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What Is The Islamic View On Aje? - Islam for Muslims - Nairaland

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What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by nisai: 10:42am On Jan 03, 2018
As we all know in Yoruba language, some words have absorbed and become our every day use. One of these words is 'aje'.

Whenever Yoruba people see a person that's about to set out for a trade or business, they will say 'aje awa ooo' or 'aje agbe e oo' . When one performs an act that could ruin business, they will exclaim and say 'ota aje'.

What is Aje according to the Yorubas? Culturally,Aje is a Godess of wealth and economic prosperity, this orisha aid the accumulation of wealth and prevent dwindling of one’s economic growth. Linguistically, I believe Aje simply means wealth.

Some Yoruba Islamic scholars argued against the use of this word for wishing quick turnover on ourselves in businesses. They claim it originated from shrikh (polytheism).

Now my contention is: from the linguistic angle, can we say 'aje awa'?

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by nisai: 10:46am On Jan 03, 2018
nisai:
As we all know in Yoruba language, some words have absorbed and become our every day use. One of these words is 'aje'.

Whenever Yoruba people see a person that's about to set out for a trade or business, they will say 'aje awa ooo' or 'aje agbe e oo' . When one performs an act that could ruin business, they will exclaim and say 'ota aje'.

What is Aje according to the Yorubas? Culturally,Aje is a Godess of wealth and economic prosperity, this orisha aid the accumulation of wealth and prevent dwindling of one’s economic growth. Linguistically, I believe Aje simply means wealth.

Some Yoruba Islamic scholars argued against the use of this word for wishing quick turnover on ourselves in businesses. They claim it originated from shrikh (polytheism).

Now my contention is: from the linguistic angle, can't we say 'aje awa'?
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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by usba: 2:09pm On Jan 03, 2018
It is advised you give yourself names that connate positiveness and goodness as against name that are bad. It might not really be a sin calling yourself a witch, like I have read of a Muslim leader in the past that called himself blood shedder to frighten his enemies... But generally such negative names or nick names to be precise will fall into what is disliked (Makrooh) not a sin but not an encourageble and advised to avoid.

On the other hand the polytheistic origins of the names is enough reason to avoid using such names so as to not adopt their culture. Others might want to contribute.

Allah knows best.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 6:33pm On Jan 03, 2018
I think from linguistic angle it is okay. Allah created every nation with their own palava. Surah Haj 67

"To every People have We appointed rites and ceremonies which they must follow: let them not then dispute with thee on the matter, but do thou invite (them) to thy Lord: for thou art assuredly on the Right Way".


I simply don't believe in the idea of "god of Wealth" in Yoruba sense. There is no need to argue this either because, from muslim perspective 'God of wealth' is Allah. He is the Provider, The Sustainer and The Source of wealth. I believe the Yorubas at the time simply got it wrong the way Arab multiplied their gods in those days, believing that when calamities befell them, another god was responsible for that. When they bore a child, anther god was responsible for that. When they were rich another god was responsible for that etc. But we know Allah alone is responsible for all.


So there is no need for any Alfa to start arguing about whether the use if "Aje awa oo" is acceptable or not, and the youths start causing problems and creating nuisance around town over this.


Allah – there is no deity except Him, the Ever-Living, the Sustainer of [all] existence. Neither drowsiness overtakes Him nor sleep. To Him belongs whatever is in the heavens and whatever is on the earth. (Al-Baqarah 2:255)


It is the same scenario with "olugbohun". Allah lo n je be in the sense that there is "kun fa yakun" in the Qur'an.

Wallahu Allam


Ps, i actually thought you were talking about Aje (witches) when i read the title

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Rashduct4luv(m): 7:22pm On Jan 03, 2018
I think some Yoruba terms are akin to kufr and this is included. Going by the history of Yoruba, Aje is simply a diety of wealth. No doubt the meaning may not be the same as the Yorubas use it nowadays but the origin still remains kufr. It's better to move far from kufr.
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Aje a wa.
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Ògún ngbọ or swearing by any creature!
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And some other superstitions believed by the Yorubas.
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May Allah keep us safe from kufr(disbelief) till the end. Aameen.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 7:34pm On Jan 03, 2018
Rashduct4luv:
Aje a wa.
.
.
It is no longer a case of "deity of wealth" in yorubaland generally anymore. Aje awa is now understood to mean something like more blessings, money, customer patronage etc.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the use of the phrase. It is the same as visiting graves. The practice predates islam. But Islam does not condemn the practice. The problem only lies with individual who believe "Aje" is a deity that provides wealth. But to the general public and average Yoruba, it is a mere phrase of blessings, wealth etc just like saying "Aata ooo or Ee taooo"

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Rashduct4luv(m): 7:53pm On Jan 03, 2018
Empiree:
It is no longer a case of "deity of wealth" in yorubaland generally anymore. Aje awa is now understood to mean something like more blessings, money, customer patronage etc.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the use of the phrase. It is the same as visiting graves. The practice predates islam. But Islam does not condemn the practice. The problem only lies with individual who believe "Aje" is a deity that provides wealth. But to the general public and average Yoruba, it is a mere phrase of blessings, wealth etc just like saying "Aata ooo or Ee taooo"
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Why not simply go with what is not doubtful?
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Can I say Ogun ngbọ too while implying that I am simply saying the truth?
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What is haram is clear! What is halal is clear. Let's leave whatever is doubtful.
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Aata ooo,

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 8:27pm On Jan 03, 2018
Rashduct4luv:

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Why not simply go with what is not doubtful?
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Can I say Ogun ngbọ too while implying that I am simply saying the truth?
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What is haram is clear! What is halal is clear. Let's leave whatever is doubtful.
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Aata ooo,
Aba, why are you dragging it?. Are you then saying all muslims in the past who have used the phrase without second thought of deity associated with it were mushrikun?. There is nothing doubtful here. That's why i gave you example of ziyara to the graves unless you wanna say to stop visiting graves too?. How do you say to your wife when she gets ready for market in the morning?

6 Likes

Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Rashduct4luv(m): 9:43pm On Jan 03, 2018
Empiree:
Aba, why are you dragging it?. Are you then saying all muslims in the past who have used the phrase without second thought of deity associated with it were mushrik?. There is nothing doubtful here. That's why i gave you example of ziyara to the graves unless you wanna say to stop visiting graves too to stay away from doubt?. How do you say to your wife when she gets ready for marketing the morning?
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My wife understands this perfectly and the position is to leave that which is doubtful!
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I never mentioned Mushrik or Shirk in my comments as I understand it's conditions...
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ẹẹta àbí wàá ta. It's simple.
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Muslims in the past will be judged according to the information reaching them about Islam, their striving, arrogance, etc. And we too would be judged similarly without the least injustice.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 9:58pm On Jan 03, 2018
Rashduct4luv:

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My wife understands this perfectly and the position is to leave that which is doubtful!
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I never mentioned Mushrik or Shirk in my comments as I understand it's conditions...
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ẹẹta àbí wàá ta. It's simple.
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Muslims in the past will be judged according to the information reaching them about Islam, their striving, arrogance, etc. And we too would be judged similarly without the least injustice.
good if you are on mutual understanding. But my position stands that "Aje awa oo" or ete oo means nothing but form of consumers' greetings. No deities/gods trash attached. Period.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Rashduct4luv(m): 11:04pm On Jan 03, 2018
Empiree:
good if you are on mutual understanding. But my position stands that "Aje awa oo" or ete oo means nothing but form of consumers' greetings. No deities/gods trash attached. Period.
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Alhamdulillah! That's your position!
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This hadeeth was narrated by at-Tirmidhi (2442), Ahmad (1630) and Ibn Hibbaan (722) from al-Hasan ibn ‘Ali (may Allah be pleased with him) who said: I memorized from the Messenger of Allah (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him): “Leave that which makes you doubt for that which does not make you doubt, for truth leads to reassurance and lies lead to uncertainty.” Classed as saheeh by Shaykh al-Albaani (may Allah have mercy on him).
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This hadeeth highlights the importance of being careful when faced with doubtful and dubious matters, and keeping away from them, because in the case of that which is definitely halaal, the believer will have no doubt in his heart concerning it – and doubt here means anxiety and worry – rather he will feel at ease and will have reassurance in his heart. As for that which is doubtful, he will feel anxiety and worry concerning it.
End quote from Jaami‘ al-‘Uloom wa’l-Hukam , 1/280.
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And finally, the minutest student of knowledge who knows the basics of Tawheed Ar-Roobubiyyah and Al-Uloohiyyah will know that Allah is the sole director of our affairs and Allah is the only One to be worshipped!
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Aje is the name of a Yoruba diety!
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And you are praying for sales to Allah right or to whom?
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Please let's forget this!
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May Allah guide us all.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 11:59pm On Jan 03, 2018
Rashduct4luv:

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Alhamdulillah! That's your position!
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This hadeeth was narrated by at-Tirmidhi (2442), Ahmad (1630) and Ibn Hibbaan (722) from al-Hasan ibn ‘Ali (may Allah be pleased with him) who said: I memorized from the Messenger of Allah (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him): “Leave that which makes you doubt for that which does not make you doubt, for truth leads to reassurance and lies lead to uncertainty.” Classed as saheeh by Shaykh al-Albaani (may Allah have mercy on him).
.
This hadeeth highlights the importance of being careful when faced with doubtful and dubious matters, and keeping away from them, because in the case of that which is definitely halaal, the believer will have no doubt in his heart concerning it – and doubt here means anxiety and worry – rather he will feel at ease and will have reassurance in his heart. As for that which is doubtful, he will feel anxiety and worry concerning it.
End quote from Jaami‘ al-‘Uloom wa’l-Hukam , 1/280.
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And finally, the minutest student of knowledge who knows the basics of Tawheed Ar-Roobubiyyah and Al-Uloohiyyah will know that Allah is the sole director of our affairs and Allah is the only One to be worshipped!
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Aje is the name of a Yoruba diety!
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And you are praying for sales to Allah right or to whom?
.
.
Please let's forget this!
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May Allah guide us all.
Did i tell you i am in doubt?. You keep saying Ajè means deity. That's your definition not me and definitely not majority. I sensed this would happened when i posted my first post here. Ajè is MONEY not deity. Not "god of wealth". It is the same as saying "Ajè a wa yin wa oo as òwó a wa yin wa ooo". If Ajè is god to you, thats your problem. I don't have any doubt in anything. You placed that in my mouth. Why are you complicating yourself?


Soon you gonna start telling people that saying "e ku oro ajè oo" is shirk, and youths start stomping their feet on everyone that saying "Ajè is ebo" (shirk). Yet, they use Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday which are names of gods of your colonial masters. Why not stay away from using these? Saying "A ku oro aje oo" is like saying "a ku oro MONEY" grin

Whats that gotta do with deity? shocked


Ajè a wa means money a wa

A ku oro ajè means a ku oro owo

"Ajè (deity or god) as you want to force it on me doesn't exist.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by abdelrahman: 4:01am On Jan 04, 2018
Rashduct4luv:

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Why not simply go with what is not doubtful?
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Can I say Ogun ngbọ too while implying that I am simply saying the truth?
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What is haram is clear! What is halal is clear. Let's leave whatever is doubtful.
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Aata ooo,
stop showing your ignorancy.

3 Likes

Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by AlBaqir(m): 6:39am On Jan 04, 2018
Rashduct4luv:

.

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ẹẹta àbí wàá ta. It's simple.

# Empiree, I totally agree with this guy on this. The interesting part of it is that 85% of those who used the word did not even know its root. However, once being told and there's alternative word in lieu of it, isn't it safe and better to stay off it? There's nothing linguistic here.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Rashduct4luv(m): 9:18am On Jan 04, 2018
abdelrahman:
stop showing your ignorancy.
. And stop showing your folly!
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by abdelrahman: 10:05am On Jan 04, 2018
Rashduct4luv:

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And stop showing your folly!
but dude is using january and monday that is idol names.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Rashduct4luv(m): 2:21pm On Jan 04, 2018
abdelrahman:
but dude is using january and monday that is idol names.
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Can you tell us the Islamic date today sincerely without copying or asking?
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by abdelrahman: 2:55pm On Jan 04, 2018
Rashduct4luv:

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Can you tell us the Islamic date today sincerely without copying or asking?
so you mean using of idol names for days is good?

2 Likes

Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 3:57pm On Jan 04, 2018
I still don't know what's the big deal here. Aje is MONEY for crying out loud. What people thought about it culturally those days is practically and literally irrelevant now.

Christians Arabs misconstrue ALLAH as well, does that stop Muslims from using ALLAH?. Remember Wasiu Ayinde''s song where he sings "owo owo...aje aje". He wasn't referring any deity but money. Even money ritualists, if they succeed in their ritual plans and money is gotten from it, they scream 'aje re (owo re)'. They aren't refering to deity.

If culturally some believe Aje is an entity for the provision of wealth, that's their definition. That's their palava.

And yoruba name for Monday is "òjó ájé". In this context it is referring to "business day". Some people sing 'waka' like "àjé wa mi wa", simply means "chasing bag". None of these have god or deity or supernatural connotations. So I don't know what the big deal here.

Aje as in "god of wealth" is fictional character. To believe in that is kufr. If you don't feel comfortable using AJE, that's you. There are many synonymous words use for something. Aje is one of them for money.

And no one here relegates Islamic given names for these things which are sunnah. Islam is not against culture for as long as it is not in conflict with it. If you live in the West where your phone or Internet activities may be easily tapped, say for instance you are talking about money on the phone and you don't want authority know what your conversation is about, the first thing you do is you don't speak English. This doesn't mean they don't know your language. They most likely know owo means money, owo is common word for money.

In that case, you want to use "ijinle" yoruba or a more complicated word for money. You can easily use Àjé to confuse them because when it comes to "moving money", authority most likely listen to your conversations. This is why people who do fraud to get immigration paper use the word "pali" instead of documents or papers.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Rashduct4luv(m): 4:42pm On Jan 04, 2018
abdelrahman:
so you mean using of idol names for days is good?
.
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You can create another thread for that.
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by abdelrahman: 4:51pm On Jan 04, 2018
Rashduct4luv:
. . You can create another thread for that.
Lobatan!
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by AlBaqir(m): 5:35pm On Jan 04, 2018
Empiree:
I still don't know what's the big deal here. Aje is MONEY for crying out loud. What people thought about it culturally those days is practically and literally irrelevant now.

Christians Arabs misconstrue ALLAH as well, does that stop Muslims from using ALLAH?. Remember Wasiu Ayinde''s song where he sings "owo owo...aje aje". He wasn't referring any deity but money. Even money ritualists, if they succeed in their ritual plans and money is gotten from it, they scream 'aje re (owo re)'. They aren't refering to deity.

If culturally some believe Aje is an entity for the provision of wealth, that's their definition. That's their palava.

And yoruba name for Monday is "òjó ájé". In this context it is referring to "business day". Some people sing 'waka' like "àjé wa mi wa", simply means "chasing bag". None of these have god or deity or supernatural connotations. So I don't know what the big deal here.

Aje as in "god of wealth" is fictional character. To believe in that is kufr. If you don't feel comfortable using AJE, that's you. There are many synonymous words use for something. Aje is one of them for money.

And no one here relegates Islamic given names for these things which are sunnah. Islam is not against culture for as long as it is not in conflict with it. If you live in the West where your phone or Internet activities may be easily tapped, say for instance you are talking about money on the phone and you don't want authority know what your conversation is about, the first thing you do is you don't speak English. This doesn't mean they don't know your language. They most likely know owo means money, owo is common word for money.

In that case, you want to use "ijinle" yoruba or a more complicated word for money. You can easily use Àjé to confuse them because when it comes to "moving money", authority most likely listen to your conversations. This is why people who do fraud to get immigration paper use the word "pali" instead of documents or papers.


# Empiree, you have nothing to defend here. In fact, none of your assumptions add up. Here's a speech delivered by Dr. Kalejaiye:


A Speech Delivered by DR. DIPO KALEJAIYE at the OLOKUN FESTIVAL At the Palace Square of His Royal Majesty, The Monarch of Onigbongbo in Ikeja Lagos, Oba Yususf Olatunji

.....
This speech is supposed to be about aje the Yoruba concept of wealth creation. I am happy to note in my letter of invitation that the letter heading reads this way Wealth Festival and in Yoruba language Odun Aje. Importantly, this
festival is also taking place on a Monday, traditionally within the Yoruba calendar, Monday is a day referred to as ‘ojo aje’ – the day for making wealth and reaping profits. In musing about this concept, it dawns on me that the concept of ‘Odun’ within the realm of Yoruba religion and
philosophy is likely to refer to the worship and veneration of Yoruba gods and goddesses. Hence, we hear about Odun Ifa the festival of Ifa referring to Orunmila the Yoruba god of divination, Odun Ogun the festival of the Yoruba god of Iron, war, blacksmiths, and hunters, Odun Sango the
festival for the god of thunder and lightning, Odun Oya the festival for the goddess of the sea, and Odun Aje the festival for the veneration and worship of the goddess Aje,
who is the guardian goddess for wealth, profit, wealth creation and sustenance among the Yoruba race.


Aje is responsible for profit making in the market place, and in fact, supervises the entire aspects of life that relates to money. It behoves us to note the special place of this goddess in the traditional economy of the Yoruba race as it centres on the open air market place of old which of course still exists today. The relationship between Yoruba traditional religion and Aje will not be complete if I do not take time to explain how Aje came into the Yoruba cosmos...


www.nico.gov.ng/index.php/category-list/1192-understanding-wealth-creation-aje-through-the-concept-of-yoruba-traditional-religion


# The customary saying of "Ajé a waa o" is simply means "may the goddess of wealth (Ajé) visit you".

# Like I said earlier, majority don't know this or never meant this. However, once you know or told, and there is alternative in lieu of it (e.g " e taa o, Olohun a bayin taa o etc), why insisting on shrik concept "Ajé"?!
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by AlBaqir(m): 5:58pm On Jan 04, 2018
^^
Surah Al-Anaam, Verse 79:

Surely I have turned myself, being upright (hanifan), wholly to Him Who originated the heavens and the earth, and I am not of the polytheists.


Surah Al-Anaam, Verse 59:

And with Him are the keys of the unseen treasures -- none knows them but He; and He knows what is in the land and the sea, and there falls not a leaf but He knows it, nor a grain in the darkness of the earth, nor anything green nor dry but (it is all) in a clear book.


# The Tafsir of the abovementioned verses are clearly spelt out in the below Du'a as taught by Imam Ja'far Sadiq (alaih Salam):

O Allah! surely, I have no knowledge of the main source of my subsistence, and I seek it only through the passing
thoughts that come to my heart, and I wander about in cities searching for it, and I am preplexed in regard to what I search for. I do not know whether it is in a valley or in the
mountains, in the earth or in the heavens, in the continent or in the sea, and in whose hands it is, and from whom it is.

And surely I know that Thou hast its knowledge, and its sources are in Thy hand, and Thou alone distributes it by Thy kindness, and creates opportunities through Thy mercy.

Oh Allah therefore bless Muhammad and his progeny; and
Oh Lord! increase my sustenance, apportioned by Thee, and make easy to search and the source near; and do not make me strive in the search of what Thou hast not decreed from my sustenance. For, surely: Thou art indifferent to chastise me and I need Thy mercy.

Bless Muhammad and his progeny and by Thy grace show generosity to Thy slave, surely Thou art the most generous”
"
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 6:36pm On Jan 04, 2018
^^^

Question is, did those gods and goddesses exist?. Absolutely not. They are fictional characters. It is the same way pre-islamic arabs had many gods for Allah. Whoever believes "aje" is an entity or goddess that provides wealth, it is our collective responsibility to condemn that. The article you posted doesnt even shy away from saying aje is wealth. Those people formed gods and goddesses in their heads, that a god in in charge of water. Another god is in charge of war, another god is in charge of wealth. All these are nonsense. It is the same one God in charge of it all. We simply need to correct them about that. Aje means owo (money) to me. Nothing else. I have no doubt about that. This is why my grandpa cut off any relationship in our family with many Yoruba cultural practices. That's he cut off our kingship lineage when it was his turn.


I have used the word Allah as example. Should we stop using Allah for Creator just bcus Arab christians still use it, and it means the same thing as average christian use God/god?. Some years ago, Palestinian christians during their xmas, placed banner up with inscription "Isa is son of Allah". Palestinian muslims got there to correct them in essence. Remember these christians speak arabic, that's why they easily used Allah and Isa. Why dont they use Jesus and God?

So it is our duty to correct cultural nonsense that Aje is wealth NOT "god of wealth". The same goes with "god of iron", god of this and that. Those things dont exist. Those old people simply got it wrong. I do not believe there is a god of wealth from yoruba perspective. There is only one God. As for the festival of wealth in yoruba concept, we simply should avoid that. Very simple. It is the same way some foolish rich people celebrate "odun owo" i:e festival of money, a fictional musical story by Chief Ebenezer Obey.


"god of wealth" from Yoruba notion does not exist. It is fictional. If it actually exists, only then we can enforce muslims form using it. What we need to do is to PURIFY the name and essence rather than stop people from using it. Prophet Muhammad(P) didnt destroy Kaaba just bcus keferi turned into shirk and kufr. He purified it instead.

Besides, Aje is not a common phrase on a daily basis. So it should never be a subject of controversy. If we start telling people in yorubaland to stop using this and that, we are destroying yoruba heritage. We should purify it and tell people that there is nothing called Aje that provides wealth nor come to visit you at market. I don't believe such nonsense. Remember OWO EYO (cowry) is called Aje, indicating aje is money. So i am not insisting in "shirk concept". I am purifying the essence and concept. As for "e taa ooo". I don't have problem with that. There is always alternative for everything. And people who use "aje a waa", "aje ooo" etc in our generation are baby boomers anyways. Many of us dont.


So Monday is 'ojo aje' – the day for making wealth and reaping profits according to your article. Why didnt author say Monday is the day of the creator of wealth?. Indeed, Monday is rush hour. Everyone chases bag ($$$$) and hustles. I dont freaking care what Yoruba concept of Aje is.

Aje to me means money, مال


Ps, i dont know if any one noticed this. If someone builds a mansion and those mama come to visit, they scream "aje o ku ikale". Money is what they mean not god or goddess of wealth

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by AlBaqir(m): 7:56pm On Jan 04, 2018
Empiree:
^^^

Question is, did those gods and goddesses exist?. Absolutely not. They are fictional characters. It is the same way pre-islamic arabs had many gods for Allah. Whoever believes "aje" is an entity or goddess that provides wealth, it is our collective responsibility to condemn that. The article you posted doesnt even shy away from saying aje is wealth. Those people formed gods and goddesses in their heads, that a god in in charge of water. Another god is in charge of war, another god is in charge of wealth. All these are nonsense. It is the same one God in charge of it all. We simply need to correct them about that. Aje means owo (money) to me. Nothing else. I have no doubt about that.

Empiree, the Yoruba concept of gods is very similar to those Mushriqun of Makkah in the Jahiliyah period. The difference is Yoruba gods are "human demi-gods" while those of Makkah Mushriqun could be of other objects like carved statue. Yoruba too later went into carved statues when their "human demi-gods" died or disappeared.

However, all Mushriqun believed in the One true God, the creator of heavens and earth. They are Mushriqun (polytheists) because they do not believe in the concept of Tawheed af-'al (and other forms of Tawheed).

So, Yes, those "gods" existed either before as "human demi-gods" or today as carved statues which those who believed them continue to venerate and seek help from. In fact, they used them as a means of intercession to God. This, is the area of intercession (tawassul) that Quran condemn and tag shrik. And that is where the salafis got it so wrong.

# underline^^, try hard bro, you cannot change Yoruba historical fact and belief about Ajé olokun. To Yoruba, Owo (money), orò (wealth) are blessings that Ajé used to bestow to people who seek them from her. This is what you should recognise otherwise you will wake up in another thread like this and say, "to me Ògún (Yoruba god of iron) is just an iron and not god".

# Again, to be Hanif like Nabi Ibrahim, you need to distance yourself, your thought and actions from every form of shrik, and set your face wholly to Allah the Creator of samawati wal ar'd.

Empiree:

Ps, i dont know if any one noticed this. If someone builds
a mansion and those mama come to visit, they scream
"aje o ku ikale". Money is what they mean not god or
goddess of wealth

# Not all of them bro.

1. Some meant the goddess of wealth (Ajé)

2. And some ignorantly meant wealth itself. I used the word " ignorant" because they know not the concept of "Ajé".

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 9:02pm On Jan 04, 2018
^^^

I don't deny the fact that some do say "Aje olokun" to bless them with this and that. As you rightly said, if the "gods" did exist, they were human beings, most likely of political, economic and socially affluence people. In another word, public figures that they later idolized after those people or even in their lifetime. And later generation crafted them into some sort of imageries and superstitious beliefs. I dont deny this.

What i denied or said that don't exist are gods and goddesses (unseen) who allegedly happened to have independent powers alongside Allah to provide wealth, power, victory etc, independent of Allah. These don't exist. This is false. It is like babalawo who wakes up in the morning, pours some palm oil on stone in front of his house and says to it something like "let today be great for me". "I am going to war give me victory" etc. If we give folks like that dawah, we say to them, it is not the stone that gives you wealth or make your day great or gives you victory. It is Allah who does that. The stone he idolizes does nothing. No matter how long he is been doing that shirk, no matter how much people venerate such thing, that thing is not God/god. Nobody is there to answer them except by Allah's will.

Same thing applies to Aje. Let's forget about aje means money for now. If truly there is goddess called "Aje", to us as muslims, such thing doesn't exist. It only exist in their brain. It is superstitious belief. There is no "Aje olokun" anywhere unless they invoke jinn to steal money for them. Allah is all source of everything. We should purify that for them. Besides, Aje is not commonly used by many anyways. I still see Aje as a word for money. Nothing more. Not god/goddess who bestows wealth. Allah is the ONLY ar-razzaq الرزاق (Provider/Sustainer). He is Al-Wahhab {Bestower}. I don't believe in other imaginary fairy tales by Yorubas. They have no evidence for their many "gods". I see aje as another word for money just like Igbo called God chineke. If they say i am ignorant, i ask them for evidence of those "gods".

The thing is, these craps should have disappeared long ago just like Arabian but yoruba people are very stubborn like Sheikh Akindele rightly said.

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Empiree: 9:22pm On Jan 04, 2018
nisai, ur thread should hit front page to read views. You need to holla @sissie
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Fundamentalist: 10:05pm On Jan 04, 2018
AlBaqir:


# Empiree, I totally agree with this guy on this. The interesting part of it is that 85% of those who used the word did not even know its root. However, once being told and there's alternative word in lieu of it, isn't it safe and better to stay off it? There's nothing linguistic here.




Sometimes al baqir makes good statements like these, other times he goes completely crazy cheesy cheesy

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by nisai: 11:07am On Jan 05, 2018
Empiree:
nisai, ur thread should hit front page to read views. You need to holla @sissie
OK akhee, will do that.
Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by Jamiubond009(m): 11:20am On Jan 05, 2018
Na wah

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by tintingz(m): 11:42am On Jan 05, 2018
Rashduct4luv:
I think some Yoruba terms are akin to kufr and this is included. Going by the history of Yoruba, Aje is simply a diety of wealth. No doubt the meaning may not be the same as the Yorubas use it nowadays but the origin still remains kufr. It's better to move far from kufr.
.
Aje a wa.
.
Ògún ngbọ or swearing by any creature!
.
And some other superstitions believed by the Yorubas.
.
May Allah keep us safe from kufr(disbelief) till the end. Aameen.
The word Olorun still remains the origin of kafr(unbelievers), Yoruba Muslims should desist from using Olorun in prayers because it's a supreme pagan deity in Yoruba religion pantheon.

You see your ignorance?

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Re: What Is The Islamic View On Aje? by tintingz(m): 11:45am On Jan 05, 2018
AlBaqir:


Empiree, the Yoruba concept of gods is very similar to those Mushriqun of Makkah in the Jahiliyah period. The difference is Yoruba gods are "human demi-gods" while those of Makkah Mushriqun could be of other objects like carved statue. Yoruba too later went into carved statues when their "human demi-gods" died or disappeared.

However, all Mushriqun believed in the One true God, the creator of heavens and earth. They are Mushriqun (polytheists) because they do not believe in the concept of Tawheed af-'al (and other forms of Tawheed).

So, Yes, those "gods" existed either before as "human demi-gods" or today as carved statues which those who believed them continue to venerate and seek help from. In fact, they used them as a means of intercession to God. This, is the area of intercession (tawassul) that Quran condemn and tag shrik. And that is where the salafis got it so wrong.

# underline^^, try hard bro, you cannot change Yoruba historical fact and belief about Ajé olokun. To Yoruba, Owo (money), orò (wealth) are blessings that Ajé used to bestow to people who seek them from her. This is what you should recognise otherwise you will wake up in another thread like this and say, "to me Ògún (Yoruba god of iron) is just an iron and not god".

# Again, to be Hanif like Nabi Ibrahim, you need to distance yourself, your thought and actions from every form of shrik, and set your face wholly to Allah the Creator of samawati wal ar'd.



# Not all of them bro.

1. Some meant the goddess of wealth (Ajé)

2. And some ignorantly meant wealth itself. I used the word " ignorant" because they know not the concept of "Ajé".
Albaqir, can you tell us about Olorun/Olohun origin?

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