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Jobs/Vacancies / Re: Is Xyples LLC Another Job Scam by LamiWilliams: 3:15pm On Aug 18, 2020
So, this is where the scam is! I've been wondering what they stood to gain from this obviously FAKE job alert


They want people's emails and passwords.



Incase you don't know, your email and password can be used to access your bank account, social media account, and other vital information on your phone. Protect your email by enabling 2-Factor Authentication.


Any tech company in the world would know better than to ask for the password for your email.


If you have recieved an email from these people, I would advice that you disregard and ignore. Please, report the "CEO" on LinkedIn here https://www.linkedin.com/in/tochukwuokonkwor. You can also report the company page https://www.linkedin.com/company/xyples


I'm sure this Stan999 guy is one of them. Otherwise, now would he know so much detail like how the scores of the people in a particular session would determine the benchmark score?


These scammers need to be brought to the book. The right authority will find you soon, I promise.


For job seekers, read this guide on how to spot fake job postings or call for interview: https://www./blog/identify-job-scams/


Use Google to find more tips. Finding a job can prove to be a daunting task in Nigeria. But don't be discouraged by these fake jobs ads. Do some research before applying to any job. Also, before going for an interview, make sure you confirm its authenticity on platforms like Nairaland. Good luck to all job seekers!

Stan999:



Let me just break it down for you.

If you would use a public means of transportation, use okada and tell them to drop you off at Federal Housing Authority signboard. Use your google map and locate the place like it was stated in your mail and you should see a close. I was even directed by the security man of the close to the company gate cos I asked him if there was a company there, he said yes and pointed me in the right direction.

Identify with the security man at the gate of the building by showing your nysc and any national id. After which you wash hands and seat in a well spaced position that observes social distancing.

Seat and wait till your session is due to enter.

On entering, he would likely spend an hour addressing your set on dos and don'ts and would entertain questions also from you.

The questions would be set using 7 pages of Google forms and you would have to login to your email on the laptop you would be given to access the link. So my advice is be computer literate and also remember your email password cos a guy had difficulty login to his email during the onboarding process.

The questions are relatively cheap take it from me. It's below GMAT standard. Just be calm and smart in answering them. I finished in 30mins and you can do lesser.

When you are done, you should get a congratulatory message if you are successful cos the company uses an algorithm whereby the average of the scores of the people in a particular session is used as benchmark for pass or fail. So in essence, you guys are the determinants of your pass score. No standard was set by the company.

All the best

1 Like

Business / Re: Nairaland Business Scam: The Ultimate Guide To Avoid Falling Victim by LamiWilliams: 5:05pm On Nov 10, 2019
Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:

1. Wonky Language
This is a definite no no. Companies take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.

2. No online visibility
In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here

3. Non Branded Email
Branding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that companies usually have their employees assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company’s names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verifybefore applying.

4. WhatsApp Interview Notification
We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.

5. Miracle Jobs
These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.

6. They want money
Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.

An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of the time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interviews. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows you to verify if a job posting is real or not.

Use it now share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives!

Jobs/Vacancies / Re: How To Detect A SCAM Interview Using Nairaland by LamiWilliams: 11:25am On Nov 10, 2019
Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:



1. Wonky Language

This is a definite no no. Companies take extra take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.



2. No online visibility

In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here



3. Non Branded Email

Branding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that comapnies usually have their employee’s assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company is names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verify before applying.



4. WhatsApp Interview Notification

We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this is ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.



5. Miracle jobs

These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the Internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.


6. They want money.

Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.


An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interview. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows your to verify if a job posting is real or not. Use it now and share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives.

10 Likes 1 Share

Jobs/Vacancies / Re: See A List Of Fake Job Interview Venues! by LamiWilliams: 11:25am On Nov 10, 2019
Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:



1. Wonky Language

This is a definite no no. Companies take extra take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.



2. No online visibility

In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here



3. Non Branded Email

Branding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that comapnies usually have their employee’s assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company is names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verify before applying.



4. WhatsApp Interview Notification

We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this is ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.



5. Miracle jobs

These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the Internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.


6. They want money.

Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.


An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interview. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows your to verify if a job posting is real or not. Use it now and share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives.
Jobs/Vacancies / Re: Fake Job Interview by LamiWilliams: 11:23am On Nov 10, 2019
Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:



1. Wonky Language



This is a definite no no. Companies take extra take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.







2. No online visibility



In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here







3. Non Branded Email



Branding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that comapnies usually have their employee’s assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company is names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verify before applying.







4. WhatsApp Interview Notification



We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this is ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.







5. Miracle jobs



These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the Internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.



6. They want money.



Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.



An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interview. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows your to verify if a job posting is real or not. Use it now and share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives.
Jobs/Vacancies / Re: Compiled List Of Fake Job Addresses ( Beware ) by LamiWilliams: 11:21am On Nov 10, 2019
Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:



1. Wonky Language



This is a definite no no. Companies take extra take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.







2. No online visibility



In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here







3. Non Branded Email



Branding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that comapnies usually have their employee’s assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company is names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verify before applying.







4. WhatsApp Interview Notification



We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this is ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.







5. Miracle jobs



These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the Internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.



6. They want money.



Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.



An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interview. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows your to verify if a job posting is real or not. Use it now and share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives.
Jobs/Vacancies / Re: FAKE INTERVIEW [text Messages] by LamiWilliams: 11:20am On Nov 10, 2019
David received an email about an interview for Sales Rep job in Lagos with a remarkable salary and immediate employment offer. Although he lived in Akure, he reasoned that this was a once in a life time opportunity he could not pass up and decided to travel down to Lagos. He was unemployed, and had no money, so he borrowed some some money from his friend, and promised to pay back at the end of the month since he was getting definitely getting job! He bought new shoes, tie, and suit because he had to look good. He even read up possible interview questions for a Sales Rep job. David was so prepared and he knew that there was no way he was not getting the job!



He had applied for so many jobs and one was finally paying off! Wait. Which one? He didn’t think about it.



He left on Sunday afternoon, as his interview was 8am on Monday. His aging mother was filled with joy and sent him along with good wishes. He crashed at his friend’s place when he got to Lagos. The next morning, he left as early as the 5am to beat any traffic he had always heard was a norm in Lagos. His friend described the routes, and David got it because he was so so smart.



Finally, he got to the company a few minutes before 7am. He noticed that the area looked secluded, but didn’t think too much about it. The excitement was too much. He got in and met a huge crowd of people who also came for the interview. There was no longer a place to sit, so he stood beside Cythina who came all the way from Akwa Ibom. At half past 8, the job poster, Zion Magalicious, called everyone’s attention. In their eagerness and excitement, he began to tell them about an amazing opportunity that would get then 500k within two weeks for which they only need to pay 10k to join.



What do you think David and Cynthia did?


Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:



1. Wonky Language



This is a definite no no. Companies take extra take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.







2. No online visibility



In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here







3. Non Branded Email



Branding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that comapnies usually have their employee’s assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company is names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verify before applying.







4. WhatsApp Interview Notification



We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this is ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.







5. Miracle jobs



These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the Internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.



6. They want money.



Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.



An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interview. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows your to verify if a job posting is real or not. Use it now and share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives.
Jobs/Vacancies / Re: How To Identify A Scam Interview Invitation by LamiWilliams: 11:18am On Nov 10, 2019
Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:


1. Wonky Language

This is a definite no no. Companies take extra take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.



2. No online visibility

In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here



3. Non Branded EmailBranding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that comapnies usually have their employee’s assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company is names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verify before applying.



4. WhatsApp Interview Notification
We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this is ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.


5. Miracle jobs
These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the Internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.



6. They want money.

Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.


An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interview. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows your to verify if a job posting is real or not. Use it now and share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives
Jobs/Vacancies / 6 Tips On Spotting A Fake Job Posting by LamiWilliams: 11:12am On Nov 10, 2019
David received an email about an interview for Sales Rep job in Lagos with a remarkable salary and immediate employment offer. Although he lived in Akure, he reasoned that this was a once in a life time opportunity he could not pass up and decided to travel down to Lagos. He was unemployed, and had no money, so he borrowed some some money from his friend, and promised to pay back at the end of the month since he was getting definitely getting job! He bought new shoes, tie, and suit because he had to look good. He even read up possible interview questions for a Sales Rep job. David was so prepared and he knew that there was no way he was not getting the job!



He had applied for so many jobs and one was finally paying off! Wait. Which one? He didn’t think about it.



He left on Sunday afternoon, as his interview was 8am on Monday. His aging mother was filled with joy and sent him along with good wishes. He crashed at his friend’s place when he got to Lagos. The next morning, he left as early as the 5am to beat any traffic he had always heard was a norm in Lagos. His friend described the routes, and David got it because he was so so smart.



Finally, he got to the company a few minutes before 7am. He noticed that the area looked secluded, but didn’t think too much about it. The excitement was too much. He got in and met a huge crowd of people who also came for the interview. There was no longer a place to sit, so he stood beside Cythina who came all the way from Akwa Ibom. At half past 8, the job poster, Zion Magalicious, called everyone’s attention. In their eagerness and excitement, he began to tell them about an amazing opportunity that would get then 500k within two weeks for which they only need to pay 10k to join.


What do you think David and Cynthia did?


Don’t fall victim to these totally avoidable job scams. Here are some ways to identify false job postings and avoid them:



1. Wonky Language

This is a definite no no. Companies take extra take extra time to proofread their job postings. If you find grammatical or spelling errors in a jobs ad, it is most likely fake. Always verify any posting or call for interview you come across.



2. No online visibility

In this digital age, companies know that they have to have an online presence. In fact, no online presence means you’re not serious about getting your product/service to your target audience. When you get an call for interview email or see a job posting online, Google the company. If you find nothing about the company, don’t waste your time with it anymore. Some scammers could go the extra mile and create an online presence. Look out for companies who have suspicious domain names, have no contact address/phone number, have no real information about they what they do. In any case, to be extra sure, copy the job ad or website here


3. Non Branded Email

Branding is key with companies these days. If you have taken note, you would see that comapnies usually have their employee’s assigned to their company’s name. So, if a company is names WriteAssit, an employee’s email would be esthersmith@writeassist.com. If a job posting says you should send an email to an @gmail.com or @yahoo.com email, think twice and verify before applying.


4. WhatsApp Interview Notification

We get that the professional world is working hard towards making the job application process more friendly, but this is ain’t it. No real call for interview would be sent to you via WhatsApp. Companies would rather email, call, or send you a text message with enough details about their company including a website. If you are scheduled for a remote interview via Skype or phone call, that’s acceptable. Anyway, confirming would keep you safe.



5. Miracle jobs


These scammers know that people are desperate for employment. Unfortunately, they play on that and release mouth-watering offers that seem too good to be true. Be careful of job postings with extremely high salaries for jobs that usually have lesser pays. They also siphon email and phone numbers from the Internet and randomly send interview emails or text messages. If you did not apply for a job, you most likely won’t be “miraculously” called for a job interview.



6. They want money.

Think about it; they need you to pay them to pay you? It’s a big no. Don’t apply. Companies usually won’t require you to pay for an interview.



An advice for you is that you should not sign up on every job platform you see. A lot of time, your details get siphoned that way and you become a prey to scam job posting and call for interview. Also, trust your instincts. If you feel something is not right, do your research. Itarj.com (Is this a real job?) is a great tool that allows your to verify if a job posting is real or not. Use it now and share with friends and family! You would literally be saving lives.
Education / Looking To Groom Your Tech Skills? by LamiWilliams: 6:47pm On Nov 06, 2019
Not everything is as difficult as it sounds"

This was one of the most handy lessons I learnt to far on my journey with StartNG. Truly, there were lots of other valuable take homes, and I think it would be better to make a list. If you are interested in learning software development, digital marketing, machine learning, UI/UX design, and gain the right knowledge on how to apply them to make money, this article.

===

Story time
... it all started at when I visited start.ng
Flash back to the 22nd on September, 2019 when I wrote about my experience at start.ng:
First of all, we (preinterns) have been introduced to some really handy websites/softwares/applications such as Cloudinary, GitHub, Evernote, amongst others. We have also been exposed to Slack which we use as our workspace. In one way or the other I've used these for the tasks I've been doing.

At StartNG, we've also been introduced to HTML and CSS. We were given a task to create a CV using HTML. The only programming knowledge I had prior to StartNG was Java. I even have to confess that I have forgotten more than half of what I learnt about Java �. When I stopped my Java classes, someone suggested I take up HTML. Long story short, I didn't.

When I signed up for StartNG, I was exited about reviving my programming knowledge. I felt a pang of regret when we were given the HTML task. "If I had learnt HTML when I had the opportunity, my task would have been a piece of cake", I said to myself. I got a bit scared about even making an attempt. Nevertheless, with the resources gotten from Slack and from what I could find online, I began to create my HTML CV.

Surprisingly, it was easier than I thought, and I really enjoyed the process. In bid to make my CV look good, I started to think of ways to add colours. I couldn't do an thorough research because I was working with time as at then. I got my eureka � moment when I we were told to add an image link from Cloudinary! �

Using Adobe Spark Post, Snapseed, and Cloudinary, I was able to create and insert coloured headers into my CV. Take a look at these:

I not only feel that I was stretched to infuse creativity into my work, I also feel really fulfilled that I did something I consider amazing! Unlike before, I won't let go of this opportunity.

Sidenote:
Here are a couple of things I'd like to share with you. They are some of the things I've learnt from StartNG:

Embrace Team Work!
I'm glad that this started way before people began to be rewarded for helping others. It shows that people genuinely want to help. I think such willingness to assist AT ALL TIMES is unique to the tech world. From this, I learnt to always share the little I know too. This is also aided by the communal feel of StartNG's workplace on Slack. One never feels out of place anytime.

Never ever give up ✊�
This post is an example of me applying the "never ever give up" lesson I've learnt from Slack. After painstakingly creating my CV, I started battling with GitHub. A number of factors such as work, not getting it right, not meeting the deadline for submission, and fear delayed my progress.

When I saw the "About-to-give-up" channel on Slack, I got encouraged, but it was shortlived. It felt like I wasn't making any progress. I asked for help and got a number of responses from people. With their assistance, I was able to get my html file pushed to Git and and do all the rest of the tasks.

I have to say this again, "not everything is as difficult as it sounds". This might sound silly, but the technical words like 'repository', 'readme', scared me ��.... Anyway, I'm glad I got everything done.

On a final more, and most importantly, I thank HNGNigeria for this amazing opportunity! The work/learning environment has been so much fun. I have been enjoying the difference.

*** Back to the present***
Need I tell you more? Start.ng is the best tech pre-internship you can get anywhere. Go on not to start.ng to register and get more information!
Career / Re: Vacancies For Subject Teachers by LamiWilliams: 1:57am On Oct 29, 2019
Get the perfect CV for that will surely get you accepted for this job at https://write-assist.myshopify.com/

eminencetoba
post=83459722:

Hello guys, should you know anyone who teaches the following subjects:
•Phonics
•French
•Technical Drawing
•Fine Arts
•ICT
• Music
• Yoruba
• PHE
•Arts, Commerce and Science subjects


Locations
•Lagos, Ibadan and Ogun

Renumeration:
Attractive payment.


Tell them to visit www.syllaboss.com.ng/teacher.php to submit their CV.

Education / Re: Guide To Foreign Admission Statement Of Purpose by LamiWilliams: 1:50am On Oct 29, 2019
One other way to ensure that you have a perfect CV is to download a CV Template

[quote author=SOPWRITER1 post=83548730][/quote]
Jobs/Vacancies / Re: Get Your Upwork Account Verified In Minutes by LamiWilliams: 10:26am On Oct 08, 2019
My interest in freelancing began about two years ago, but I felt like I didn't have a chance in freelancing platforms for some reason. I attended an online Upwork training session in August, and that mindset changed. Really valuable information about being a freelancer on Upwork were shared.

When I did my registration, I got unapproved twice. HushTee came in at this point and I got approved was done super fast ���

Now, my account is set! Thank you, Hush Tee �

HushTee:
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I know how difficult it is to get on Upwork as a Nigerian and get verified.

I have been running my Verified Nigerian Upwork Account since November 2017, and have opened several Verified Nigerian Upwork Accounts for a number of people. I have done my Upwork Video Verification and Upwork ID Verification to earn me a blue tick (just like the one we see on Twitter and Instagram).

I will help you get your Upwork account verified, and show you other tricks to getting more jobs and growing on Upwork

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I'm also top rated on upwork, and know the in and out of working on Upwork that I developed an Upwork Course totally FREE. I’ll add you to the next class if you’re interested

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