Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / LOGIN! / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 2,511,411 members, 5,725,731 topics. Date: Tuesday, 14 July 2020 at 07:32 AM

Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant - Travel (8) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Travel / Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant (355310 Views)

Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 / Living In The Uk/life As A UK Immigrant / Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant (2) (3) (4)

(1) (2) (3) ... (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) ... (105) (Reply) (Go Down)

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Primescope: 12:43pm On Oct 18, 2017
OK, bro. It was a mistake.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by nosula: 4:18pm On Oct 18, 2017
Based on my analysis on Job sites (SEEK AND Indeed), I noticed that there are more job opportunities for me in Melbourne and Sydney (Although I was told majority of the jobs are not even advertised). I would still go to Perth initially just to see friends but I finally relocate to either Sydney or Melbourne or wherever a job offer takes me to. grin

majiouk2002:


Bro, was there any reason why you ditched Perth for Melbourne and Sydney? Thanks
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Phlunter01: 5:28pm On Oct 18, 2017
Hello Fam,

So, while trying to do some research on the different states in Aussie and the best places to settle down and all (trying to while away time and not get anxious while waiting on GOD to manifest our direct grants via DIBP), I saw an article with the extract below;

JOBSEEKERS chasing the big bucks should head to regional Western Australia or our nation’s capital.
The Kalgoorlie, Goldfields and Esperance region recorded the highest average salary advertised in SEEK job ads last financial year, at $99,236.
It topped the list of major cities and regions in SEEK’s City Spotlight research, followed by Port Hedland, Karratha and Pilbara ($98,027) and Canberra ($85,819).
Sydney ($84,525) and Melbourne ($81,842) rounded out the top five paying locations.
While job ads in capital cities generally threw around the most cash, some regional counterparts gave them a run for their money.


Oya una wey sabi lets gist about it, what's your take.

P.S: In this sojourn of mine I have found family and friends that are willing to help us settle in the following areas;

Melbourne (West & South East)
Sydney
Brisbane
Perth

So how una see am oh *in wazobia FM tone*

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Collins4u1(m): 5:29pm On Oct 18, 2017
@mctowel01
what kinda visa did you arrived aussie with?
student or what, abeg ansa me o pls.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by mctowel01: 4:25am On Oct 19, 2017
Collins4u1:
@mctowel01
what kinda visa did you arrived aussie with?
student or what, abeg ansa me o pls.
PR visa
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by zanyzara: 8:20am On Oct 19, 2017
chidike:


Hello all, its been a while since I came here, congrats to everyone who have been successful, and to those yet to succeed, dont stop oh.

Just to update you guys on my situation, which I must say is a bit unique. Though I have Australian PR now, I am currently living and working in New Zealand. I left Naija last week, on the 11th, but about 2 months before leaving I started applying for jobs,I received lots of regret mails, but in the midst of those I got interviewed as well bybsome other firms and had video interviews with 3 accounting firms (I work as an auditor) and these interviews I believe would have landed me an offer if not that I got another offer and emailed the firms about my decision not to continue.

Like I once mentioned on this thread, your Australian PR gives you the right to work and live in both Australia and New Zealand. I was able to leverage on the resources within my firm to secure a job with the same accounting firm in New Zealand, I received my offer before resigning, na God do am. My flight was via Dubai, I spent about 24 hours there and emirates lodged me in a hotel and this gave me the opportunity to go see the city, it was great experience. I also had to do a stopover in Australia to activate my PR, I arrived Australia on the 13th, the jet lag was not too bad for me sha. On the 14th I went to register for Medicare, open a bank account and also got a tax number, I received a temporary medicare printout while I was told the main one would be sent in two weeks. With that done, I chilled in Oz for a day and early on the 16th I flew to Melbourne from there to New Zealand.

My job is in the capital, Wellington, though it isnt the biggest city, Auckland is the commercial capital of the country. Upon arrival in New Zealand, I had no issues with immigration, my passport was stamped and I proceeded to my accomodation. Between the 18th and today, I have gone to open a bank account and apply for my tax number. They dont have medicare like OZ although the government subsidises costs for you. So far things have been okay, not many Africans in the city , I see one or two everyday though. Wellington is a nice small city, weather is about the same as Australia which was cold for me by the way, the temprature is about 9-11 degrees and winter is already over oh but its still cold. If I had know I would have brought more clothes to protect from the cold, mufflers included.

Based on my time in both countries I think Wellington is a bit more expensive in terms of a decent accomodation than Australia and as you know rent is the biggest cost to be incurred.

I'll end this long post by advising accountants, start looking for jobs a month before you leave, its accounting, IFRS is the same everywhere, if you have ACCA, you can easily convert in both countries. One thing I did while Looking for a job was to include my visa status in my CV, so under the heading I had this "Visa Status- Australian Permanent Resident" that way they know thay you have work rights. Although one recruiter called me and asked me when I would be in Australia and I told him I had a job in Naija and was hoping to get an offer before moving, he said I may not get but to call him when I arrive. So you might be lucky and an offer will come while you're still in Naija and it will just make things easier.

But all I'm saying is, dont limit yourself to Australia alone, Goodluck! Please pardon my typos and grammar its 11:43pm.

15 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Nobody: 10:53am On Oct 19, 2017
Ok
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Nobody: 11:18am On Oct 19, 2017
Good morning all,

Please oo I need to ask as a family of 5 (3children) can we rent a two bedroom apartment for a start or it must be 3 because of family size? Do agents/landlord have a say on what to rent.

Also can we come with medicine especially for kids if yes,what type of drugs,then a list of Dos and don'ts of what to come along like food stuff, drugs, needle and crochet pins grin cheesy etc.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by mevisbleek: 12:55pm On Oct 19, 2017
einsteino:


you were fined for not voting? hehe well since unlike naija, in Aussie, fishes and cows dont vote, and the votes of humans count, i cant really blame them for inposing a fine.

as for your second paragraph, that isnt cool, it is awesome! mehn i really do love what i read and see of aussie, but seems fate is pulling me to canny.

I've been living in canny for 9 yrs now (schooled and work here). For some reason fate is pulling me to Aussie. Lol. I'm tired of canny for now I need to work in a different country for a couple of years. I know aussie and canny will be similar. I see a lot of australians coming to canny with the working holiday visa, them full banff alberta working in resorts.

I am yet to find out if the salary in Aussie is higher than Canada. Well, let's see how it goes in 2018. I might be here soon asking for suggestions on areas to live.

7 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by salford1: 1:14pm On Oct 19, 2017
mevisbleek:


I've been living in canny for 9 yrs now (schooled and work here). For some reason fate is pulling me to Aussie. Lol. I'm tired of canny for now I need to work in a different country for a couple of years. I know aussie and canny will be similar. I see a lot of australians coming to canny with the working holiday visa, them full banff alberta working in resorts.

I am yet to find out if the salary in Aussie is higher than Canada. Well, let's see how it goes in 2018. I might be here soon asking for suggestions on areas to live.
They travel just to have fun and explore I think. when i was in the UK, there were lots of Canadians and Australians working in fast food restaurants with the working holiday visa. I also had a British colleague in my office who quit her job to go and work in farms in Australia for a year. I saw a picture she posted online of her and other working holiday visa holders picking fruits on a farm in Australia.

2 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by mevisbleek: 1:19pm On Oct 19, 2017
Phlunter01:
Hello Fam,

So, while trying to do some research on the different states in Aussie and the best places to settle down and all (trying to while away time and not get anxious while waiting on GOD to manifest our direct grants via DIBP), I saw an article with the extract below;

JOBSEEKERS chasing the big bucks should head to regional Western Australia or our nation’s capital.
The Kalgoorlie, Goldfields and Esperance region recorded the highest average salary advertised in SEEK job ads last financial year, at $99,236.
It topped the list of major cities and regions in SEEK’s City Spotlight research, followed by Port Hedland, Karratha and Pilbara ($98,027) and Canberra ($85,819).
Sydney ($84,525) and Melbourne ($81,842) rounded out the top five paying locations.
While job ads in capital cities generally threw around the most cash, some regional counterparts gave them a run for their money.


Oya una wey sabi lets gist about it, what's your take.

P.S: In this sojourn of mine I have found family and friends that are willing to help us settle in the following areas;

Melbourne (West & South East)
Sydney
Brisbane
Perth

So how una see am oh *in wazobia FM tone*


Plunter01,

Very interesting post. My salary expectation na 145k-165k, plus RRSP. Not sure what uiu guys call your retirement savings over there. Make I begin find job for karlgoorie region. Lol

5 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Nobody: 8:52am On Oct 20, 2017
Phlunter01:
Hello Fam,

So, while trying to do some research on the different states in Aussie and the best places to settle down and all (trying to while away time and not get anxious while waiting on GOD to manifest our direct grants via DIBP), I saw an article with the extract below;

JOBSEEKERS chasing the big bucks should head to regional Western Australia or our nation’s capital.
The Kalgoorlie, Goldfields and Esperance region recorded the highest average salary advertised in SEEK job ads last financial year, at $99,236.
It topped the list of major cities and regions in SEEK’s City Spotlight research, followed by Port Hedland, Karratha and Pilbara ($98,027) and Canberra ($85,819).
Sydney ($84,525) and Melbourne ($81,842) rounded out the top five paying locations.
While job ads in capital cities generally threw around the most cash, some regional counterparts gave them a run for their money.


Oya una wey sabi lets gist about it, what's your take.

P.S: In this sojourn of mine I have found family and friends that are willing to help us settle in the following areas;

Melbourne (West & South East)
Sydney
Brisbane
Perth

So how una see am oh *in wazobia FM tone*



I lived in Kalgoorlie for about 18 months. Did not like the place but loved the money grin

5 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ideamaster(m): 11:42am On Oct 20, 2017
babylove01:

Please can you give info on the bolded. Thanks

Also please those in Perth can you drop useful tips on how to search for good suburbs

This depends on if you want to live NOR or SOR. North or South of the river. I lived SOR and I would say any suburb in the City of Canning is okay.

For those who need to get a licence or convert their licence in WA, its easy but that depends on how you approach it. Download and study the drive safe handbook. This would help you to properly understand the rules.

If you have a Naija licence, do lots of practice even when you are driving alone. Look at your blind spots, check your mirrors etc.

The Practical driving assessment is divided into 5 sections. You can pass or fail each section depending on the number of 'x' you get. If I remember correctly, when you pass 3 out of 5 sections, you pass the test. However, there are things you do that would make you to automatically fail the test. Like over speeding or making mistakes that would require the intervention of the assessor.

New arrivals, get your smart rider card and download the transperth app. It would make life easy for you. There are a couple of African shops in Cannington around Westfield Carousel. And just like someone mentioned, most Africans love to go shopping for fresh fruits and vegetables at Market City in Canning Vale.

2 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Vinsmuft(m): 7:30pm On Oct 20, 2017
uchenna2017:
Good morning all,

Please oo I need to ask as a family of 5 (3children) can we rent a two bedroom apartment for a start or it must be 3 because of family size? Do agents/landlord have a say on what to rent.

Also can we come with medicine especially for kids if yes,what type of drugs,then a list of Dos and don'ts of what to come along like food stuff, drugs, needle and crochet pins grin cheesy etc.




In my experience, there's not much difference in terms of cost between a 2 bed and 3 bed. In fact I've even seen where 3 bed duplex (called townhouse) is cheaper than 3 bed bungalow. The agent does not have a say on this. I have a family of a wife and 4 children. Back then we saw a wonderful 2 bed property. However the landlord was sceptical about giving it to us because he felt that we might not stay for a long time since we may need more space in future. That was his only reason as he was looking for a very long term tenant. My wife and I didn't like the idea of being tied down in a long term contract with a landlord and so we continued our search.
I don't know about bringing in drugs. As for foodstuff, as long as its dry and in clearly labeled transparent nylon bags, you should be fine.

5 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 9:32pm On Oct 20, 2017
@Uchenna,

You can bring in medications. However, if they are not over the counter drugs, come along with the doctor's prescription.

You can stay in a two bedroom if that is what is convenient for you.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Aussline: 10:38pm On Oct 20, 2017
bellong:
@Uchenna,

You can bring in medications. However, if they are not over the counter drugs, come along with the doctor's prescription.

You can stay in a two bedroom if that is what is convenient for you.


Pls I need to ask this.what if I am a doctor or a pharmacist ,can I bring drugs other than OTCs without a prescription,children drugs most especially.I will be coming in on visa 489.I heard healthcare is very expensive for non PR holders,so I want to have some drugs with me just in case any of my children falls sick.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Nobody: 8:46am On Oct 21, 2017
Thank you Bellong and Vinsmuft for your response.

Another thing can I use private hospital immunisation card for the children or it must be primary health centre card. What's this OPV am thinking its immunisation card but not sure can someone explain please, we already have yellow fever card.

Can we come with anything liquid like red oil? apart from drugs can we carry something like aboniki grin or silver bird oil ointment because of cold(children)has any body with kids travelled with such .

I understand that you can bring in any food stuff as long as its dry how about other items that are not food stuff like safety pin, needle and thread those smaller house things. I need a lady to respond as packing load is our speciality cheesy

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by NGOZIGLORI(f): 10:02am On Oct 21, 2017
Good morning house...@ Uchenna pls I have tried to send pm to u several times. Pls send me an email to ngyomeili@gmail.com .thanks
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Nobody: 11:03am On Oct 21, 2017
Please ask your questions in the other forum if it's what I know will gladly answer.

Thank you


quote author=NGOZIGLORI post=61628918]Good morning house...@ Uchenna pls I have tried to send pm to u several times. Pls send me an email to ngyomeili@gmail.com .thanks[/quote]
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Itissettled3: 1:43pm On Oct 21, 2017
OPV is oral polio vaccine.

I don't know for Australia but I know generally, travelling with liquid is frowned at so what I do for red oil is put them in this small lucozade plastic containers and freeze them. I bring them out the day i am leaving and wrap them in newspapers and put in ziploc bag.

Silverbird and aboniki is allowed. I travel with mentholatum, Robb, aboniki, silverbird, ori e.t.c cos this children can perform magic.

Safety pin, needle and thread is allowed but please not in your hand luggage or hand bag. Pack it in the luggage you are checking in but these things are cheap over there sha. Concentrate on carrying those things you know you can't get easily.


uchenna2017:
Thank you Bellong and Vinsmuft for your response.

Another thing can I use private hospital immunisation card for the children or it must be primary health centre card. What's this OPV am thinking its immunisation card but not sure can someone explain please, we already have yellow fever card.

Can we come with anything liquid like red oil? apart from drugs can we carry something like aboniki grin or silver bird oil ointment because of cold(children)has any body with kids travelled with such .

I understand that you can bring in any food stuff as long as its dry how about other items that are not food stuff like safety pin, needle and thread those smaller house things. I need a lady to respond as packing load is our speciality cheesy

3 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by catchdwind4rmkd(m): 4:38pm On Oct 21, 2017
It's been a positive and challenging experience for me in Australia.

Most of my experiences are quite similar to what has been shared by others.
So, I would try to avoid repetitions by responding directly to the pointers.

Also, I thought it wise to share my experience since I initially migrated on a temporary visa
rather than the popular Permanent Residency.

Your departure experience from Nigerian Airport?

I departed from Lagos International airport.

And the experience wasn't a surprising one;
Too many irrelevant questions by the immigration officers at different screening points.
Only to ask for tips after wasting my time.

The main questions were:
What are you going to do in Australia?
Do you know anyone in Australia?
Where would you be living?
Do you have a job offer?
Bla bla bla...

Apparently, they don't know much about the visa I was travelling with.
One officer intervened as he said he's had few people recently travelling on same visa.
So, he had to explain to others.

Besides that, every other departure process was smooth!

Stopover experience? When you landed at the airport?

My flight was booked via IOM;
So, I travelled with Emirates Airline.

Stopover experiences were nice, smooth, easy interesting but very funny grin

I had 2 stops - Dubai and Singapore

Dubai had a free breakfast for me; was a short stop (<4hrs), so no 5-star accommodation undecided
But I had a very funny experience I can never forget...
I was picked up by a staff and taken through the immigration points down to my connecting flight booking desk...
Only for me to start looking for my passport and was so confident I didn't take it from the last screening point.
I pity for the staff sha... After almost 2hrs of moving around the airport and searching for a supposedly lost passport...
BINGO!!! It was in my laptop bag!!! The very first pocket!!! The same pocket I have opened more than 5 times...
The point is I was awake all through the journey watching movies... grin

What are the immigration rules to follow?

Not much if you have nothing to hide.
Just present your travel documents and answer any questions asked

How did you carry all that cash with you?

In my bag; was below the amount to be declared.
If you have more than the allowed amount, just declare it!


Can you open bank account while still in Naija?

Yes.

I opened a NAB Offshore Account.

You can only make deposits to the account but can't withdraw or make any payment until you physically verify your identity by presenting your passport in person at the nearest branch upon arriving in Oz.

I transferred funds from my UK account into it before arrival.

Upon arrival, I went straight to the bank to deposit all the cash I came with coz I wasn't ready to find out how money can disappear while you're sleeping in a shared flat. I find that the currency exchange rate at the airport was far too low; I'd say it's an intended exploitation. I had to do it anyway to get some AUD for my cab. Interestingly, at the bank, I was told the bank rate and advised to walk the streets and look for a better rate. I got a better deal indeed.

Which State/suburb did you settle in and why?

As a Chemical Engineer with an Oil and Gas background, I obviously planned my relocation with Perth, Western Australia as my destination of choice but only made a U-turn just over a month before departing.

Thanks to a friend who shared his findings with me, I was able to make a more informed choice about my arrival city.

At the time, I understood Western Australia was facing recession due to the slow down of mining and Oil and Gas activities in the state.
So, there was no need clouding my thoughts with the state's past industrial fame.

Most importantly, the economy of Western Australia is somewhat centred around Mining, Oil and Gas which makes it offer limited opportunities.
So, it was best to move to a state with economic diversity that offers range of opportunities.
And as always, NSW, VIC and QLD usually come in that order.

I chose VIC because it offers almost the same range of opportunities as NSW with the advantage of moderate to affordable cost of living depending on lifestyle and preferences.

Driving in Australia? How long can you use your Naija driving license before you get Aussie license?

As a temporary resident, I had no limit.

But as a Permanent Resident in VIC, you can drive with an Overseas licence for 6 months after which you should obtain a Victorian licence.

Since Nigeria is not one of the countries that the driving licence can be exchanged for Australian one,
I'd to pass a (Road Rules) Knowledge Test, and Hazard Perception test; and then have my overseas drivers licence verified (took about 3 weeks) before being allowed to take the Practical Driving Test. I was given the options of 3yrs or 10yrs licence; I obviously went for 10yrs with a slight cost increase. Like others, I had 2 driving coaching sections to help me learn the rules and discipline of driving in Oz and also used the instructor for the actual test, something worth paying for grin

Where you live and why you like it or don't like it? Tips on choosing the right neighborhood, mortgage plans, proximity to work etc.

I guess this was the big one for me...

Getting accommodation from offshore can be very difficult as already reiterated here.
All my efforts and search proved fruitless.
Thanks to someone on a sister thread, I contacted a church that managed to secure an accommodation for me with an agency they had long lasting relationship with. So, I didn't have to pay anything until I arrive.
Sadly, after reading reviews online and learning the details of the apartment, I had to contact the church to cancel the agreement.
I didn't feel too good about this as I felt it may have affected the relationship between the church and agent but I had to.

Following that, I continued my search but found nothing mainly due to my budget as another friend was able to secure a place on flatmate.com.au from offshore. My worst experience was on Gumtree.com.au where I sent several messages to ads but received no reply only to realise Gumtree doesn't actually deliver messages from IP addresses that don't match local IPs. So all my sleepless nights were all for nothing, big waste...

So arrived Oz without having any place to stay; I was asked at immigration and told them I'm a bit picky when it comes to accommodation so decided I inspect few in person before making any payments. Once cleared from Immigration in Oz, I got a SIM, searched for places and contacted 3 landlords of shared flats, one called immediately and gave me the address. I ended up living there for 6 months...

It wasn't what I expected and definitely not what I liked, but it was fit-for-purpose and best for the situation.
I expected a shared flat but turned out to be a shared room.
First, it's been a long journey for me and all I wanted was to rest my head as I was awake the most part of my journey watching movies and chatting with peeps (Free WiFi on board).

Second, it was affordable ($120pw) and in the heart of the CBD; just 2mins walk to the Melbourne Central (Train) station.
I couldn't trade those for anything, not even comfort, at the time.

So, I'd to share a room with another.

It helped me with my job search as even though I had no car at the time, I can boast of easy commuting with direct access to any suburb.
It also helped me settle in quickly as I met some very nice friends from different countries and got to learn different cultures in the flat, enjoyed the night-life, had a lot of sightseeing and walked to virtually anywhere or hop on a FREE tram to go around the CBD. It also helped me save for my numerous English tests, EA Assessment Fee, PR Visa Fee, Car cost and some JARs of happy-hour beer of course!

The apartment wasn't comfortable for me (though preferred to backpackers), but its affordability and proximity can be captivating as in my case, I lived there for 6 months even though I planned to stay for a couple of weeks to sort myself out while looking for a private room.

I moved to a Northern Suburb which was influenced mainly by proximity to my new workplace, and partly by the desire to get a ride.
Parking space is a huge disadvantage of living in the CBD. Most people move out of the CBD to get accommodations that have garage or offstreet parking.

I love the Northern suburb because it's comparatively serene or rather quiet and less busy, but most importantly most of the buildings are new and modern. So, the facilities in the house are also still quite new and thus easy for you to maintain. The snag is that as you go further away from the CBD you move into Roos zone with increased risk of accidents and collision involving Kangaroos sad angry

To be fair, coming from Nigeria, I can't be bothered about neighbourhood grin
However, you can narrow your search using drugs and burglary as these account for the most crime and offences.
Stay away from suburbs where there's a high chance that someone next door is high on ice...
I can't pick out any suburb as I found most information to be misleading about Reservoir and Footscray which may even be due to discrimination as the inhabitants are mostly migrants...

A very important one... Mortgage...

To start, Australia has a very good and easy to access mortgage system and the Victorian govt is doing a lot to help people achieve the BIG Australian dream... Own their homes!!! But it's also worth noting that the prices of houses are very high in metropolitan cities. So, it's worth dedicating the time and effort to research about the Mortgage System and reviewing your income before deciding to go in as these would define your repayment experience as well as the risk of suffering a mortgage stress.

The biggest challenge is to save up the initial deposit which is why the government offers $10,000 and stamp duty fee waiver to intending first home buyers to help them make up the initial deposit. But that still isn't helping as you require an initial deposit equivalent to 20% (or 10% + LMI) of the value of the property. So, depending on what area you're buying. 20% can be from $60,000+. The Victorian govt has thus come up with a new scheme called HomesVIC to be rolled out by Jan 2018. A shared equity scheme in which the govt gives you 25% of the cost of the house so that you'd only need 5% deposit. Too good to be true indeed!!! The govt would have 25% equity share in the house so that whenever you want to pay out the govt, you'd need to pay back 25% of whatever the house is worth at the time of settling. ADDED Also, in VIC, you don't pay Land Rate or Tax on your PPR. You only pay for investment properties.

That said, no matter how you look at it, taking a mortgage is the wise thing to do and is far better than renting... Money paid as rent is dead money they say... And in more than 50% of cases, someone paying rent is actually helping another pay off their mortgage as it's common for people to take a mortgage and rent out one or two rooms in the house.

The maths actually favour families...
And if you're currently renting a comfortable house in the CBD or in a suburb, then you most likely can afford to commit to a mortgage repayment plan by moving slightly further away from your current place of residence. A family currently living in a 2 or 3 bedrooms flat that goes for about $450+pw in suburbs doesn't need a brainer to know that they're better off taking a mortgage in a different or developing suburb as depending on the principal borrowed, deposit paid, interest rate and loan term or period, you may pay as little as $2000pm or slightly more which is almost same as what you pay as rent and should have no issue paying the slight extra for a house that would eventually be yours. Interestingly, most of us have even done this before in Nigeria i.e. buy lands and build on the outskirts of the city due to affordability.

Fair enough, Australia has lenders that can offer you up to 30yrs loan term to repay your loan in bit to suit your current income level, and allow for extra unlimited repayments of the principal if your income level changes for the good. The downside of a longer repayment time is that you'd pay so much interest and sometimes this can be well over 50% of what was borrowed. But choosing a shorter loan period can subject you to mortgage stress which can have severe consequences. You may also lose the better part of your life just working to pay off debt rather than spread your debt and have a bit of fun with your family.

Different people have different theories on this; it's not a "one solution solves all" here. It's about what suits the individual. Some can't trade their comfortable city lifestyle and suffer the emotional trauma of living in a less developed quiet suburb just because they want to own a home. Others can manage through. Some are enthusiastic to own properties and go into rentvesting or real estate investment, while others are just interested in getting a place of primary residence (PPR) and stop paying rent. Wherever you fall, would determine how you proceed in this. Do not let yourself be tempted into taking a mortgage earlier than you're ready to, or to be scared of taking a mortgage. Make the decision for yourself freely.

How easy was it to settle in, with your kids? How did you go about finding the right schools for them? What is their school system like for toddlers (age 5 and below)?

NA

Can a mother combine work and taking care of the kids?

YES!

At least my colleagues (Ozies) do it!

I also don't see this as much of an issue if you have a Permanent job offer and working for a good employer;
usually you're entitled to paid maternal leave (centrelink also pays you during this period), and few employers can give you a flexible work arrangement like working hours that suit you or working from home few days a week to suit your new status (nursing mother). The later would be a very lucky privilege to get these days!

What culture shock have you experienced?

Calling everyone mate!
Someone far older than me calling me mate!

Calling my boss by his first name; it wasn't much of a big deal doing same to my lecturers in UK but found it tough doing so to my boss, senior colleagues and recruiters.

Sexual Orientation: still finding it hard to understand how there are over 7 sexes. Met someone who's a Queer as her sexual orientation and even after explaining that to me for hours if not days, I still don't understand a thing she said. Same-sex thingy! Still in shock and fingers crossed the outcome of the actual vote goes against which is most unlikely... And the big one, the latest addition now being discussed on media, can't remember what they called it but it refers to people who are happy with having their partner have different affairs or relationship with people of other different orientation other than the one for which they're both committed to. Too much for one trip!

Tips on how to cloth and cope with the cold weather

It's not cold all year round.

So you have to know the seasons and dress for the season.

Winter is June to August and Summer is December to February.

If you're coming in any of those months then you need to dress for the occasion.

Paying particular attention to the winter, you can add extra layers of clothing beneath your sweatshirt.
I've seen people going as much as 4 layers - first cloth, second cloth, third and fourth before finishing things up with a sweatshirt or jacket.
But I prefer Thermal Wears, popularly called Long John here.

Don't joke with your feet if you're someone who doesn't love the cold! SOCKS! SOCKS!! SOCKS!!!
There are selections of suitable socks for the winter, usually very thick.

Basically depends on what's comfortable for you as some Nigerians enjoy the cold and dress normal; not me though grin

Finally, and most effective, prepare for the cold by getting a Flu Jab!
Go to your GP or the nearest one to get a shot of the flu vaccine prior to winter.
It works magic!


Are there Nigerian food/restaurants etc? Are they very expensive?

Yes, there are quite a few as already stated by previous posts.

And yeah, quite expensive but affordable or commensurate to your wage.

Can one start a business (exportation, consultancy) in Australia?

Yes, you can.
There are people doing well in such.
Not my thing though.

How much does your family survive on in a month?

As a single, I do 50 - 150 bucks per week on groceries.
But there are also weeks when I spend nothing or have a spending spree...
Goes with my mood...
Spend more on those lazy weeks when I'd rather watch movies all weekend, have a lot of junk meals around my bed and eat out all week wink

And any other ...

YES!!!
That intriguing job hunting experience...
To be continued on a later post...

But hope I was able to help someone make the big decision to finally migrate to Oz by sharing my long story...

107 Likes 7 Shares

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Prolivingproof(m): 7:25pm On Oct 21, 2017
catchdwind4rmkd:

hope I was able to help someone make the big decision to finally migrate to Oz by sharing my long story...
@catchwind4rmkd, what an intriguing episode, very motivating and well structured. Nice one mate.

9 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by zanyzara: 7:49pm On Oct 21, 2017
Thank you for the exposé catchdwind4rmkd. Waiting for part 2 grin

Zany

4 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Vinsmuft(m): 7:59pm On Oct 21, 2017
catchdwind4rmkd:


The Victorian govt has thus come up with a new scheme called HomesVIC to be rolled out by Jan 2018.

Thanks for the info bro.

Also want to thank the person who gave me info about using groupon or scoopon for deals on car servicing. Paid for a deal for $79 only and had my car serviced yesterday.

You see why I like this thread.

22 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by vhickky(f): 9:33pm On Oct 21, 2017
good day everyone, please what's the procedure of getting an humanitarian visa, my brother was told to get one for the processing of his admission.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 9:46pm On Oct 21, 2017
vhickky:
good day everyone, please what's the procedure of getting an humanitarian visa, my brother was told to get one for the processing of his admission.

Read the student thread for student visa. It was clearly written on opening page that this thread is not for visa enquiry.

Meanwhile, who is asking him to get humanitarian visa for admission?

Humanitarian visa is for genuine refugees.

11 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by oknee: 10:45pm On Oct 21, 2017
@catchdwind4rmkd

Thanks for your contribution. I particularly love the info on mortgage.

2 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by catchdwind4rmkd(m): 1:23am On Oct 22, 2017
Hi,

hope you're coming around for the Buffett next Sunday?
Let's use the avenue to finally meet.

Sorry I've not been able to reach out since the last communication.
It's been quite a busy month for me.

Cheers!

oknee:
@catchdwind4rmkd

Thanks for your contribution. I particularly love the info on mortgage.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by catchdwind4rmkd(m): 1:59am On Oct 22, 2017
No worries mate.

Hope we're seeing you at the get together next weekend?

And thanks for bringing the groupon up again, I'd need that as mine is due for manufacturer's major servicing.
Hope I find a great deal too.

Cheers!

Vinsmuft:


Thanks for the info bro.

Also want to thank the person who gave me info about using groupon or scoopon for deals on car servicing. Paid for a deal for $79 only and had my car serviced yesterday.

You see why I like this thread.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by vhickky(f): 7:58am On Oct 22, 2017
bellong:


Read the student thread for student visa. It was clearly written on opening page that this thread is not for visa enquiry.

Meanwhile, who is asking him to get humanitarian visa for admission?

Humanitarian visa is for genuine refugees.
yup...I am sorry, I posted on the wrong thread....already rectified the mistake...
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by kamotisha: 12:00pm On Oct 22, 2017
@catchwind4rmkd

God bless you. Waiting for pt 2.

4 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by hollie2605: 4:39pm On Oct 22, 2017
@catchwind4rmkd

Good to finally hear from someone that migrated initially on a temporary visa which am assuming is the 489 visa (am I right?). Please what are the pros and cons to this visa? Am migrating with my family on this visa and would like to know what to expect.

Please help a sister; relocating to FSC NSW. Thank you so much for giving back and I hope to do the same to encourage people coming on this visa

5 Likes 1 Share

(1) (2) (3) ... (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) ... (105) (Reply)

General German Student Visa Enquiries Part 6 / General German Student Visa Enquiries Part 7 / DV 2014 Winners Meet Here

Viewing this topic: ayenikunle

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2020 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See How To Advertise. 321
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.