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Starting A Security Company In Nigeria - Business - Nairaland

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Professional Security Guards Services Available By UK Security Company @ Nigeria / Angel Investor/partnership Needed To Expanded Our Asset Security Company / Need Help And Advice On Starting Risk Managment/private Security Company Nigeria (1) (2) (3) (4)

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Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by Omoboy(m): 4:37pm On Jul 31, 2006
Hello everybody i am thinking of starting a security company in Nigeria i will like to know what the requirements are to get a licence and how lucrative this business can be.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by Ralex(m): 4:53pm On Jul 31, 2006
Which state are u in ?
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by Omoboy(m): 5:03pm On Jul 31, 2006
I am in Lagos state but i am considering Abuja or Lagos.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by LoverBwoy(m): 3:55am On Aug 01, 2006
license? idont think u need one in nigeria just register your company

what kind of security are u thinking of, personal security or events?

Get some couple of big guys from the east or local gym get them some uniform or suit n (bulletproof)and get them to do some basic martial art training or boxing grin

You're good to go wink
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by asscend: 10:39pm On Aug 01, 2006
The man power is there, so all u need is register ur firm and ensure they don't call u to do some contracted killings on political oponents. Ex military officials will do a great job but definitely not the Nigerian Police, even though many of them will apply. Naija needs such firms for Private estates and coprate firms. I suggest u incoporate the latest CCTV Technology as part of what ur firm deals with. Security business is huge; but it requires planning and good technological gadgets to confuse those foolish naija thief men. Go for it. Start some thing.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by exu(m): 4:22pm On Aug 02, 2006
Get some couple of big guys from the east

Why from the east?

I realise that this was a 'joke' but what's the story behind it?
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by LoverBwoy(m): 5:17pm On Aug 02, 2006
na wa o

sensitivity to the highest order i cant even make a joke on my people?

the story behind it > NOLLYWOOD <
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by Omoboy(m): 7:04pm On Aug 06, 2006
thx guys for all your contribution do not hesitate to give me more tips. God bless you.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by JoExplorer(m): 11:31pm On Apr 23, 2007
Anyhow,

I have connections in the private security World, a company i know a security company interested in expanding their operations into Nigeria, i see that Oil executives need protection ie Oil Platforms/ Pipes, this could be the Next Gold Mine beyond Iraq in the private sector,

Only Want Serious Responses

Current Private Security companies in Nigeria include Triplecanopy, Enriys, Northbridge services group
1. triplecanopy.com
2. northbridgeservices.com
3. erinysinternational.com

Out of the mentioned companies above, i am in talks with one of them on a weekly basis.

Some good bank can be made, Getting Arms, Aircraft, Professional Hired Guns is not a problem.



Article published Apr 21, 2007
Growing Unrest Posing a Threat to Nigerian Oil

PORT HARCOURT, Nigeria — There are few safe places left for oil companies in the Niger Delta, the epicenter of this country’s petroleum industry.
Armed rebel gangs have blown up pipelines, disabled pumping stations, and kidnapped over 150 foreign oil workers in the last year. Companies now confine employees to heavily fortified compounds, allowing them to travel only by armored car or helicopter.
One company has fitted bathrooms with steel bolts to turn them into “panic” rooms, if needed. Another has coated the pylons of a giant oil-production platform 80 miles offshore with waterproof grease to prevent attackers from climbing the rig.
The violence in the Niger Delta is likely to be one of the thorniest political problems for Nigeria’s new president, to be chosen in the election April 21. Oil, after all, is the mainstay of Nigeria’s economy, providing 65 percent of its revenue.
The events in Nigeria, the world’s eighth-largest oil exporter, have rippled across energy markets, contributing to higher prices and tighter supplies.
[On Friday, gunmen attacked a boat carrying oil workers to an offshore rig in the delta, pushing up oil prices by more than $1.50, to $63.38 a barrel.]
The United States imports more than one million barrels of crude oil from Nigeria every day.
Many analysts warn that tensions here could derail plans to boost oil production in this country of 140 million people. Already, a quarter of Nigeria’s oil output has been shut down, costing an estimated $12 billion in lost sales in over the last year. Some foreign operators have abandoned oil fields, or left the country altogether.
“I can’t think of anything worse right now,” said Larry Johnson, a former United States Army officer who was recently hired to toughen security at a site here operated by Eni, an Italian oil producer. “Even Angola during the civil war wasn’t as bad.”
Violence is not new to the Niger Delta, a vast area of 40,000 square miles of swamps and creeks where the Niger River washes out into the Atlantic Ocean. The region, which produces most of the country’s oil, is also one of the nation’s poorest.
In the 1990s, there were occasional kidnappings. But at the time, recalled Chris Haynes, a senior Shell executive, “you could usually get them released for a few bags of rice or a cow.”
Since January 2006, however, violence in the delta has surged. So far in 2007, there have been at least 18 attacks against oil facilities or bases in the delta, according to Bergen Risk Solutions, a consultancy based in Bergen, Norway.
And about 70 foreigners have been abducted in 2007, although most have been released within weeks in exchange for ransoms, typically hundreds of thousands of dollars. Oil companies find themselves in an uneasy position, stuck in a crisis that they, in a sense, helped create. For years, human rights groups accused them of turning a blind eye to the corruption of Nigeria’s successive military regimes while damaging the environment in the delta.
Some companies have acknowledged these past grievances but say they changed after Nigeria returned to civilian rule in 1999.
Still, gas flaring into the atmosphere remains a serious problem despite a government deadline to end the practice by 2008; few expect that deadline will be met. Also, oil spills continue to spoil the delta’s fragile environment. Energy executives blame locals for sabotaging their pipelines either to steal the oil or to gain lucrative cleanup contracts.
By all accounts, petroleum profits have brought huge benefits to this country’s rulers, but few to its people. Oil companies typically keep 7 percent of the profits from oil sales; the government gets 93 percent.
Nigeria ranks as one of the most corrupt countries in the world according to Transparency International, a Berlin-based anti-corruption group; 70 percent of the country’s population lives on $1 a day or less. Life expectancy is 47 years.
Between 1960 and 1999, more than $380 billion was stolen or wasted, according to Nuhu Ribadu, Nigeria’s top anti-corruption official. In that period, the country produced over $400 billion worth of oil.
In an effort to redistribute wealth, the government now gives 13 percent of the proceeds from oil sales to the producing states but there is little accountability of how these funds are spent. Much of it simply disappears, wasted by inefficient or corrupt local officials, according to a recent Human Rights Watch report.
The River States government, for example, had a budget of $1.3 billion in 2006, the report said. It includes transportation fees of $65,000 a day for the governor’s office; $10 million for catering, entertainment, gifts and souvenirs; and $38 million for two helicopters. Health services received $22 million.
“Oil companies are caught in an impossible situation,” said Chris Albin-Lackey, a researcher with Human Rights Watch. “They cannot meet the expectations of the communities in which they operate. At the same time, you have a government unwilling to do anything about the delta.”
Oil companies have all set up programs to build roads, hospitals or schools in their communities. Shell, for example, said it spends over $100 million each year on social and health programs in the Niger Delta. Exxon, which has set aside $21 million for similar projects in 2007, noted it had built 95 percent of the roads in the town of Eket, close to one of its operations.
But in the absence of government services, executives say their programs alone cannot buy them sustained peace.
“The government should really be the one who looks after everybody else,” said Basil Omiyi, Shell’s managing director in Nigeria. “I don’t think the capital program of oil and gas companies can be the government in the Niger Delta.”
John Chaplin, Exxon’s top executive in Nigeria, said “The demands are limitless.”
Critics say governments in Abuja, the country’s modern capital, have neglected the delta region and blame oil companies for being complicit in a system that ignores the communities where the oil is produced.
“The situation here is deplorable,” said John Owubokiri, an advocate for the rights of the delta states in Port Harcourt. “The people are being shortchanged.”
That message is now being delivered in a more forceful way than the largely nonviolent militancy of the past decade. A new group, the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta, has emerged in the past year and claimed responsibility for many of the kidnappings and attacks against oil companies.
MEND wants more money for the delta states and has vowed to bring Nigeria’s oil exports to a stop if its demands are not met.
“We are more than capable of escalating the violence,” the MEND spokesman, Jomo Gbomo, who regularly sends e-mail messages to the media, wrote in response to e-mailed questions. The group, he said, is prepared for “a protracted military confrontation.”
The violence has driven some companies away. Willbros, one of the world’s largest independent contractors, left Nigeria last summer after nearly 45 years, because nine of its employees were held in the swamps for weeks. After their release, Willbros said the dangers in Nigeria “exceed our acceptable risk levels.”
After one of Shell’s big export sites was bombed in February 2006, the company abandoned its operations in the Western part of the delta and shut half its production, or 500,000 barrels a day. In early April, Shell outlined plans to restart production within six months. Meanwhile, the government has been unable to quell the unrest, security consultants said. “Nigeria’s security forces are ill equipped, poorly led, unmotivated, and outgunned,” said Ian Pilcher, the head of Nigerian operations for ArmorGroup, a British security consultant.
But Nigerian officials say they do not want to escalate tensions by sending more troops to the region.
“It’s definitely not a first option,” said Edmund Daukoru, Nigeria’s oil minister, referring to a more forceful military response.
The lack of security has created demand for private security firms to help oil companies make conditions safer for their workers who are adjusting to a new lifestyle. For example, Triple Canopy, an American security firm founded shortly after the Iraq invasion, opened its first office outside of the Middle East in Lagos last summer.
While the attacks against oil companies have slowed recently, replaced largely by election violence, few analysts believe the militant movement will disappear soon.
Just a few months ago, foreign employees in Port Harcourt, the center for oil operations in the delta, lived in apartments with their families and could relax at local bars, including one popular pub, Goodfellas.
But after a rash of attacks around town last year, families have packed up and gone home, while workers and executives have retreated inside fortified bases surrounded by high walls and razor wire.
On a recent evening, about a dozen men, mainly Italians, settled at the mess inside one such campus here operated by Eni to watch a live soccer game from Rome on satellite television. The 50-acre compound houses offices, dormitories, and some guest houses; there are tennis courts and manicured lawns, a swimming pool and a new gym.
There is also a large field for soccer games between the company team and local soldiers. The cook, the food and the wine come from Italy.
The Eni campus is an oasis compared with the rest of town, a chaotic cluster of five million people. But violence can visit here at any moment, as it did a few months ago when a cellphone-activated car bomb blew up just across the street.
“It’s sad what is going on here,” said Marco Castelli, a manager at Eni, who moved to Nigeria last June. After years living alone in far-flung places like Kazakhstan, Congo and Iran, Mr. Castelli was looking forward to a quiet family assignment in Nigeria. His wife was about to quit her job as a marketing executive for a drug company in Italy to join him.
But soon after he arrived, gunmen entered a bar in Aker Base, a slum outside of Port Harcourt, and kidnapped an Italian worker. An army sergeant was shot dead as he tried to stop the attackers. Later that day, soldiers returned to the scene and razed the village.
The hostage was released the same week, but shortly after that event Mr. Castelli’s wife scrapped her plans to join him.
“The more the situation worsened,” he said, “the more the restrictions became tough.”
Still, many workers here say they are undeterred by the violence and few are considering leaving.
Antonio Fiore, an engineer with Eni, has been confined to the Port Harcourt base since December. In his three decades with the company, Mr. Fiore helped build a refinery in Iraq in the 1970s, worked on a petrochemical plant near the Iranian town of Isfahan in 1989, and spent time in Kuwait after the first gulf war. He has been posted in Nigeria for the last three years.
“What we’re doing here is important,” he said. “I have been in many critical areas. But for us, what happened last year was a nightmare
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by unleashit(m): 10:58am On Apr 24, 2007
@ JoExplorer
a lot of the nigerian security outfit would not want to venture into the niger delta terrain,if you are serious about venturing into that terrain call me on this number +23418902929 between the hours of 8pm and 11pm Nigerian time.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by peteroby(m): 1:02pm On May 10, 2007
hi omoboy,

iam into private security in Nigeria,you can set up your company anywhere in nigeria.and i suggest you venture into Executive protection. why not call me so we can talk or meet to discuss this futher.moreso  northbridgeservices and erinysinternational have no office in Nigeria.if you are serious about starting up a security company come let us talk.and remember that you can;t operate without license.i can be reach at 08038282389 or securitypartner5@hotmail.com
http://bushido.cc/nigeria
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by JoExplorer(m): 4:03am On May 11, 2007
you're right Northbridge has no office in Nigeria, but according to Enriys/Triple Canopys website they have offices in Nigeria.

I have contacts interested in opening offices in Nigeria.
-Can get both Expatriate Man power
-and local probably with the help of Expats in the Area.
-Can get aircraft as well.

primarily interested in securing oil plat forms/ oil pipes.

I will email directly in abit.

1 Like

Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by BOATBOY: 12:09pm On Jun 25, 2007
Omoboy,

Are you still planning on starting a security company in Nigeria? If you are in the planning stages then contact me at the following email address. donjuan6365@aol.com . I am highly interested in your project. I would like to present some ideas to you. Contact me as soon as possible. Thanks.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by cobby(m): 8:25pm On Jul 14, 2007
Jo, kindly privately mail me for an important discussion.Thank you
Franklin Cobbinah
www.texasarmoring.com
corporate email:tac@texasarmoring.com
private email:cobby2k@yahoo.com
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by ipthome(m): 7:03am On Sep 29, 2007
International Business Summits

For

High risk Protection Specialists

June & November 2008

Israel & Jordan

Insight

With Terrorist, separatist, fundamentalist and criminals trying to capitalize on the

advancement of growing nations as they struggle to achieve economic development thru

foreign investment, VIPs and Assets protection operations have become a necessity.

The reality of this massive expansion has brought concern for the Security of developing

investments to the forefront of International corporate strategies because of increasingly

vulnerability.

The need for qualified Protection Specialist capable of providing services related to

Assets protection, Experts, Engineers, Journalists and even UN employees has

multiplied many folds.

Many companies/organizations today are reestablishing themselves in order to fill

the void.

Objectives of the Summits

1. Developing Awareness, Understanding and International recognition in the Ability,

Vitality and Contribution of the civilian security Industry in general and of the High

risk Protection specialist sector who specializes in the provision of VIP’s and assets

protection services in “High risk zones” in particular.

2. Developing Business and professional connections(Networking) among the

participants, thus enabling to provide the best, most efficient, professional and

reliable protection services in general and High risk Protection in particular,

everywhere in the world and for the best price possible for the clients.

3. To help professional and well-qualified High risk Protection specialists to become

more involved and more successful in the field of High risk Protection service.

To obtain these objectives we have freed ourselves of all possible barriers, such as

Religion, Language, Political Conflicts, etc.

Invitees to participate

1. Representatives of the International Press and Media will be invited in order to

expose and involve the public to issues which are the entire public concerns.

2. Independent Protection specialists as well as representatives of protection service

companies and organizations.

3. Security Directors of the “Top 1000” companies from various countries who may

use advanced protection services in various High risk zones worldwide.

From: USA, Europe, Africa (East , Central and West), Russia and CIS countries, Middle

East: Lebanon, Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Iraq, Dubai, Qatar, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, North

Africa: Tunis, Morocco, Algeria , Far East, Latin America (Central and South), Australia.

Issues to be discuss during the Summits:

1. Can we overcome, defeat Terrorism?

2. The role of the Civilian security sector in the world economy developments.

3. “Protection Specialist” or “Soldier of fortune”?

4. Protection personnel qualification requirements for High risk Protection tasks.

5. Can women be active in the High risk protection domain?

6. Exposure of new technologies for High risk protection tasks.

Organizers

The I.P.T, which holds professional and business relationships with many colleagues

around the world, in conjunction with colleagues from Jordan and many other Arab and

Muslim countries will be organizing 2 International Summits for Protection Specialists

who specialize in the provision of High risk Protection services.

Introduction

I.P.T is a Multinational Protection Specialist's Network, which was founded by Mr. Mirza

David the Founder & Executive director of I.S.A - Israel.

The Network associates trainees of the International Security Academy - Israel and

their associates from various countries worldwide.

I.P.T is a NON PROFITABLE Organization

Mr. Mirza David associated the Members in order:

1.To improve the infrastructure for the member's activities worldwide, thus enabling the

members to provide the best, most efficient, professional and reliable Protection services

in general and VIP Protection in particular, everywhere in the world and for the best

price possible for their clients.

2. To help professional and well-qualified Protection personnel to become more involved

and more successful in the field of Protection in their own countries

Summit’s program

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 1 - Friday 27 June 2008 Arrival until 1800

1800 – 1900 – Registration and reception

1900 – 2030 – Dinner

2030 – 2200 – Official opening

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 2 – Saturday 28 June 2008

0900 – 1300 – Presentations/Business introductions by the participants

1300 – 1500 – Lunch break and business meetings

1500 – 1800 – Presentations/Business introductions by the Participants

1800 – 2000 – Dinner break and business meetings (free)

2000 – 2300 – Professional Symposium and business meetings (free)

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 3 – Sunday 29 June 2008

0900 – 1300 – Presentations/Business introductions by the participants

1300 – 1500 – Lunch break and business meetings

1500 – 1800 – Presentations/Business introductions by the Participants

1800 – 2000 – Dinner break

2000 – 2300 – Visiting Tel Aviv & old City of Jaffa by night

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 4 – Monday 30 June 2008

0900 – 1900 – Checking out from hotel Shefayim and departure to Amman - Jordan

Visiting in the way the old city of Jerusalem & Dead sea and crossing the border

near the Palestinian city of Jericho.

1900 – 2000 – Registration and reception in Hotel ___ in Amman – Jordan

2000 – 2100 – Dinner

2100 – 2300 – Official welcome by the Jordanian organizers

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 5 – Tuesday 1 July 2008

0900 – 1300 – Presentation/Business introductions by the Participants

1300 – 1500 – Lunch break and business meetings (free)

1500 – 1800 – Presentation/Business introductions by the Participants

1800 – 2000 – Dinner break and business meetings (free)

2000 – 2400 – Business meetings (free)

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 6 – Wednesday 2 July 2008

0900 – 1700 – Checking out from Hotel and Sightseeing tour to Petra – Jordanian famous special site

1700 – 1900 – Crossing the border to Israel – City of Eilat

1900 – 2100 – Registration and reception in Hotel _______

2100 – 2400 – Closing Dinner with special guests

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 7 – Thursday 3 July 2008

Free time in the city of Eilat

________________________________________________________________________________

Day 8 – Friday 4 July 2008

1200 - Departures, Business meeting or vacation in Eilat – Optional

________________________________________________________________________________







Yoram David
Technical surveillance expert

International Security Academy- Israel
Homeland Security Training Center
Tel +972 9 9500969 Fax +972 9 9573392
www.SecurityAcademy.org.il
www.ipthome.com
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by tadegboye(m): 12:04am On Nov 04, 2007
i want to start a security business in nigeria help!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by tadegboye(m): 12:06am On Nov 04, 2007
Hello everybody i am thinking of starting a security company in Nigeria i will like to know what the requirements are to get a licence
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by Ronaldas: 2:04pm On Oct 17, 2008
Hi everyone readed a lot about people wanting to start security business.
If you really want to start one. Dont forget that you will need

1.Insurance
2.Licence
3.Procedures & policies for security
4.Security forms
5.Training for your guards.

Besides THERE IS licence requirement in Nigeria. Can't remember ho issues licence at the moment, Sorry for that, but you could check out International Institute of Professional Security which is based in Lagos : http://www.iipsonline.org/
You may get valuable information there.
If you are new to all this you can hire professional certified and licensed security consultant or security management company to create yo uall the forms,policies , procedures , manuals etc.etc. and even provide training.
If you dont have money to hire professional security consultant i doubt you will have any to start & run your security business.

If you need help drop me a line on e-mail:
ism@vipservice.lt
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by centurion3: 4:53am On Feb 24, 2009
looking for info regarding starting a security company in nigeria, specializing in maritime security as well as working the delta too
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by iice(f): 10:33am On Apr 01, 2009
So there are many Security companies there?
 
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by ifyalways(f): 11:28am On May 26, 2009
who finally started one and how did he go?
There are lots of security company in abidjan,Ivory coast.its a thriving biz.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by brownbonno(m): 10:35am On May 29, 2009
Firstly get the company incorporated through CAC,then get a Licence by registration through NSCDC(Federal ministry of internal affairs).
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by kasonud(m): 10:59pm On Jun 15, 2009
I have indent experience and professional that manage security companies, you contact me kasonud@yahoo.com if you are serious
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by thomson13: 12:32pm On Jul 21, 2009
hi, i had a dream to open my own business. Had money,but no knowledge what so ever.

After long weeks going true the web i have found number of companies specializing in security.

Initially with little research on all of them i had found this one most reliable:

www.ravaconsulting.com

They did everything for me. Now they are helping me to get my security operations to another country, I'm expanding thanks to them. They are expensive, but as they say you get what you pay for.

I have spent thousands of dollars on "how to start sec. company" but all of them didn't give me as much of knowledge if at all, as Rava consultants did.

Why do i post this link. Because i hope you guys will be also as lucky as i am. Good luck everyone.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by EmmyBoy2(m): 10:08pm On Jul 23, 2009
I'm interested in all of these.I'm a solicitor and once consulted for a group of South Africans who were once interested in the security biz in Nigeria.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by bingo55: 2:52pm On Sep 11, 2009
We are always getting inquiries about starting a security company. After proper licensing requirements are satisfied, and all else is in place, it all comes down to understanding the main objective: to ensure safe and secure living and working environments.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by Ozin(m): 12:47pm On Jun 06, 2010
I am also intersted in starting up a security company in Nigeria.I am based in Australia and intend to visit later this year.I am also looking for partners since i intend to go into,Crowd controller,body guard,static guard and also installation of electronic security apparatus in the corporate world and homes of Nigerians.whoever is interested to go into partnership should contact me on effiongvictor@yahoo.com or facebook on esinumoh@yahoo.com
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by omogidi234(m): 5:29pm On Jun 13, 2010
Well from the legal aspect now, the first step is to register the firm (meanwhile, like a colleague said in one of his posts in business section, u would require an approval in principle from the organisation saddled with the responsibility of issuing licence to Private security companies in Naija before CAC can register your firm. Please bear in mind as well that in Lag any licence issued to you by FG could be supported by another one issued by LASG). If you would like us to do the registration and licence aspect please holla at Kleandenation@yahoo.ca.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by joeleitz(m): 12:47am On Sep 08, 2010
Ronaldas:

Hi everyone readed a lot about people wanting to start security business.
If you really want to start one. Dont forget that you will need

1.Insurance
2.Licence
3.Procedures & policies for security
4.Security forms
5.Training for your guards.

Besides THERE IS licence requirement in Nigeria. Can't remember ho issues licence at the moment,  Sorry for that, but you could check out International Institute of Professional Security which is based in Lagos  :    http://www.iipsonline.org/
You may get valuable information there.
If you are new to all this you can hire professional certified and licensed security consultant or security management company to create yo uall the forms,policies , procedures , manuals etc.etc. and even provide training.
If you dont have money to hire professional security consultant i doubt you will have any to start & run your security business.

If you need help drop me a line on e-mail:
ism@vipservice.lt

Yes licences are VERY important. Running without the licence you need is so BAD.

This is not the kind of market you dabble in friends. Take this very seriously.
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by anijummai(f): 1:40am On Oct 03, 2010
Hi Jo Explorer. I notice its been a while since you posted anything on nairaland, but i'll really like to get in touch with you on this security company business and i can't seem to find and email address or any other means of reaching you so i hope you get to see this and respond. My email address is anijummai@gmail.com
Re: Starting A Security Company In Nigeria by citisecure: 7:28pm On Jul 01, 2011
I am a 29 years old successful Nigerian Security Director and Trainer in the United Kingdom, I am also planning to start this firm in Nigeria, my personal website is www.bukolaogundipe.com for my information and my business in UK is www.citisecure.co.uk, I hope we can do the Nigeria Security Project together or If you need a classic trainer, I am will offer you the best service.

I am qualified to train:

CCTV Operator (to use CCTV)
Door Supervisors (aka Bouncers)
Security Guards
Vehicle Immobiliser
Private Investigator
Forensic Experts
Football Stewards
Usher
Warden
Traffic Operatives etc, 
(I can train up to 50 Candidates at a time)

I can supply Forensic equipment for security companies, I also can have CCTV installed in your house,office(anywhere) and you'll watch from your phone (at anytime).

I have Profitably Managed CITISECURE for 5 years and I have recently been invited to Nigeria to analyse and plan Security Training for one of the Big Security Company in Nigeria(Not delivered yet).

You can call me anytime. But If I am busy leave a message, I have trained over 2000 Nigerian and 5000 other nationals in UK and Process Licenses for them in UK within the last 365 days. I have a base in UK and also plotted a base in Lagos, get in touch!!!

Tel: +44788 40 800


---------------------------------

Hello,

We have started the setting-up the Nigeria Security Company www.999security.com, 999 Security will carter for all Security need across Nigeria with head office in Lagos and Central Head in Abuja.

The setting up process is expected to take approximately 6 months, to be completed by or before mid-2012

We will deliver training for:
Security trainers
Event Stewards
Bouncers
CCTV Operatives
Private Investigators
Cash & Valuable Operatives
Security Guards
Hotel & Bank Guards
(Up to United Kingdom Standard; Once in a month from March 2012)


999 Security will start supplying and employment of trained
Event Stewards
Bouncers
CCTV Operatives
Private Investigators
Cash & Valuable Operatives
Security Guards
Hotel & Bank Guards
(from 2nd week in March 2012)


999 Security (Nigeria) will also offer services like:

CCTV Sales, Installation and Servicing
Car hire & Chauffeur Services

To employ any of our services or for more information & Partnership contact
support@999security.com
Nig Office: 080 99 16 999 0 (Reserved Line)
UK Office: 0870 766 9645

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