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Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 12:11am On Sep 16, 2013
English is not all about speaking it, but getting everything about it right.

Below are some of the most
common and most annoying
mistakes people make on a daily basis when using English to communicate.


“Popular Celebrity”

One has to wonder what makes one a celebrity in the first place. Can a person be said to be a celebrity
without being at least remotely famous? Using this description is similar to using other tautological phrases such as “a young child” (who
is a child?) and “the cheapest
price” (what is a price?).


“I’m vs Am”

The frequency at which this is used will make one believe that it is actually correct. It is presently the most common grammatical error in the English language; being used by people everywhere and every time.

“Am” cannot be used in place of “I’m because they are not the same. What people write as “am” is actually “I’m” which is a contraction for “I
am”. The confusion here arises, because they sound alike. Well, they don’t really sound alike if you listen carefully. Now, let’s try this
pronunciation exercise. “Am” is pronounced “arrrgh-m”, while “I’m” is pronounced “arrrgh-im”.

Understood? I hope so. “Am” is solely dependent on “I” and cannot stand on its own. It either comes before or after the pronoun “I”. So, the next
time you send a message to
someone on Facebook or compose a tweet, don’t embarrass yourself, use
“I’m” instead of “am”.

Credits:
http://observerreports.com/2013/09/most-annoying-common-grammatical-errors-in-english/

20 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 12:19am On Sep 16, 2013
“Infidel”

This word is usually (mis)applied when one is referring to an unfaithful partner in a romantic relationship. In fact, an infidel
actually means an unbeliever; someone who doubts the central tenets of a particular religion, especially Christianity. It has nothing
to do with “infidelity.”


“First Come, First Serve”

Have you ever been to an
establishment and you were told that “customers are only attended to on a first come, first serve basis”?

Have you innocently used those words before? I guess you have, and I also believe that you didn’t know it’s wrong. Next time, what you
should say is “first come, first served“.

“Is Because/the reason why”

Using it makes one sound brainless and look stupid, but that has not prevented people from saying this anytime the need for it arises. The words “is” and “because” serve the same purpose in certain situations and cannot be used together in those circumstances. Instead of
using “it is because", use “is that”.

The same goes for “the reason why”; instead of using “the reason why”, use “the reason is that.”


“Some Certain”

This is similar to the “reason why” scenario I pointed out above. “Some” and “certain” basically mean the same thing and when you say “some certain”, you are actually saying “some some” or “certain certain.”

Credits:
http://observerreports.com/2013/09/most-annoying-common-grammatical-errors-in-english/

3 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 12:27am On Sep 16, 2013
“12 noon, 12 midnight, 12 am, 12 pm”

If you say “12 am” are you referring to 12 in the night or 12 in the afternoon? Well, strictly speaking, the day ends at 11:59 pm and begins
at midnight so you could be forgiven for referring to midnight as 12 am and noon as 12 pm.

But to avoid ambiguity, it's preferable to dodge any of these entirely. Similarly, saying “12 noon” or “12 midnight” is tautological, because everyone knows that when the clock strikes 12, it’s either midnight or midday (noon).

Other time-related and date-
related errors that are in constant use are:

3:30 (when spoken, it is “half-past 3″, not “three-thirty”)

7:15, 10:45 (when spoken, it should be “quarter past 7″ and “quarter to 11″)

December 25th, January 1st, July 4th (when a date follows the name of a month, it doesn’t come with the rankings “eth”, “first”, “second”, “third” etc; December 25, January 1, July 4 are correct)


“My names are”

It hurts my ears to hear someone say that. When it comes to annoyance, this one carries the day. When we use words just because others have used it and sounded right, this is the result. The correct thing to say remains (and has always been) “my
name is…”

Let’s take a look at a practical example. If Mr. Peter Stevens Smith should introduce himself to someone at the mall and starts with “my name is”, what he would say is, “Hello, my name is
Peter Stevens Smith.” But if he makes the mistake of starting with “my names are”, strictly speaking, he should say something like, “Hello, my names are Peter, Stevens and Smith.” The latter, you’ll agree with
me, sounds very stupid.

Credits:
http://observerreports.com/2013/09/most-annoying-common-grammatical-errors-in-english/

14 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 12:33am On Sep 16, 2013
“It’s vs its”

Use “its” when you are referring to something that belongs to or is part of an animal or an inanimate object. “It’s” actually means “it is” or “it has”. So, when next you want to write something like this, “It’s
handle needs to be repaired,” think again.


“Who vs whom”

“I came into the office and was met by the polite secretary who I told you about .” Right? Wrong! The
correct statement should be, “I came into the office and was met by the polite secretary whom I told you
about.” “Whom” should be used when you are referring to the object (or as teachers would say, the receiver of an action) in a sentence.
The rule of the thumb is that if you are referring to someone other than the first person you mentioned in a
sentence – or yourself – you should use “whom”.


Double Negatives

Trying to be hippie and gangsta can land you in trouble, not only with the law, but with almighty English. How many times have you said something like this, “You ain’t gonna see nobody down there”? If you ever said it, you’ve violated one of the cardinal rules of the English language. This statement has two negative words, “ain’t” and “nobody”, occurring in the same sentence. Two or more negative words do not go together in a sentence.

Credits: http://observerreports.com/2013/09/most-annoying-common-grammatical-errors-in-english/

8 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 12:43am On Sep 16, 2013
Well, that's it. You can add yours or ask questions if you need clarifications.
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Ladybianca(f): 12:55am On Sep 16, 2013
wow, nice piece. i love this....it is indeed an eye opener....(i hope i'm not wrong?)

2 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by chiketee(m): 1:46am On Sep 16, 2013
Ok. Nice, but I disagree with some of the points. A celebrity maybe well known but not popular. Being popular has to do with approval and favour by the general public. That's why you have words like 'infamous' for celebrities who lack approval by the public. Hitler was a celebrity but he wasn't popular around the world. My point is popular doesn't mean well known, although for something to be popular it has to be well known. Therefore you can use the phrase popular celebrity for a well known person who has the approval and favour of the people. Not all celebs are popular . The one about three thirty , I also don't get how it's a grammatical error. It's just an alternative way of saying half past three. It's just like someone saying six thirty one in place of six hundred and thirty one.

20 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 8:33am On Sep 16, 2013
Ladybianca: wow, nice piece. i love this....it is indeed an eye opener....(i hope i'm not wrong?)
You are right.
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 9:14am On Sep 16, 2013
chiketee: Ok. Nice, but I disagree with some of the points. A celebrity maybe well known but not popular. Being popular has to do with approval and favour by the general public. That's why you have words like 'infamous' for celebrities who lack approval by the public. Hitler was a celebrity but he wasn't popular around the world. My point is popular doesn't mean well known, although for something to be popular it has to be well known. Therefore you can use the phrase popular celebrity for a well known person who has the approval and favour of the people. Not all celebs are popular . The one about three thirty , I also don't get how it's a grammatical error. It's just an alternative way of saying half past three. It's just like someone saying six thirty one in place of six hundred and thirty one.
Yes, you are right, but this is not usually the case. Often, when people say popular celebrity they are not referring to the celebrity's level of acceptance by the public rather they are trying to emphasize how well-known they are. For example, I've heard people refer to Nicki Minaj and Justin Beiber as popular celebrities and if you know who they are you'll agree with me that they are not among the most loved celebrities in America.

Coming to the second point you raised, certain things we say on a day-to-day basis in English language are not acceptable in formal settings like in interviews, speeches or examinations. In such situations there are protocols that must be observed. Three-thirty is not a grammatical error per se, but there are laid down rules in English language which must be followed. And one of such rules and formalities is that whenever the clock is at 3:30 or 7:30 etc you should say something like half-past 3 or half-past 7. The same goes for 3:45 etc, we all know that it is three-forty-five, but formality demands that you say quarter to 4. I don't know if this is clear enough.

7 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by chiketee(m): 10:01am On Sep 16, 2013
JMOI: Yes, you are right, but this is not usually the case. Often, when people say popular celebrity they are not referring to the celebrity's level of acceptance by the public rather they are trying to emphasize how well-known they are. For example, I've heard people refer to Nicki Minaj and Justin Beiber as popular celebrities and if you know who they are you'll agree with me that they are not among the most loved celebrities in America.

Coming to the second point you raised, certain things we say on a day-to-day basis in English language are not acceptable in formal settings like in interviews, speeches or examinations. In such situations there are protocols that must be observed. Three-thirty is not a grammatical error per se, but there are laid down rules in English language which must be followed. And one of such rules and formalities is that whenever the clock is at 3:30 or 7:30 etc you should say something like half-past 3 or half-past 7. The same goes for 3:45 etc, we all know that it is three-forty-five, but formality demands that you say quarter to 4. I don't know if this is clear enough.
Yeah it makes sense. No more three thirty in formal occasions . I would never even say popular celebrity , sounds weird shaa

1 Like

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by JMOI: 11:38am On Sep 16, 2013
That's exactly what I'm saying. More suggestions and questions pls...

1 Like

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by lifestyle1(m): 3:28pm On Sep 16, 2013
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Etumgbe(m): 3:33pm On Sep 16, 2013
GS 101

2 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Vonwolf(m): 3:33pm On Sep 16, 2013
You can't eat your cake and have it vs you can't have your cake and eat it...

1 Like

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Willgates(m): 3:34pm On Sep 16, 2013
"infidel " who uses that in place of "infidelity?"



#MKPO ABA O

2 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Nobody: 3:35pm On Sep 16, 2013
[size=14pt]I encode, you decode... I don't have time for these brouhaha[/size]

1 Like

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Nobody: 3:36pm On Sep 16, 2013
Willgates: wait let me read d post first... am coming back to comment

am

1 Like

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Willgates(m): 3:37pm On Sep 16, 2013
JMOI: English is not all about speaking it, but getting everything about it right.

Below are some of the most
common and most annoying
mistakes people make on a daily basis when using English to communicate.


“Popular Celebrity”

One has to wonder what makes one a celebrity in the first place. Can a person be said to be a celebrity
without being at least remotely famous? Using this description is similar to using other tautological phrases such as “a young child” (who
is a child?) and “the cheapest
price” (what is a price?).


“I’m vs Am”

The frequency at which this is used will make one believe that it is actually correct. It is presently the most common grammatical error in the English language; being used by people everywhere and every time.

“Am” cannot be used in place of “I’m because they are not the same. What people write as “am” is actually “I’m” which is a contraction for “I
am”. The confusion here arises, because they sound alike. Well, they don’t really sound alike if you listen carefully. Now, let’s try this
pronunciation exercise. “Am” is pronounced “arrrgh-m”, while “I’m” is pronounced “arrrgh-im”.

Understood? I hope so. “Am” is solely dependent on “I” and cannot stand on its own. It either comes before or after the pronoun “I”. So, the next
time you send a message to
someone on Facebook or compose a tweet, don’t embarrass yourself, use
“I’m” instead of “am”.

Credits:
http://observerreports.com/2013/09/most-annoying-common-grammatical-errors-in-english/


so when can I use "am"
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Nyaku(m): 3:40pm On Sep 16, 2013
#Word! Facts man, facts....

1 Like

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by edrys(m): 3:40pm On Sep 16, 2013
Okay
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by igahdavid(m): 3:40pm On Sep 16, 2013
JMOI:

Other time-related and date-
related errors that are in constant use are:

3:30 (when spoken, it is “half-past 3″, not “three-thirty”)

7:15, 10:45 (when spoken, it should be “quarter past 7″ and “quarter to 11″)

/

Nice write up, but I don't agree that, 3:30 when spoken as "three-thirty", 7:15 as "seven-fifteen"
or 10:45 as "ten-forty five" is wrong.

Its a less formal way of saying the time but its not wrong

2 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by moscobabs(m): 3:40pm On Sep 16, 2013
so why clamoring for ASUU resumption? There are lecturers on Nairaland already ...pls I need my certificate here ooo!!!!

5 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by kunlesehan(m): 3:41pm On Sep 16, 2013
thank God 4 pidgin english o
we give up! ( yuzedo's voice )
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by dayleke: 3:41pm On Sep 16, 2013
With the time "thingy" <-----(hope I'm right),should have written "things",
You can also say a quarter off 4 for 3:45,right? and a quarter after 4 for 4:15,right?
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Kslib(m): 3:42pm On Sep 16, 2013
Hmmn...
..
All izz well!
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by BigBelleControl(m): 3:46pm On Sep 16, 2013
Nice one @op.
I want to know if this expression is correct. 'You cannot not do it'.
Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by ifeegee(f): 3:46pm On Sep 16, 2013
Nice article.
English language is dynamic and always subject to change.

1 Like

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by bayusman: 3:46pm On Sep 16, 2013
how do we pronounce 3:26 in a formal occassion.

2 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Iceman296: 3:48pm On Sep 16, 2013
Willgates: wait let me read d post first... am coming back to comment
"Am"? Obviously, You Haven't Read it.

2 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by sugardaddy1(m): 3:49pm On Sep 16, 2013
Nice post.

Many thanks for shedding light on the "My names are..." introduction.I have seen so many people use it unchallenged in the past that I was almost tempted to fall for it. Now I know better not to.

5 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by samtos007: 3:50pm On Sep 16, 2013
"I'm going to my working place" nahhh, rather say "I'm going to my place of work". Can a place work?

4 Likes

Re: Most Annoying Common Grammatical Errors In English by Nobody: 3:51pm On Sep 16, 2013
JMOI: Well, that's it. You can add yours or ask questions if you need clarifications.
Question please!

1.Should question mark (?) be used at the end of a sentence that starts 'hope' e.g. Hope u ain't going there(?).
2. What aя̩̥̊ε̲̣̣̣̥ the differences amongst 'made of', 'made with' and 'made from'?

1 Like

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