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Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer - Programming - Nairaland

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Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by thewebcraft(m): 5:55pm On Jul 17, 2015
Not everyone is cut out to be a programmer. Sure, anyone can learn how to program, but learning how to program is not the same as making a career out of it. In fact, it’s entirely possible to be a talented coder and still be a mismatch for the career. It sounds strange, I know, but it’s truer than you might think.

There’s more to it than the act of coding. You have to consider the entire picture. If you aren’t completely sure that you’re meant to be a programmer, here are some signs that may point you in the right direction.

Sign #1: You Lack Experimental Creativity

Despite being heavy on the logic, programming is ultimately a creative art. A new program is like a blank canvas and your paintbrushes are your languages, frameworks, libraries, etc. You’re creating something out of nothing and this is a process that hinges on experimental fearlessness.

Dogmatic coders will tell you that there’s “one true way” to write good code, but that’s not true at all. Such a statement is as nonsensical as saying there’s only one way to build a house, write a novel, or cook a stew. There are many ways to code software and you should be willing to experiment.

Without natural curiosity, you’ll develop tunnel vision and always approach your coding problems from the same angle. At that point, programming becomes rote work and loses much of what makes it rewarding in the first place.

Sign #2: You Are Not Self-Driven

All good programmers need to be self-driven and there’s no way around this. When you strip away all of the extraneous details, programming is fundamentally repetitive. If you have no personal stake or ambition in the code you write, then you’re just going to be miserable.

This is true of any creative endeavor (and no matter what anyone says, programming is creative). Your motivation to write code has to come from within. You have to love the act of coding just as much as the potential for walking away with a final product. If you don’t love the process, you’ll never reach the product.
If you wake up in the morning and you don’t feel a burning desire to work on your project, perhaps programming is not the right outlet for you.

Sign #3: You Hate Logic Problems

Despite being a creative endeavor, programming is more about fixing than it is creating. While other creative outlets do involve a fixing process (such as writers who need to revise their drafts), programming is unique in that most of the problems that pop up are based on logic-based faults.

This fixing process, known properly as debugging, is the heart of programming. Are you fascinated by riddles and logic puzzles? Do you have an innate desire to repair that which is broken? And by extension, are you naturally inquisitive about the inner workings of things? You should be able to answer “Yes” to all of the above.

Much of the reward in programming comes from fixing bugs. The more complicated the bug, the more rewarding it is when you finally solve it. If you find no satisfaction in this, then programming will be nothing more than an endless string of frustrations.

Sign #4: You Can’t Sit For Long Periods

The nature of programming requires that you sit in front of a computer for extended lengths of time. You may be able to work around it by building a standing desk but the essence is the same: you’re going to spend a lot of time in front of your computer.

There are some concerns when it comes to this kind of computer-related sedentary lifestyle and it can lead to serious health issues if you ignore it for too long. Along similar lines, you may have to wrestle with mental issues like unwanted distractions, cabin fever, and lapses in productivity.

Ultimately, the question is: are you comfortable being in front of a computer for most of your day? In fact, comfortable may not be enough; you have to prefer being in front of a computer. If not, productivity and happiness are going to be uphill battles.

Sign #5: You Want Normal Work Hours

Programming careers fall into one of two types: 1) you work for someone else or 2) you work for yourself. Either way, it’s not uncommon to hear stories of late nights, long coding sessions, and an overall low quality of life.

Software development is a deadline-centric industry and deadlines don’t play nicely with traditional 9-to-5 work days. As deadlines loom closer, coding teams often enter a phase of “crunch time” defined by all-nighters. Even when working for yourself, you’ll have to pour in many daily hours if you want to stay ahead of your competition.

In addition, programming problems tend to get stuck in your brain and follow you around everywhere you go. You’ll be working through solutions while in the shower, while commuting, and even while lying in bed. Because so much of programming happens in your head, compartmentalization can be difficult if not impossible.

If you’re lucky you may be able to find a company that doesn’t do crunch time, but I wouldn’t count on it.

Sign #6: You Expect To Get Rich Quick

There was a time when software development was a lucrative pursuit. Nowadays, programmers who get rich quick are the exception to the rule. If your primary motivation for being in this industry is to make a lot of money in the shortest amount of time, you’re in for some disappointment.

Overnight success stories, such as the popularity of Flappy Bird, can lure us into false expectations and delusional confidence. A lot of people have tried their hand at indie game development in the hopes of striking similar levels of success only to flop and

11 Likes 1 Share

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Vanquay: 5:56pm On Jul 17, 2015
undecided
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by bunmioguns(m): 5:58pm On Jul 17, 2015
hmm.. watching
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Futureleader1(m): 5:59pm On Jul 17, 2015
All hail the rising stars programmers of the land of the rising sun
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by FincoApps(m): 6:07pm On Jul 17, 2015
It's true sha, I agree. By the way you tried for this article o shocked shocked shocked
thewebcraft:
Not everyone is cut out to be a programmer. Sure, anyone can learn how to program, but learning how to program is not the same as making a career out of it. In fact, it’s entirely possible to be a talented coder and still be a mismatch for the career. It sounds strange, I know, but it’s truer than you might think.

There’s more to it than the act of coding. You have to consider the entire picture. If you aren’t completely sure that you’re meant to be a programmer, here are some signs that may point you in the right direction.

Sign #1: You Lack Experimental Creativity

Despite being heavy on the logic, programming is ultimately a creative art. A new program is like a blank canvas and your paintbrushes are your languages, frameworks, libraries, etc. You’re creating something out of nothing and this is a process that hinges on experimental fearlessness.

Dogmatic coders will tell you that there’s “one true way” to write good code, but that’s not true at all. Such a statement is as nonsensical as saying there’s only one way to build a house, write a novel, or cook a stew. There are many ways to code software and you should be willing to experiment.

Without natural curiosity, you’ll develop tunnel vision and always approach your coding problems from the same angle. At that point, programming becomes rote work and loses much of what makes it rewarding in the first place.
Ads by Google

Sign #2: You Are Not Self-Driven

All good programmers need to be self-driven and there’s no way around this. When you strip away all of the extraneous details, programming is fundamentally repetitive. If you have no personal stake or ambition in the code you write, then you’re just going to be miserable.

This is true of any creative endeavor (and no matter what anyone says, programming is creative). Your motivation to write code has to come from within. You have to love the act of coding just as much as the potential for walking away with a final product. If you don’t love the process, you’ll never reach the product.
If you wake up in the morning and you don’t feel a burning desire to work on your project, perhaps programming is not the right outlet for you.

Sign #3: You Hate Logic Problems

Despite being a creative endeavor, programming is more about fixing than it is creating. While other creative outlets do involve a fixing process (such as writers who need to revise their drafts), programming is unique in that most of the problems that pop up are based on logic-based faults.

This fixing process, known properly as debugging, is the heart of programming. Are you fascinated by riddles and logic puzzles? Do you have an innate desire to repair that which is broken? And by extension, are you naturally inquisitive about the inner workings of things? You should be able to answer “Yes” to all of the above.

Much of the reward in programming comes from fixing bugs. The more complicated the bug, the more rewarding it is when you finally solve it. If you find no satisfaction in this, then programming will be nothing more than an endless string of frustrations.

Sign #4: You Can’t Sit For Long Periods

The nature of programming requires that you sit in front of a computer for extended lengths of time. You may be able to work around it by building a standing desk but the essence is the same: you’re going to spend a lot of time in front of your computer.

There are some concerns when it comes to this kind of computer-related sedentary lifestyle and it can lead to serious health issues if you ignore it for too long. Along similar lines, you may have to wrestle with mental issues like unwanted distractions, cabin fever, and lapses in productivity.

Ultimately, the question is: are you comfortable being in front of a computer for most of your day? In fact, comfortable may not be enough; you have to prefer being in front of a computer. If not, productivity and happiness are going to be uphill battles.

Sign #5: You Want Normal Work Hours

Programming careers fall into one of two types: 1) you work for someone else or 2) you work for yourself. Either way, it’s not uncommon to hear stories of late nights, long coding sessions, and an overall low quality of life.

Software development is a deadline-centric industry and deadlines don’t play nicely with traditional 9-to-5 work days. As deadlines loom closer, coding teams often enter a phase of “crunch time” defined by all-nighters. Even when working for yourself, you’ll have to pour in many daily hours if you want to stay ahead of your competition.

In addition, programming problems tend to get stuck in your brain and follow you around everywhere you go. You’ll be working through solutions while in the shower, while commuting, and even while lying in bed. Because so much of programming happens in your head, compartmentalization can be difficult if not impossible.

If you’re lucky you may be able to find a company that doesn’t do crunch time, but I wouldn’t count on it.

Sign #6: You Expect To Get Rich Quick

There was a time when software development was a lucrative pursuit. Nowadays, programmers who get rich quick are the exception to the rule. If your primary motivation for being in this industry is to make a lot of money in the shortest amount of time, you’re in for some disappointment.

Overnight success stories, such as the popularity of Flappy Bird, can lure us into false expectations and delusional confidence. A lot of people have tried their hand at indie game development in the hopes of striking similar levels of success only to flop and leave the industry altogether.

Can you make a lot of money as a programmer? Sure, but it won’t be an easy road. If you’re looking to get rich quick, you might as well play the lottery instead.
Final Thoughts

Let’s say you’ve decided that programming isn’t for you but you still want to make use of the programming-related skills and knowledge that you’ve built up over the years. What are your options?

Writing. The technical experience from programming can make you well-suited for technical writing (manuals, documentation, etc.), journalism (staying up to date with bleeding edge news), or education (teaching others what you know).

Analysis. Depending on your field of expertise, you could put your knowledge to use as a consultant for security systems, web platforms, game engines, monetization models, etc. Quality assurance testing is another field where analytical expertise can come in handy.

Management. If you have a heart for business but want to remain connected to the software industry, why not manage your own team of developers? Managers who understand the nuances of coding are few and far between.

That’s just scratching the surface. Just know that even if you realize that you don’t want to be a programmer anymore, those skills are transferable and your time was not wasted.

1 Like

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by proxy20: 6:08pm On Jul 17, 2015
When you can write 5 line of code correctly o;
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Vstuffs(m): 6:31pm On Jul 17, 2015
Save 2 read later
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by fattbabakay(m): 11:15pm On Jul 17, 2015
frontpage calls
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Djtm(m): 11:38pm On Jul 17, 2015
Did you write the article?
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by ghettodreamz(m): 2:30am On Jul 18, 2015
Good one @ OP, but next time try to cite the original link to give credit to whom it is due. cheesy

2 Likes

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Netanda(m): 10:55am On Jul 18, 2015
Djtm:
Did you write the article?
I think he scraped it somewhere, coz I sighted something that looks like "Ads by Google" in the article.
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Netanda(m): 10:57am On Jul 18, 2015
Netanda:

I think he scraped it somewhere, coz I sighted something that looks like "Ads by Google" in the article.

#NoOffence

Just my observation
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by thewebcraft(m): 2:08pm On Jul 18, 2015
Djtm:
Did you write the article?
No got it from a friends blog.....
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by basille(m): 8:57pm On Jul 18, 2015
I qualify for all, Yipee!!! i'm meant to be a programmer.
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by guente02(m): 12:56pm On Jul 19, 2015
I know that I'm destined to be a programmer.
Was going to church today and thinking how to centre a webpage when zoomed out in html and css (just starting out on web development).
Still haven't figured it out though but I'll surmount that because its a matter of time.

2 Likes

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by codemarshal08(m): 1:04pm On Jul 19, 2015
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Stconvict(m): 2:26pm On Aug 22, 2015
basille:
I qualify for all, Yipee!!! i'm meant to be a programmer.
Do you qualify for the last one too?
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by basille(m): 8:41pm On Aug 22, 2015
Stconvict:

Do you qualify for the last one too?
YES!
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Akoja360(m): 1:20am On Aug 24, 2015
#Not being goood at maths...
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Stconvict(m): 3:11pm On Aug 24, 2015
Akoja360:
#Not being goood at maths...
Depending on what aspect of the software industry you are interested in and the logic of your application, you may actually not need more than secondary school maths.
But it's best to understand some areas in maths, they always come in handy when troubleshooting tricky problems.
For me, as a graphics programmer, I had to learn algebra, trig, set, calculus, matrices, linear algebra, complex number and quats. Ultimately, you don't learn them just because you need them, but in order to understand their relationships with the practical world and make useful deductions from that.

1 Like

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by FincoApps(m): 5:41pm On Aug 24, 2015
Exactly. I don't like maths too.
Stconvict:

Depending on what aspect of the software industry you are interested in and the logic of your application, you may actually not need more than secondary school maths.
But it's best to understand some areas in maths, they always come in handy when troubleshooting tricky problems.
For me, as a graphics programmer, I had to learn algebra, trig, set, calculus, matrices, linear algebra, complex number and quats. Ultimately, you don't learn them just because you need them, but in order to understand their relationships with the practical world and make useful deductions from that.
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by uvalued(m): 3:47am On Aug 25, 2015
thewebcraft:
Not everyone is cut out to be a programmer. Sure, anyone can learn how to program, but learning how to program is not the same as making a career out of it. In fact, it’s entirely possible to be a talented coder and still be a mismatch for the career. It sounds strange, I know, but it’s truer than you might think.

There’s more to it than the act of coding. You have to consider the entire picture. If you aren’t completely sure that you’re meant to be a programmer, here are some signs that may point you in the right direction.

Sign #1: You Lack Experimental Creativity

Despite being heavy on the logic, programming is ultimately a creative art. A new program is like a blank canvas and your paintbrushes are your languages, frameworks, libraries, etc. You’re creating something out of nothing and this is a process that hinges on experimental fearlessness.

Dogmatic coders will tell you that there’s “one true way” to write good code, but that’s not true at all. Such a statement is as nonsensical as saying there’s only one way to build a house, write a novel, or cook a stew. There are many ways to code software and you should be willing to experiment.

Without natural curiosity, you’ll develop tunnel vision and always approach your coding problems from the same angle. At that point, programming becomes rote work and loses much of what makes it rewarding in the first place.

Sign #2: You Are Not Self-Driven

All good programmers need to be self-driven and there’s no way around this. When you strip away all of the extraneous details, programming is fundamentally repetitive. If you have no personal stake or ambition in the code you write, then you’re just going to be miserable.

This is true of any creative endeavor (and no matter what anyone says, programming is creative). Your motivation to write code has to come from within. You have to love the act of coding just as much as the potential for walking away with a final product. If you don’t love the process, you’ll never reach the product.
If you wake up in the morning and you don’t feel a burning desire to work on your project, perhaps programming is not the right outlet for you.

Sign #3: You Hate Logic Problems

Despite being a creative endeavor, programming is more about fixing than it is creating. While other creative outlets do involve a fixing process (such as writers who need to revise their drafts), programming is unique in that most of the problems that pop up are based on logic-based faults.

This fixing process, known properly as debugging, is the heart of programming. Are you fascinated by riddles and logic puzzles? Do you have an innate desire to repair that which is broken? And by extension, are you naturally inquisitive about the inner workings of things? You should be able to answer “Yes” to all of the above.

Much of the reward in programming comes from fixing bugs. The more complicated the bug, the more rewarding it is when you finally solve it. If you find no satisfaction in this, then programming will be nothing more than an endless string of frustrations.

Sign #4: You Can’t Sit For Long Periods

The nature of programming requires that you sit in front of a computer for extended lengths of time. You may be able to work around it by building a standing desk but the essence is the same: you’re going to spend a lot of time in front of your computer.

There are some concerns when it comes to this kind of computer-related sedentary lifestyle and it can lead to serious health issues if you ignore it for too long. Along similar lines, you may have to wrestle with mental issues like unwanted distractions, cabin fever, and lapses in productivity.

Ultimately, the question is: are you comfortable being in front of a computer for most of your day? In fact, comfortable may not be enough; you have to prefer being in front of a computer. If not, productivity and happiness are going to be uphill battles.

Sign #5: You Want Normal Work Hours

Programming careers fall into one of two types: 1) you work for someone else or 2) you work for yourself. Either way, it’s not uncommon to hear stories of late nights, long coding sessions, and an overall low quality of life.

Software development is a deadline-centric industry and deadlines don’t play nicely with traditional 9-to-5 work days. As deadlines loom closer, coding teams often enter a phase of “crunch time” defined by all-nighters. Even when working for yourself, you’ll have to pour in many daily hours if you want to stay ahead of your competition.

In addition, programming problems tend to get stuck in your brain and follow you around everywhere you go. You’ll be working through solutions while in the shower, while commuting, and even while lying in bed. Because so much of programming happens in your head, compartmentalization can be difficult if not impossible.

If you’re lucky you may be able to find a company that doesn’t do crunch time, but I wouldn’t count on it.

Sign #6: You Expect To Get Rich Quick

There was a time when software development was a lucrative pursuit. Nowadays, programmers who get rich quick are the exception to the rule. If your primary motivation for being in this industry is to make a lot of money in the shortest amount of time, you’re in for some disappointment.

Overnight success stories, such as the popularity of Flappy Bird, can lure us into false expectations and delusional confidence. A lot of people have tried their hand at indie game development in the hopes of striking similar levels of success only to flop and


thanks will check and gauge my skills
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by yinkeys(m): 3:58pm On Aug 27, 2015
thewebcraft:
Not everyone is cut out to be a programmer. Sure, anyone can learn how to program, but learning how to program is not the same as making a career out of it. In fact, it’s entirely possible to be a talented coder and still be a mismatch for the career. It sounds strange, I know, but it’s truer than you might think.

There’s more to it than the act of coding. You have to consider the entire picture. If you aren’t completely sure that you’re meant to be a programmer, here are some signs that may point you in the right direction.

Sign #1: You Lack Experimental Creativity

Despite being heavy on the logic, programming is ultimately a creative art. A new program is like a blank canvas and your paintbrushes are your languages, frameworks, libraries, etc. You’re creating something out of nothing and this is a process that hinges on experimental fearlessness.

Dogmatic coders will tell you that there’s “one true way” to write good code, but that’s not true at all. Such a statement is as nonsensical as saying there’s only one way to build a house, write a novel, or cook a stew. There are many ways to code software and you should be willing to experiment.

Without natural curiosity, you’ll develop tunnel vision and always approach your coding problems from the same angle. At that point, programming becomes rote work and loses much of what makes it rewarding in the first place.

Sign #2: You Are Not Self-Driven

All good programmers need to be self-driven and there’s no way around this. When you strip away all of the extraneous details, programming is fundamentally repetitive. If you have no personal stake or ambition in the code you write, then you’re just going to be miserable.

This is true of any creative endeavor (and no matter what anyone says, programming is creative). Your motivation to write code has to come from within. You have to love the act of coding just as much as the potential for walking away with a final product. If you don’t love the process, you’ll never reach the product.
If you wake up in the morning and you don’t feel a burning desire to work on your project, perhaps programming is not the right outlet for you.

Sign #3: You Hate Logic Problems

Despite being a creative endeavor, programming is more about fixing than it is creating. While other creative outlets do involve a fixing process (such as writers who need to revise their drafts), programming is unique in that most of the problems that pop up are based on logic-based faults.

This fixing process, known properly as debugging, is the heart of programming. Are you fascinated by riddles and logic puzzles? Do you have an innate desire to repair that which is broken? And by extension, are you naturally inquisitive about the inner workings of things? You should be able to answer “Yes” to all of the above.

Much of the reward in programming comes from fixing bugs. The more complicated the bug, the more rewarding it is when you finally solve it. If you find no satisfaction in this, then programming will be nothing more than an endless string of frustrations.

Sign #4: You Can’t Sit For Long Periods

The nature of programming requires that you sit in front of a computer for extended lengths of time. You may be able to work around it by building a standing desk but the essence is the same: you’re going to spend a lot of time in front of your computer.

There are some concerns when it comes to this kind of computer-related sedentary lifestyle and it can lead to serious health issues if you ignore it for too long. Along similar lines, you may have to wrestle with mental issues like unwanted distractions, cabin fever, and lapses in productivity.

Ultimately, the question is: are you comfortable being in front of a computer for most of your day? In fact, comfortable may not be enough; you have to prefer being in front of a computer. If not, productivity and happiness are going to be uphill battles.

Sign #5: You Want Normal Work Hours

Programming careers fall into one of two types: 1) you work for someone else or 2) you work for yourself. Either way, it’s not uncommon to hear stories of late nights, long coding sessions, and an overall low quality of life.

Software development is a deadline-centric industry and deadlines don’t play nicely with traditional 9-to-5 work days. As deadlines loom closer, coding teams often enter a phase of “crunch time” defined by all-nighters. Even when working for yourself, you’ll have to pour in many daily hours if you want to stay ahead of your competition.

In addition, programming problems tend to get stuck in your brain and follow you around everywhere you go. You’ll be working through solutions while in the shower, while commuting, and even while lying in bed. Because so much of programming happens in your head, compartmentalization can be difficult if not impossible.

If you’re lucky you may be able to find a company that doesn’t do crunch time, but I wouldn’t count on it.

Sign #6: You Expect To Get Rich Quick

There was a time when software development was a lucrative pursuit. Nowadays, programmers who get rich quick are the exception to the rule. If your primary motivation for being in this industry is to make a lot of money in the shortest amount of time, you’re in for some disappointment.

Overnight success stories, such as the popularity of Flappy Bird, can lure us into false expectations and delusional confidence. A lot of people have tried their hand at indie game development in the hopes of striking similar levels of success only to flop and

Sign #7: You do not like mathematics, you avoid anything that has to do with advanced mathematics
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by FincoApps(m): 6:12pm On Aug 27, 2015
Wrong. Maths or advanced Maths is important if you want to specialize where it's needed. Alot of programs don't require maths
yinkeys:

Sign #7: You do not like mathematics, you avoid anything that has to do with advanced mathematics

1 Like

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Stconvict(m): 10:45pm On Aug 27, 2015
FincoApps:
Wrong. Maths or advanced Maths is important if you want to specialize where it's needed. Alot of programs don't require maths
That's what he meant. You interpreted wrongly.
Sign #7 (that you are not meant to be a programmer): You do not like mathematics, you avoid anything that has to do with advanced mathematics
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by udoh2k: 5:15pm On Aug 28, 2015
1. Yes, there is always a "inner drive" for programming. If you don't have it, don't waste your time trying to be a programmer.
Don't go into programming because ur friends do or because you study computer science. Yet studying computer science in school can give you the drive.

2. Programmers can sit for hours writing codes for fun, not for money. If all you need programming for, is money. forget it.

3. Programmers think of solving problems, and often take the problem along even when sleeping. If you don't want to THINK, or be thinking even as you work, walk, play, sleep; then forget programming.

Programming is brain-sapping. It can also be very very rewarding. Above all, it is fun!

2 Likes

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by MadNuke(m): 10:36pm On Aug 28, 2015
Sign #8: You like girls more than you like your laptop.
So if the girl says "It's me or the laptop". You must go with the laptop.

3 Likes

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Djtm(m): 3:04am On Aug 29, 2015
MadNuke:
Sign #8: You like girls more than you like your laptop.
So if the girl says "It's me or the laptop". You must go with the laptop.
This is so on point.
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by FincoApps(m): 7:52am On Aug 29, 2015
That has affected me a lot. I'm always glued to my laptop. He even has a name grin
MadNuke:
Sign #8: You like girls more than you like your laptop.
So if the girl says "It's me or the laptop". You must go with the laptop.
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by Ilekeh: 7:10pm On Aug 30, 2015
I love what I do.

I have found myself spending long hours coding and the hours just breeze by.

One day I found myself in the office at 4am.

It's just fun and exciting when you find a quicker solution.

What I hate about coding is trying to locate a problem in your pages and pages of code. It's like a maze.
Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by thewebcraft(m): 10:16am On Aug 31, 2015
FincoApps:
I'm always glued to my laptop. He even has a name grin
Mine is a SHE grin grin grin

2 Likes

Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by FincoApps(m): 1:45pm On Aug 31, 2015
hahahaha,
thewebcraft:

Mine is a SHE grin grin grin

1 Like

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