoK: 10:16pm On Jan 15, 2013
Larry i command U̶̲̥̅̊ to update now or else....i unfollow
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Larry-Sun(m): 11:04pm On Jan 15, 2013
David Malik always found his own name quite unusual; considering the fact that both were derived from two different religious books. When he'd asked his father about it, as he was growing up, Jamal had simply told him that it was because he was a special child. But as he grew older, he knew that the answer wasn't true; there was nothing really special about him. Except for the fact that when he was born, he'd suffered a medical ailment where where his index and middle finger had been joined right from the knuckles. When his parents began to panic, most especially his father, the doctor had assured them that the defect was what could easily be surgically corrected. And within two hours thereafter, David could wave goodbyes without his hand looking odd.

David was his father's favourite, whom he resembled immensely. Add a moustache and a beard to his physique and you'd be stumped at telling them apart, except for the difference in skin texture. His father's hide was shrunken and dried while David, thirty years old, possessed the smooth skin of a lad. His face was artfully chiselled out; his nose straight, his eyes as wild as a wolf's, his mouth a proud bearer of lips meant for Miss Nigeria; maybe the angels who moulded him and that who did Agbani switched places. But contrary to the biblical king he was named after, David was a lousy dancer. A lousy singer too. When he hummed, cups placed on tables vibrated. When he sang Jailer, Asa would want to lock him up and throw the keys to his jail into an ocean. He rarely laughed. The kind of mouth he was blessed with, he only used for vile dispositions. He was a stranger to most people because he never made any friend; his wife and child were likened though, but he never cared to be liked by anyone other than his father. The kind of respect he placed for Jamal, he had never placed on anyone. Not even for President Goodluck Jonathan. David was more like a wanderer, because he never lived in a place for more than two years.

Few people in his current residential area knew him, though he was not a native of Aba, having only resided there for the last fifteen months; which, in the eyes of the older inhabitants who had spent the whole of their lives in the peaceful town, still constituted him a stranger.

Nobody there knew very much about him, not even his in-laws, because David had gotten married to a girl there in the East. And, nobody cared to know. For the few people who knew little about David Malik also knew about his faulty tongue. Though, some people may even see him of a peaceful disposition generally, but more people knew him to have a vocabulary of aweful and blood-curling curse-words if anyone upset him.
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by HumbledbYGrace: 11:25pm On Jan 15, 2013
See I had to mention u in ma prayers so that u could update? Next time Iam going to fast angry

grin grin grin grin
Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Redmosquito(m): 2:08am On Jan 16, 2013
**walks into thread with walking stick trembling within the grasp on one hand**
Haaa!! I remember when this story began, a hundred years ago. Yes! I was there. And now it continues?

1 Like

Re: The Paradox Of Abel (The Sequel) by Beretta92(m): 7:05am On Jan 16, 2013
Redmosquito: **walks into thread with walking stick trembling within the grasp on one hand**
Haaa!! I remember when this story began, a hundred years ago. Yes! I was there. And now it continues?
meaning u'll be 200 by d next update.

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