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Nigeria Law For Divorce - Family (1) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Family / Nigeria Law For Divorce (29170 Views)

Dino Melaye's Wife Files For Divorce + Proof Of Assault Domestic Violence (PIC) / Top Ten Reason For Divorce In 2012 / Attacked By Father- In -law For Catching My Wife Having An Affair. (1) (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by africarose(f): 6:08pm On May 27, 2007
Ok, my husband came here from Nigeria, (the people that helped him come here to the U.S. got his green card for him). Before him and I got married I had him show me a proof of divorce before I would marry him. Do the divorced couple still have contact like they would still be married (as in still consider each other married)? Since there is proof of divorce is it still carried out in Nigeria?
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by BlackMamba(m): 2:05am On May 29, 2007
africarose:
My husband came here from Nigeria. Before him and I got married, I had him show me a proof of divorce before I would marry him. Do the divorced couple still have contact like they would still be married (as in still consider each other married)? Since there is proof of divorce is it still carried out in Nigeria?

Divorce ends marriage globally, including Nigeria. Unless you have reason to suspect your hubby of fraud, divorce means divorce.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by africarose(f): 2:09am On May 29, 2007
Thank you for your comment

Is it common to have the last name spelt different from Nigeria than it is here in the U.S.? What I mean is, there is a letter added in his last name. Is that something common when going to another country?
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by BlackMamba(m): 2:18am On May 29, 2007
In Nigeria, a man does not change his name as a result of marriage or divorce. A woman changing her last name after marriage is the norm, just like in the West.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by africarose(f): 2:26am On May 29, 2007
Thank you BlackMomba

When I saw his last name on his divorce papers there was a letter missing, for example, if there were 2 L's in the last name on his green card and on divorce paper/decree there was only 1. Is it a legal divorce?
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by africarose(f): 2:48am On May 29, 2007
embarassed I'm so sorry BlackMamba I had just noticed that I had a typo with your name. Please forgive, embarassed
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by BlackMamba(m): 3:08am On May 29, 2007
Obviously you're overthinking this issue. Unless you have reason to suspect this guy, such minor discrepancies has nothing to do with the authenticity of his divorce in Nigeria. If he claims to have obtained a formal divorce in a Nigerian court, it is same form and substance as obtained in the West. If you really believe that his purported divorce is fake, scrutinizing the divorce decree for typos may not help. Unfortunately, he can produce a Nigerian divorce decree which you may be unable to verify.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by africarose(f): 3:12am On May 29, 2007
Thank you for your help BlackMamba.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by pmdaboh(f): 4:55am On May 29, 2007
Hello. I am African American and married a Nigerian man January 4, 2007. He and my stepson have been approved to come to the states by Immigration. He is now waiting for his interview to finalize everthing.

I think your question, although worded well, does not really ask what you need to know. When you have to fill out your petitions on behalf of your husband to come to America, they will REQUIRE that he provide them with legal divorce papers. My husband was married before, and he got married in the African tradition and divorced in the African tradition. However, after I read the requirments for submitting the I130 Petition and the I129F Petition to bring my husband over to America, it clearly states that if your spouse is previously married, he/she must submit "DIVORCE" papers. Therefore, it may not be required in Africa, but it sure is required in America. Get him to hire a lawyer and get a legal divorce (English translation, for that is the only accepted version).

Take my word for it, if he does not have a legal divorce on paper, you will NEVER be able to process him into the United States.

I am working on an article entitled, "Going Through The Immigration Process To Bring Your Nigerian Husband To America", for many women have contacted me due to the article I wrote and submitted on Nigerians In America entitled, "Rejected For Loving A Nigerian Man". My Article, which I plan on submitting on Nigerians In America (it has to be approved before it is visible to the public), outlines all the necessary steps in getting your Nigerian husband over to America after you marry him in Nigeria. It shows how to do it successfully and in the shortest turn around time possible that my experience has taught me.

I will also post it here as an attachment, so look out for the topic.

Best wishes to you and your love!
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by spoilt(f): 4:58am On May 29, 2007
we dont have laws in nigeria. im not kidding you. men people do what they want when it comes to marriage and divorce and numerous wives et al.
be careful. be very careful. some men will marry a foreign women whom they have never even seen just for the almighty american citizenship.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by africarose(f): 8:29am On May 29, 2007
Thank you pmdaboh, I will look forward to your link,

And spoilt,
I did not help him get his citizenship. He had gotten it through the company that he had come here through. And we had met here in America. I know what pmdaboh was talking about. I was with him at the time he became a citizen and all the things he had gone through. He did show me the divorce papers. The only thing I was basically enquiring about basically was why the last name is spelt different from now.

I know when I had family come here from another country the name had a letter taken out "after" they got here due to noone could spell it right. But in this case there was a letter added instead of taken out.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by Emad(f): 3:54pm On Jan 23, 2008
With All due respect Africarose
i think you should reverify those divorce papers
We Nigerians are experts on 419 ( fraud )
it is possible he took some one else's divorce papers to show you.

Nigerians are conservative and i really think one in 1000 Nigerians will actually divorce their wife, just like that
besides court processes are long and Divorce is not always as easy to obtain from the court as we pretend
That letter missing thing is suspicious

I hope i am not talking too late
undecided
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by BlackMamba(m): 2:55am On Feb 14, 2008
Emad:
We [/b]Nigerians are experts on 419 ( fraud )

[b]With all undue respect Emad,
an ignorant sis like you should not have access to the internet to avoid such dumb characterization of a nation of over 130 million.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by vigasimple(m): 2:24am On Feb 15, 2008
BlackMamba:

With all undue respect Emad, an ignorant sis like you should not have access to the internet to avoid such dumb characterization of a nation of over 130 million.



I think you have not only answer EMAD rightfully but also some of our other brothers and sisters who all they can think of is 419's instead of answering the questions.

Divorce or not divorce and couple getting married has nothing to do with reisdency/green card and citizenship.

We may not know, the guy may have been a reisdent or citizen as in Africarose husband before they got married.

And in any event the Poster would have done her own due dilligence as to whether she sufficiently trust and love the guy enough that she is not just being used but loved.

I will like that we should try and caution ourselves and stop jumping to conclusion that everybody (as in Nigerians) getting married to somebody in UK or America is doing so for papers. It may even be possible that the poster herself is the one looking for papers from this guy. or does anyone not think along those lines?

When we type anything on this site we should not think about the questions the posters is asking us but also apply wisdom in answering.

If the poster wanted to know if  she is being used i am sure she will have ask that question.

Nice reply anyway by BlackMamba
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by Emad(f): 9:57am On Feb 15, 2008
BlackMamba:

With all undue respect Emad, an ignorant sis like you should not have access to the internet to avoid such dumb characterization of a nation of over 130 million.



I understand you perfectly, "truth Hurts"
I feel the same myself sometimes, but i am woman enough to FACE IT
You could learn something from me
We were all thinking it, i just said it aloud wink
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by BlackMamba(m): 9:37pm On Feb 16, 2008
@Emad,
What you regard as "truth" is only your limited understanding of the facts. The fact that some Nigerians use fraud to better their lives, which by the way is obtainable of every other nationality, does not make it the "truth", applicable to most Nigerians.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by Emad(f): 10:00am On Feb 20, 2008
Who talked about MOST?? U did not i, sad
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by almondjoy(f): 6:26am On Feb 21, 2008
@poster

Please verify all legal ties before you marry this man.  Like mamaput said, it depends on the type of marriage. There is not such thing as "auto divorce"!

The dangers of this kinds of relationships is that you can never verify how many wives and children a man has had especially coming from a foreign country.  He may have one or several if he is a polygamist.

Ask him if he had a "church" ceremony. Or one from the "registry".  You will need to get "divorce" papers his country to prove that he is truly divorced before you get married over here.  If he had one or several traditional marriages, that is of no significance for you since you cannot obtain a "divorce" certificate for a traditional ceremony.

All in all, this situation is tricky. I would prefer he put a fresh divorce over here in the states, which usually takes less than 90days I believe. That way I can have an authenticated divorce decree in my hands instead of one that might be fraudulent from another foreign country. Hopefully, this guy can come clean and tell you how many types of marriages he has had in other countries too if any.

Goodluck! kiss
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by Egobetter: 7:14am On Mar 22, 2008
Just wanted to talk about a friend's experience with naija divorce.

She was not served a formal process or papers or anything. All she knew was that her he was going to do the divorce in naija. Don't know why, but I suspect he didn't want to spend any money to do it here in the states.

They both reside in the states and he is a citizen. To cut long tory short, He has already started turning in the papers and removing her from all the spousal benefits. He still would not give her a copy, so she managed to get one from his boss. In the papers, she is alleged to have APPOINTED a SO-CALLED REPRESENTATIVE, to act on her behalf (totally false). In addition, the papers only mention that the marriage was native law and custom, whereas the marriage was conducted at a registry with signatures and witnesses. Finally the papers claimed that my friend had plead LIABLE(?) to the charges and the marriage was therefore dissolved. In spite of the fact the man has never provided housing for the kids, nor has he seen them up to 10 times since they were born, he claimed sole custody of both of them. The kids DO NOT and have never lived with him because he said that he didn't plan for kids.

Let me add that the marriage was conducted in one state, 'divorce' was from a magistrate court in another state, where neither one has resided in. At least not my friend. The content of the paper had a lot of grammatical errors and what I believe to be typos, but he presented it and they accepted it here in the states.

She has forwarded the letter to an attorney in naija and is filing for a divorce by herself in the states.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by BTT(m): 6:49pm On May 02, 2008
@EMAD:

I think BlackMamba answered you right. Methink you should refocus your thinking. You assume you know, when infact the reverse is the case.

@BlackMamber:

Lol.

@Poster:

My suggestion is that you contact some of his relatives. Theirt response will do the trick.

You may also 'steal' the 'divorced' wife's contact - phone number, email, postal addy, etc - and speak with her yourself. Every thing will fall in2 its rightful place.

Nigerians are wonderful lovers, and wonderful indeed we are. Thank you for trying us.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by brownbonno(m): 10:19am On May 03, 2008
spoilt:

we don't have laws in nigeria. im not kidding you. men people do what they want when it comes to marriage and divorce and numerous wives et al.
be careful. be very careful. some men will marry a foreign women whom they have never even seen just for the almighty american citizenship.

Its a shame that your shenaniganish thoughts is been displayed in a public forum like Nairaland.It best discribe the type of minds that rove around NL.There is no need exposing your ignorance in a bid to respond on a a topic.
As for the Traditional marriage it is covered by the customary law(that speaks for its self)

FYI
Nieria have a law on matrimonial matters.


Matrimonial Causes Act

Chapter 220

Laws of the Federation of Nigeria 1990




Dissolution of marriage





15. (1) A petition under this Act by a party to a marriage for a decree of dissolution of the marriage may be presented to the court by either party to the marriage upon the ground that the marriage has broken down irretrievably.



(2) The court hearing a petition for a decree of dissolution of a marriage shall hold the marriage to have broken down irretrievably if, but only if, the petitioner satisfies the court of one or more of the following facts-



(a) that the respondent has wilfully and persistently refused to consummate the marriage;



(b) that since the marriage the Respondent has committed adultery and the petitioner finds it intolerable to live with the respondent;



(c) that since the marriage the respondent has behaved in such a way that the petitioner cannot reasonably be expected to live with the respondent;



(d) that the respondent has deserted the petitioner for a continuous period of at least one year immediately preceding the presentation of the petition;



(e) that the parties to the marriage have lived apart for a continuous period of at least two years immediately preceding the presentation of the petition and the respondent does not object to a decree being granted;



(f) that the parties to the marriage have lived apart for a continuous period of at least three years immediately preceding the presentation of the petition;



(g) that the other party to the marriage has, for a period of not less than one year failed to comply with a decree or restitution of conjugal rights made under this Act;



(h) that the other party to the marriage has been absent from the petitioner for such time and in such circumstances as to provide reasonable grounds for presuming that he or she is dead.



(3) For the purpose of subsection (2) (e) and (f) of this section the parties to a marriage shall be treated as living apart unless they are living with each other in the same household.



16. (1) Without prejudice to the generality of section 15(2)(c) of this Act, the court hearing a petition for a decree to of dissolution of marriage shall hold that the petitioner has satisfied the court of the fact mentioned in the said section 15(2)(c) of this Act if the petitioner satisfies the court that-



(a) since the marriage, the respondent has committed molest, sodomy, or bestiality; or



(b) since the marriage, the respondent has, for a period of not less than two years-



(i) been a habitual drunkard, or



(ii) habitually been intoxicated by reason of taking or using to excess any sedative, narcotic or stimulating drug or preparation, or has, for a part or parts of such a period, been a habitual drunkard and has, for the other part or parts of the period, habitually been so intoxicated; or



(c) since the marriage, the respondent has within a period not exceeding five years-



(i) suffered frequent convictions for crime in respect of which the respondent has been sentenced in the aggregate to imprisonment for not less than three years, and



(ii) habitually left the petitioner without reason- able means of support; or



(d) since the marriage, the respondent has been in prison for a period of not less than three years after conviction for an offence punishable by death or imprisonment for life or for a period of five years or more, and is still in prison at the date of the petition; or



(e) since the marriage and within a period of one year immediately preceding the date of the petition, the respondent has been convicted of-



(i) having attempted to murder or unlawfully to kill the petitioner, or



(ii) having committed an offence involving the intentional infliction of grievous harm or grievous hurt on the petitioner or the intent to inflict grievous harm or grievous hurt on the petitioner;



(f) or the respondent has habitually and wilfully failed, throughout the period of two years immediately preceding the date of the petition, to pay maintenance for the petitioner-



(i) ordered to be paid under an order of, or an order registered in, a court in the Federation, or



(ii) agreed to be paid under an agreement between the parties to the marriage providing for their separation; or



(g) the respondent-



(i) is, at the date of the petition, of unsound mind and unlikely to recover, and



(ii) since the marriage and within the period of six ears immediately preceding the date of the petition, as been confined for a period of, or for periods aggregating, not less than five years in an institution where persons may be confined for unsoundness of mind in accordance with law, or in more than one such institution.



(2) Where a petition is based on the fact mentioned in section 15(2)(h) of this Act-



(a) proof that, for a period of seven years immediately preceding the date of the petition, the other party to the marriage was continually absent from the petitioner and that the petitioner has no reason to believe that the other party was alive at any time within that period is sufficient to establish the fact in question, unless it is shown that the other party to the marriage was alive at a time within that period; and



(b) a decree made pursuant to the petition shall be in the form of a decree of dissolution of marriage by reason of presumption of death.



17. (1) Where the petitioner alleges that the respondent has behaved in such a way that the petitioner cannot reasonably be expected to live with him but the parties to the marriage have lived with each other for a period or periods after the date of the occurrence of the final incident relied on by the petitioner and held by the court to support his allegation, that fact shall be disregarded in determining for the purposes of section 15(2)(c) of this Act whether the petitioner cannot reasonably be expected to live with the respondent if the length of that period or of those periods together was six months or less.



(2) In considering for the purposes of section 15(2) of this Act whether the period for which the respondent has deserted the petitioner or the period for which the parties to a marriage have lived apart has been continuous, no account shall be taken of any one period (not exceeding six months) or of any two or more periods (not exceeding six months in all) during which the parties resumed living with each other, but no period during which the parties lived with each other shall count as part of the period of desertion or of the period for which the parties to the marriage lived apart, as the case may be.



(3) References in this section to the parties to a marriage living with each other shall be construed as references to their living with each other in the same household.



18. A married person whose conduct constitutes just cause or excuse for the other party to the marriage to live separately or apart, and occasions that other party to live separately or apart, shall be deemed to have wilfully deserted that other party without just cause or excuse, notwithstanding that that person may not in fact have intended the conduct to occasion that other party to live separately or apart.



19. (1) Where husband and wife are parties to an agreement for separation, whether oral, in writing or constituted by conduct, the refusal by one of them, without reasonable justification, to comply with the other's bona fide request to resume cohabitation shall constitute, as from the date of the refusal, wilful desertion without just cause or excuse on the part of the party so refusing.



(2) For the purposes of this section, "reasonable justification" means justification that is reasonable in all the circumstances, including the conduct of the other party to the marriage since the marriage, whether that conduct took place before or after the agreement for separation.



20. Where a party to a marriage has been wilfully deserted by the other party, the desertion shall not be deemed to have been terminated by reason only that the deserting party has become incapable of forming or having an intention to continue the desertion, if it appears to the court that the desertion would probably havecontinued if the deserting party had not become so incapable.



21. The court shall not find that a respondent has wilfully and persistently refused to consummate the marriage unless the court is satisfied that, as at the commencement of the hearing of the petition, the marriage had not been consummated.



22. Where-



(a) a person has been sentenced to imprisonment in respect of each of two or more crimes that, in the opinion of the court hearing the petition, arose substantially out of the same acts or omissions; and



(b) the sentences were ordered to be served, in whole or in part, concurrently, then, in reckoning for the purposes of section 16(l) (c) of this Act the period for which that person has been sentenced in the aggregate, any period during which two or more of those sentences were to be served concurrently shall be taken into account once only.



23. A finding in accordance with section 16(l) (f) of this Act shall not be made unless the court is satisfied that reasonable attempts have been made by the petitioner to enforce the order or agreement under which maintenance was ordered or agreed to be paid.



24. A finding in accordance with section 16(l) (g) of this Act shall not be made unless the court is satisfied that, at the commencement of the hearing of the petition, the respondent was still confined in an institution referred to in the said section 16(l) (g) and was unlikely to recover.



25. On the application of the respondent made in the course of proceedings for a decree of dissolution of marriage, the court may, if it considers it just and proper in the circumstances of the case to make provision for the maintenance of the respondent or other provision for the benefit of the respondent, refuse to make a decree unless and until it is satisfied that the petitioner has made arrangements satisfactory to the court to provide the maintenance or other benefit as aforesaid upon the decree becoming absolute.



26. Except where section 16(l) (g) of this Act applies, a decree of dissolution of marriage shall not be made if the petitioner has condoned or connived at the conduct constituting the facts on which the petition is based.



27. A decree of dissolution of marriage shall not be made if the petitioner, in bringing or prosecuting the proceedings, has been guilty of Collusion with intent to cause a perversion of justice.



28. The court may, in its discretion, refuse to make a decree of dissolution of marriage if since the marriage-



(a) the petitioner has committed adultery that has not been condoned by the respondent or, having been so condoned, has been revived;



(b) the petitioner has wilfully deserted the respondent before the happening of the matters relied upon by the petitioner or, where those matters involve other matters occurring during, or extending over, a period, before the expiration of that period; or



(c) the habits of the petitioner have, or the conduct of the petitioner has, conduced or contributed to the existence of the matters relied upon by the petitioner.



29. Where both a petition for a decree of nullity of a marriage and a petition for a decree of dissolution of that marriage are before a court, the court shall not make a decree of dissolution of the marriage unless it has dismissed the petition for a decree of nullity of the marriage.



30. (1) Subject to this section, proceedings for a decree of dissolution of marriage shall not be instituted within two years after the date of the marriage except by leave of the court.



(2) Nothing in this section shall apply to the institution of proceedings based on any of the matters specified in section 15(2) (a) or (b) or 16(l) (a) of this Act, or to the institution of proceedings for a decree of dissolution of marriage by way of cross-proceedings.



(3) The court shall not grant leave under this section to institute proceedings except on the ground that to refuse to grant the leave would impose exceptional hardship on the applicant or that the case is one involving exceptional depravity on the part of the other party to the marriage.



(4) In determining an application for leave to institute proceedings under this section, the court shall have regard to the interest of any children of the marriage, and to the question whether there is any reasonable probability of a reconciliation between the parties before the expiration of the period of two years after the date of the marriage.



(5) Where, at the hearing of proceedings that have been instituted by leave of the court under this section, the court is satisfied that the leave was obtained by misrepresentation or concealment of material facts, the court may-



(a) adjourn the hearing for such period as the court thinks fit; or



(b) dismiss the petition on the ground that the leave was so obtained.



(6) Where, in a case to which subsection (5) of this section applies, there is a cross-petition, if the court adjourns or dismisses the petition under that subsection, it shall also adjourn for the same period, or dismiss, as the case may be, the cross-petition; but if the court, having regard to the provisions of this section, thinks it proper to hear and determine the cross-petition, it may do so, and in that case it shall also hear and determine the petition.



(7) The dismissal of a petition or a cross-petition under subsection (5) or (6) of this section shall not prejudice any subsequent proceedings on the same, or substantially the same, facts as those constituting the ground on which the dismissed petition or cross-petition was brought.



(cool Nothing in this section shall prevent the institution of proceedings, after the period of two years from the date of the marriage, based upon matters which have occurred within that period.



(9) In this section, a reference to the leave of the court shall be deemed to include a reference to leave granted by a court on appeal.



31. (1) A party to a marriage, whether husband or wife may, in a petition for a decree of dissolution of the marriage alleging that the other party to the marriage has committed adultery with a person or including that allegation, claim damages from that person on the ground that that person has committed adultery with the other party to the marriage and, subject to this section, the court may award damages accordingly.



(2) The court shall not award damages against a person where the adultery of the respondent with that person has been condoned, whether subsequently revived or not, or if a decree of dissolution of the marriage based on the fact of the adultery of the respondent with that person, or on facts including that fact, is not made.



(3) Damages shall not be awarded under this Act in respect of an act of adultery committed more than three years before the date of the petition.



(4) The court may direct in what manner the damages awarded shall be paid or applied and may, if it thinks fit, direct that they shall be settled for the benefit of the respondent or the children of the marriage.



32. (1) Where, in a petition for a decree of dissolution of marriage or in an answer to such a petition, a party to the marriage is alleged to have committed adultery with a specified person, whether or not a decree of dissolution of marriage is sought on the basis of that allegation, that per- son shall, except as provided by rules of court, be made a party to the proceedings.



(2) Where, in a petition for a decree of dissolution of marriage or in an answer to such a petition, a party to the Marriage is alleged to have committed molest or sodomy on or with a specified person, whether or not a decree of dissolution of marriage is sought on the basis of that allegation, that person shall, except as provided by rules of court, be served with notice that the allegation has been made and is thereupon entitled to intervene in the proceedings.



(3) Where a person has been made a party to proceedings for a decree of dissolution of marriage in pursuance of subsection (1) above, the court may, on the application of that person, if it is satisfied after the close of the case for the party to the marriage who alleged the adultery that there is not sufficient evidence to establish that that person ommitted adultery with the other party to the marriage, dismiss that person from the proceedings.



33. Where a decree of dissolution of marriage under this Act has become absolute, a party to the marriage may marry again as if the marriage had been dissolved by death.



Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by spoilt(f): 4:25pm On May 03, 2008
Blah blah blah to you mr brownbono.
We all know what our "laws" say. Thank you. And oh, thank you for copying and pasting the epistle! How many people live by the law in nigeria? how many go through proper divorce proceedings? How many people even marry 'properly' to start with? When i said we have no laws in nigeria i was being sarcastic .so please quit trying to morph into voltron to behead me.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by brownbonno(m): 5:19pm On May 03, 2008
spoilt,

Hahahahahahhaha
You still remain my sister.
stay blessed.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by spoilt(f): 7:35pm On May 03, 2008
I am. wink
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by vronnie(f): 8:02pm On Jul 01, 2008
he needs to apply for a divorce in whatever state he is living in. this means that if she is in nigeria she has to be served and the papersneed to come back if they don't because she is out of the country there is a 90 day wait to see the judge .then follow thru from there .no there is no such thing as an automatic divorce it won't stand up here in the us.
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by Udode(f): 9:57am On Jul 02, 2008
Let me give you this advice.
Why don't you suggest to get married in nigeria - traditional wedding.

This one is for certain, if he accepts, he is not trying to play a game, because
traditional mariage you only get once!
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by spoilt(f): 1:43am On Jul 03, 2008
Udode:

Let me give you this advice.
Why don't you suggest to get married in nigeria - traditional wedding.

This one is for certain, if he accepts, he is not trying to play a game, because
traditional mariage you only get once!

once ke? which part of naija are you from? grin
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by Udode(f): 6:29am On Jul 03, 2008
im not from nigeria at all!
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by misra: 3:53am On Jul 24, 2008
is there an institution like a civil registry where i can check if a nigerian man is already married.? theres a woman who keeps calling but he denies he is married i already asked the woman once but she never answered but he said they have a kid but refused to admit of being married
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by LAKANYE(m): 4:46am On Jul 24, 2008
misra:

is there an institution like a civil registry where i can check if a nigerian man is already married.? theres a woman who keeps calling but he denies he is married i already asked the woman once but she never answered but he said they have a kid but refused to admit of being married

HMMN, CIVL REGISTRY, HMMN, IN NIGERIA?

YES, I KNOW ONE.

GO TO NAIRALAND.COM.
TYPE IN THE CULPRIT'S FULL NAME, SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS, FULL ADDRESS, AND ATTARCH A COPY OF HIS OR HER RECENT CREDIT REPORTS. THEN WAIT FOR THREE MONTHS FOR YOUR SEARCH RESULTS TO BE POSTED.


ONE THING I KNOW ABOUT NIGERIAN MARRIAGES BE SAY, ONCE YOU GET BELLE FOR A MAN, YOU ARE AUTOMATICALLY MARRIED TO THAT MAN.

OUR REGISTRY NA FOR FOR MARKET WOMEN MOUTH WEY SABI YOU WELL WELL FOR YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by LAKANYE(m): 4:48am On Jul 24, 2008
Udode:

im not from nigeria at all!

GHANA MUST GO

EVEN A MAN WEY NO COME FROM NIGERIA DEY TALK ABOUT NIGERIA??
Re: Nigeria Law For Divorce by HCH3COO: 4:49am On Jul 24, 2008
LAKANYE~:


EVEN A MAN WEY NO COME FROM NIGERIA DEY TALK ABOUT NIGERIA??

what's your point dumbass?

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