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Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential - Agriculture - Nairaland

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Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 1:44pm On Aug 05, 2014
We provide Plantain suckers with rapid growth, early fruiting, and high yield potential.
(Giant Elephant Plantain Specie a.k.a AGBAGBA ERIN).
Large quantities and as much as you demand.

A sucker is the lateral shoot that develops from the rhizome and usually emerges close to the parent plant. Farmers traditionally depend on this natural regeneration process to replace their Plantain plants. They often remove all the suckers on a mat, except for the one selected to replace the mother plant.

Conventional planting materials require less inputs and can be planted immediately in the field, unlike the more fragile tissue-culture plantlets, which need to be hardened before planting. Tissue-culture plantlets also require appropriate management practices right after being transplanted to the field

We deliver to any city in Nigeria

Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Kollybrightu(m): 7:50pm On Aug 05, 2014
FarmBusiness: We provide Plantain suckers with rapid growth, early fruiting, and high yield potential.
(Giant Elephant Plantain Specie a.k.a AGBAGBA ERIN).
Large quantities and as much as you demand.

A sucker is the lateral shoot that develops from the rhizome and usually emerges close to the parent plant. Farmers traditionally depend on this natural regeneration process to replace their Plantain plants. They often remove all the suckers on a mat, except for the one selected to replace the mother plant.

Conventional planting materials require less inputs and can be planted immediately in the field, unlike the more fragile tissue-culture plantlets, which need to be hardened before planting. Tissue-culture plantlets also require appropriate management practices right after being transplanted to the field

We deliver to any city in Nigeria
i need 200 suckers
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 12:37pm On Aug 06, 2014
Unlike starting other tree farms, starting a plantain farm and growing plantain are easier and less complicated. Although growing plantain still require ones attention, the level of skill required is not as intensive as other trees.

Here are a few guidelines in growing plantain and starting a plantain farm.
The first thing to consider in starting a plantain farm is looking for the right climate. Plantain cannot thrive in an environment that is too hot or too cold. The plantain plantation must have a good drainage system .A rich, naturally fertilized soil is the ideal for planting Planatain. If such is not available, one can create compost and add chicken manure.

Plantain plants also grow best in bunches or groups because they protect each other from the harsh rays of the sun. It is important to create an environment where the plantain plants are sheltered either because they are bunched up together or there are other trees to protect them. It is important to maintain the humidity of the plantain plantation.


Considering that a plantain plant is not a tree but a type of herb, they cannot actually be grown from seeds like most trees. Plantain plants are grown through suckers. Suckers are those that grow from a dying, mature plantain plant that can be transplanted and re-grown. They may be considered as baby plants that are used to start new plantain plants. Choose suckers from plants that are vigorous. They should have small, spear shaped leaves and are about one foot high.
There is a corm at the bottom of each mature plantain tree. In transplanting a sucker, it is necessary to cut downwards and get as much corm and root as possible. Plant these and cut or decapitate the sucker to facilitate good evaporation. Keep around two to five meters between planted suckers. In the early days of your plant, keep them moist but not too wet as they don’t have leaves yet to evaporate the water.

As the plantain grows, it is important to protect it from strong winds. It is also important to keep it well watered. One can also sprinkle fertilizers every now and then but mostly throwing the plantain dead leaves back into the plant is enough to sustain the rich quality of the soil. Unlike other trees, plantain do not need complicated pruning. Just remove dead leaves and dead plants near the plantain. Also remove suckers from the plant keeping only one or two that have spear shaped leaves. You can replant removed suckers if you have space to plant them

Plantain production in Africa is estimated at more than 50% of worldwide production. The majority (82%) of plantains in Africa are produced in the area stretching from the lowlands of Guinea and Liberia to the central basin of the Democratic Republic of Congo. West and Central Africa contribute 61 and 21%, respectively (FAO). It is estimated that about 70 million people in West and Central Africa derive more than 25% of their carbohydrates from plantains, making them one of the most important sources of food energy throughout the African lowland humid forest zone. Nigeria is one of the largest plantain producing countries in the world. Despite its prominence, Nigeria does not feature among plantain exporting nations because it produces more for local consumption than for export. National per capita consumption figures show its importance relative to other starch staples. However, these figures do not show regional reliance, which is often very important for highly perishable crops that are usually consumed in or near areas of production. The consumption of plantain has risen tremendously in Nigeria in recent years because of the rapidly increasing urbanization and the great demand for easy and convenient foods by the non-farming urban populations. Besides being the staple for many people in more humid regions, plantain is a delicacy and favored snack for people even in other ecologies. A growing industry, mainly plantain chips, is believed to be responsible for the high demand being experienced now in the country.


The demand for plantain within the country is high, with supply struggling to meet demand. This has hampered the status of this crop as a foreign exchange earner. It n remains an important staple food, as well as the raw material for many products. It also serves as a source of revenue for many people and as raw material for industries producing value-added products in many parts of Nigeria. Plantain occupies a strategic role in rapid food production, being a perennial ratoon crop with a short gestation period. The crop ranked third among starchy staples after cassava (Mahihot escultenta) and yam (Dioscorea spp.). It is a major source of carbohydrate for more than 50 million people. In
Nigeria, all stages of the fruit (from immature to overripe) are used as a source of food in one form or the other. The immature fruits are peeled, sliced, dried and made into powder and consumed as ‘plantain fufu’. The mature fruits (ripe or unripe) are consumed boiled, steamed, baked, pounded, roasted, or sliced and fried into chips. Overripe plantains are processed into beer or spiced with chili pepper, fried with palm oil and served as snacks (‘dodo-ikire’)
Plantain is a very lucrative business, a bunch of plantain cost N1, 400 some could be sold for higher price can be sold to market women directly. Now imagine how much N1, 400 multiplied by 1,000 plantain that is a whooping sum of N1, 400, 000 but don’t forget, there were expenditures like renting of land, cleaning bushing payment of security. See manual for expenditures
Plantain chips production is one the easiest business you can start in Nigeria if you want to generate quick cash right at home. The reasons why plantain production business is easy to setup is because plantain chips is a snacks widely eaten by all, the start up capital requirement is low, you don’t need to rent a shop and plantain is readily available in the country especially in the south/middle belt regions of Nigeria

Are you planning to start a plantain farming Business, and then our guide can help you learn the basics of starting of

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Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 9:01pm On Aug 09, 2014
What kind of soil must a farmer plant plantain to get good yields?
The farmer needs soil that retains water because plantains need water, that’s why banana plantations here are irrigated. Local farmers may not have the means to carry out irrigation so they should look for soils that retain water, have a good humus layer and they should always improvise by incorporating animal manure to the soil to improve on the humus and texture of the soil to retain water.


Farmers complain that after a few harvests, plantains don’t do well, what’s the problem?
This is caused by nematodes and borers’ attacks which make plantains to dry off; all of these are soil pests. So, to control these pests a farmer needs to apply enamaticide twice a year. They can use MOCAP bastion and it will be good to have a permanent calendar. It is good to apply in April and again in September. If this is well followed, you will stop this effect. You know that the nematodes and borers attack plantains more, not bananas. That’s why banana stems which were cultivated by our parents long in the 50s are still surviving.

Can somebody make plantain or banana farming a business in Nigeria?
Sure! Plantain/bananas growing is a big business in Nigeria. The first thing is that if you are going for mass production, you should look for a market. Here in Nigeria, we have a ready market; we have the mile12 market which is one of the biggest markets in the sub region because buyers come from lagos etc to buy plantains and other food stuff. Because of this the demand for plantain seedlings is very high since people have realized that it is a big business and are ready to open big plantations. The main problem here is the suckers, so even if you go only into the multiplication of plantain and bananas seedlings, you will have the market.

2 Likes

Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Righteousman: 11:02pm On Aug 09, 2014
Pls call me on 08024457662 I want to order for a sizeable number of suckers
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 6:53am On Aug 10, 2014
you can reach us on 08036320607
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 7:08am On Aug 10, 2014
8 Rule For Starting You Own Farm
You’ve dreamed of becoming a farmer, growing food not just for yourself but for your greater community. You learn to work with the soil, and are prepared for a life of physical toil, intellectual challenges, and uncertain finances. All that’s left is to trade in your suit and tie for sturdy boots and a dilapidated hat.
Congratulations. The world needs you. According to this article, there are currently more bus drivers/conductors and commercial Okada riders than farmers in Nigeria. While at first glance this might seem like an arbitrary statistic, consider this: which is more likely to happen first, a bus driver needing to eat, or a farmer needing a bus ticket? Food ranks in the upper echelon of human needs, right beside oxygen, sleep, and cuddling with your sweetheart.

The planet needs nutritious food, and that requires thoughtful, intelligent people to grow it. So if you’re genuinely considering farming as a career, tape the following 9 rules for starting a farm to your refrigerator, tack them to your barn door, or commit them to memory. After fifteen years of running my own farm, these lessons were hard won, but continue to serve me well. As you pursue your own farming dream, keep them in the forefront of your mind. Following them might not guarantee success, but they will certainly put you on the path to economic and agricultural sustainability
8 Rule for starting you own farm
Rule #1: Avoid Debt!
Farming doesn’t HAVE to be financed with borrowed money. Avoiding debt should be a primary goal for any new farmer, even if they have to start very, very small for a few years. That’s how our farm started. And clearly, I still save my kobo.
Why is this #1? Why does it have an exclamation point after it? Because—listen up—in the past twenty years, debt has tanked more farms than drought, plague, and pestilence combined. If there’s one thing our national housing crisis has reinforced, it’s how economically debilitating debt can be for the average person. Farmers aren’t immune to these challenges. Legions of great producers have abandoned their farming dreams simply because they couldn’t pay their debt when the bank came calling.
In a nutshell, debt (borrowing money, with interest) allows us to accelerate our goals, turning dreams of tomorrow into realities of today. While borrowed money might buy us a tractor, a new barn, or even the land we’ll be farming, experience, the most valuable farming asset of all, cannot be purchased.
Experience doesn’t come with a Bachelor’s Degree in Agriculture, and it certainly doesn’t come from a book. Agriculture is fraught with uncertainties, surprises, and intellectual challenges. And that’s just before lunch. Adding monthly payments to this intimidating list financially handcuffs most people right from the start.
So does this mean ‘never take on debt’? Certainly not. There are plenty of times when leveraging assets makes sense. As you gain farming experience, and create reliable cash flow in your business, these opportunities (or necessities) will become clearer. In the meantime, however, embrace this generalization: avoid debt as much as possible

Rule #2: Allow Yourself the Opportunity to Fail
Wait a minute. This was supposed to be about not failing, and now we’re saying failure’s an opportunity? Ironic, I know. Bear with me.
Our culture seems obsessed with failure, simultaneously terrified and captivated with the concept. I know people who spend their days avoiding the humiliation of failure at all costs. Some of these people fear failure so much, they never try to accomplish anything. The thought of failure paralyzes them.
If failure is a major concern to you, here’s a spoiler: in farming, you will fail. 100% chance. In fact, with apologies to Benjamin Franklin, failure on a farm is every bit as reliable as death.
But here’s what no one ever told me. It’s okay to fail. Moreover, in farming, it’s important to fail. While painful at first, failure can be an enormously useful tool. It helps us learn our personal limits of time and energy. It’s an instrumental timesaver in the long run, letting us know what works well, and what a complete boondoggle is. Failure provides us perspective for future enterprises, making us intellectually stronger, more emotionally resilient.
So, thumb your nose at that sagging bookshelf loaded with self-help books telling you you’re not a failure. Yes you are! Get out there and fail! But while you’re failing, fail well. Fail gracefully and thoughtfully. It’s the only sure way to recognize success when it finally arrives.

Rule #3: Identify Your Market Before You Start Farming
Beautiful, but these beets (and many more) were all ready to be picked at the same time. These were shared with my family, but would have also found happy homes at local farmers market.
So you want to raise goat, grow plantain, or start a Grasscutter farm business. Maybe you just want to sell snail to fast food owners. Awesome. I like rabbit meat, catfish, and snail as much as the next guy. But how are you going to find customers like me? Do I live in your neighborhood, or five hundred miles away? How much of your stuff will I buy? How will you find others like me? What will you do if I buy ALL of your stuff, and you’re sold out? What will you do if I buy NONE of your stuff, and you’ve got a barn full of it?
Before you plant that first seed, jar your first kraut, or shear your first ewe, take the time (lots and lots of time) to figure out where you’re going to sell your products, who is going to buy them, and how you’re going to do it. Once you’ve done this, create a backup plan. Then, come up with anotherbackup plan. Chances are you’re going to need them.
Small and niche producers spend an enormous amount of effort finding their customers. This is every bit as important as growing the food to begin with, because without appropriate sales channels, fresh produce will quickly languish. When all those watermelons ripen at the exact same moment, you’ll need a place to sell them—and fast. Have a solid marketing plan prepared well in advance.
Rule #4: Match the Land to Its Suited Use
We can try to force our human dreams onto the land, or we can work with what nature gives us. On our farm, free range turkeys, rabbits, and goat naturally flourish. As such, it’s no coincidence that we’re able to raise free-range chickens, sheep, cattle, and pigs on our land. While the correlations may not be identical, when we stand back for a moment and consider the landscape, there’s a nice pattern here.
Conversely, a few years back, we tried raising free-range ducks. We learned the hard way how they evinced their waterfowl instincts: In a matter of weeks, they turned or fish pond into muddy ponds. They methodically tipped over their automatic watering troughs (it’s a long story, but trust me, they did it), creating sloppy watering holes in our pastures that we dubbed ‘quack mires.’ In their own way, ducks were telling us that they belonged near water, not out on pasture. We listened. The following season, we stopped raising ducks and have been happier ever since

Rule #5: Grow Your Passion
Shovel, dirt, gumption. Check, check, and double check. What comes next?
Everyone knows that farming is hard work. So do yourself a favor: grow something that you love.? If you grow what you’re passionate about, it will help mitigate those difficult days when the sledding gets rough and things don’t go your way. It may seem like common sense, but we often find our decisions driven more by finances, tradition, or inertia than by something we trulylove. Go out on a limb, and grow water lemon if you want. Consider it your first reward. There will be more.

Rule #6: Set Reasonable Goals
Yes, yes, we all know that you were a double major, the captain of the fencing team. You’re talented, we get it. Now repeat after me:
“It’s okay if I can’t feed the entire state of Lagos, so long as I can supply my local market.
It’s okay if I don’t make ‘X’ number of Naira this year, as long as all of my bills are paid.
It’s okay if I don’t add an additional enterprise, until I get really good at the 3 other enterprises I’m already trying to master.”
Yes, you workaholics, it’s even okay to take Tuesday afternoons off to drink a few beers and read a book, especially if you work all weekend (like I do). Take care of yourself. Burnout is big in farming. You already know that the work is physically taxing, with unique emotional demands. Find your pace. Visualize a fifty-year career, and set annual, reasonable goals that will get you there. Check in with yourself frequently. And by all means, if you raise flowers for a living, be sure to “stop and smell the petunias” from time to time. Or the daffodils. Whatever…I raise pigs, cut me some slack

Rule #7: Don’t Worry About What Other People Think
There’s an old saying that goes, “The easiest way over the wall is through the door.” In this case, perhaps it’s an open gate. There’s nothing more satisfying than following our own intuition, and being true to our dreams.
In my early twenties, I found myself talking to an older farming couple at a local gathering. We both raised catfish for a living, but they sold their fish straight to corn-fed feedlots. They asked me about my farming ambitions, and I told them of my dream to sell 100% well-fed fish. The cafish would be completely smoked, and I’d direct market the fish myself. I told them our farm could provide food for several hundred families once I really got going.
Their reaction? When I had finished speaking, they turned to each other, made eye contact, and burst into uncontrollable laughter.
Ten years later, despite this withering response from my elders (they apologized for their behavior after they managed to stop laughing, bless their hearts), our farm has accomplished all of these goals and much, much more. If I had worried what my neighboring farmers thought of me, I certainly wouldn’t be sitting here now, typing this list. Believe in yourself, and just go for it.
As for that couple? Five years ago, they put a sign up at the end of their gate: “catfish for Sale.” The sign is out there at this very moment. Pardon me while I indulge in a moment of uncontrollable laughter

Rule #8: Read. Ask Questions. Share Your Knowledge.
Okay, so this is really numbers eight, nine, ten, and eleven all rolled into one. Consider it a farming Venn diagram.
Don’t like to read? Start. Read everything that hits your intellectual radar.
Shy? Get up near the teacher if you want to learn anything.
Have an ego? Better to lose it now, before Mother Nature loses it for you.
Last but not least (bonus rule!): Be generous with your knowledge, especially with people who want to learn from you.
So that’s the list. Still want to be a farmer? Congratulations again! You’re entering a world of excellent company. As Bob Evans (yes, that Bob Evans) once said, there’s no finer group of people on the planet than those who call themselves farmers. By all means, join us.
.


Are you’re thinking about starting a farm? This guide is here to help you take initial steps. We provide an overview of the topic of starting a farm and point you in the direction of free information and resources to help you get started. This guide is primarily oriented toward small farm operations.
The Quiz: Before we begin, are you wondering whether farming is the right career choice for you in the first place? Consider taking this little quiz produced by Taylor Reid, founder of beginningfarmers.org. It incorporates his experience of what it takes to be a successful farmer into a fun tool that gives you a score. While we cannot guarantee accuracy, the quiz has received a lot of positive feedback.
The Question: Lots of people write us at beginningfarmers.org excited to start a farm, asking for advice. We wish we could reply and say: “no problem, just do these things and you should be on your way.” Unfortunately, it’s not that simple! So, we’ve compiled this resource to help you make your own informed decisions.
It’s Complicated!: Starting a farm is complicated because it encompasses so much. In no particular order, farmers must consider business planning, finding land, securing financing, marketing, production knowledge, securing equipment, developing or securing infrastructure, and their vision for their farm, a product of their values, knowledge and experience.
What to Consider?
• Vision and Values: A farm is both an extension of the vision and values of the individual(s) who start(s) it, and it has to be carefully planned to make sure that it fits within that vision as well as within the particular confines of the place where it is established.
• Place Matters: Direct market farms typically aren’t well suited for the rural heartland, and rice farming is not going to be successful on the arid plains of Eastern Washington. These are extreme examples, but there are important subtleties to every market and every plot of land.
• Planning: New farms need to have a well designed business plan that takes into consideration individual infrastructure and financial needs, the viability of marketing strategies, and the farmer’s production capacity and knowledge.
• Education and Experience: Preparation, knowledge, and training are essential. But so is being able adapt quickly to the unexpected, to persevere when factors beyond one’s control conspire against you, and knowing how/when/what/where to expend time, energy, and resources.
• Managing risk: It is helpful to plan careful to manage risk through diversification, financial management, and the ability to withstand a couple of bad years.
• Start small: For most beginning farmers, we advise starting small to allow time for details to be worked out, for additional learning to occur, and to mitigate the size and scope of problems that will inevitably arise.

1 Like

Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by investnow2013: 9:42am On Aug 10, 2014
FarmBusiness: 8 Rule For Starting You Own Farm
You’ve dreamed of becoming a farmer, growing food not just for yourself but for your greater community. You learn to work with the soil, and are prepared for a life of physical toil, intellectual challenges, and uncertain finances. All that’s left is to trade in your suit and tie for sturdy boots and a dilapidated hat.
Congratulations. The world needs you. According to this article, there are currently more bus drivers/conductors and commercial Okada riders than farmers in Nigeria. While at first glance this might seem like an arbitrary statistic, consider this: which is more likely to happen first, a bus driver needing to eat, or a farmer needing a bus ticket? Food ranks in the upper echelon of human needs, right beside oxygen, sleep, and cuddling with your sweetheart.

The planet needs nutritious food, and that requires thoughtful, intelligent people to grow it. So if you’re genuinely considering farming as a career, tape the following 9 rules for starting a farm to your refrigerator, tack them to your barn door, or commit them to memory. After fifteen years of running my own farm, these lessons were hard won, but continue to serve me well. As you pursue your own farming dream, keep them in the forefront of your mind. Following them might not guarantee success, but they will certainly put you on the path to economic and agricultural sustainability
8 Rule for starting you own farm
Rule #1: Avoid Debt!
Farming doesn’t HAVE to be financed with borrowed money. Avoiding debt should be a primary goal for any new farmer, even if they have to start very, very small for a few years. That’s how our farm started. And clearly, I still save my kobo.
Why is this #1? Why does it have an exclamation point after it? Because—listen up—in the past twenty years, debt has tanked more farms than drought, plague, and pestilence combined. If there’s one thing our national housing crisis has reinforced, it’s how economically debilitating debt can be for the average person. Farmers aren’t immune to these challenges. Legions of great producers have abandoned their farming dreams simply because they couldn’t pay their debt when the bank came calling.
In a nutshell, debt (borrowing money, with interest) allows us to accelerate our goals, turning dreams of tomorrow into realities of today. While borrowed money might buy us a tractor, a new barn, or even the land we’ll be farming, experience, the most valuable farming asset of all, cannot be purchased.
Experience doesn’t come with a Bachelor’s Degree in Agriculture, and it certainly doesn’t come from a book. Agriculture is fraught with uncertainties, surprises, and intellectual challenges. And that’s just before lunch. Adding monthly payments to this intimidating list financially handcuffs most people right from the start.
So does this mean ‘never take on debt’? Certainly not. There are plenty of times when leveraging assets makes sense. As you gain farming experience, and create reliable cash flow in your business, these opportunities (or necessities) will become clearer. In the meantime, however, embrace this generalization: avoid debt as much as possible

Rule #2: Allow Yourself the Opportunity to Fail
Wait a minute. This was supposed to be about not failing, and now we’re saying failure’s an opportunity? Ironic, I know. Bear with me.
Our culture seems obsessed with failure, simultaneously terrified and captivated with the concept. I know people who spend their days avoiding the humiliation of failure at all costs. Some of these people fear failure so much, they never try to accomplish anything. The thought of failure paralyzes them.
If failure is a major concern to you, here’s a spoiler: in farming, you will fail. 100% chance. In fact, with apologies to Benjamin Franklin, failure on a farm is every bit as reliable as death.
But here’s what no one ever told me. It’s okay to fail. Moreover, in farming, it’s important to fail. While painful at first, failure can be an enormously useful tool. It helps us learn our personal limits of time and energy. It’s an instrumental timesaver in the long run, letting us know what works well, and what a complete boondoggle is. Failure provides us perspective for future enterprises, making us intellectually stronger, more emotionally resilient.
So, thumb your nose at that sagging bookshelf loaded with self-help books telling you you’re not a failure. Yes you are! Get out there and fail! But while you’re failing, fail well. Fail gracefully and thoughtfully. It’s the only sure way to recognize success when it finally arrives.

Rule #3: Identify Your Market Before You Start Farming
Beautiful, but these beets (and many more) were all ready to be picked at the same time. These were shared with my family, but would have also found happy homes at local farmers market.
So you want to raise goat, grow plantain, or start a Grasscutter farm business. Maybe you just want to sell snail to fast food owners. Awesome. I like rabbit meat, catfish, and snail as much as the next guy. But how are you going to find customers like me? Do I live in your neighborhood, or five hundred miles away? How much of your stuff will I buy? How will you find others like me? What will you do if I buy ALL of your stuff, and you’re sold out? What will you do if I buy NONE of your stuff, and you’ve got a barn full of it?
Before you plant that first seed, jar your first kraut, or shear your first ewe, take the time (lots and lots of time) to figure out where you’re going to sell your products, who is going to buy them, and how you’re going to do it. Once you’ve done this, create a backup plan. Then, come up with anotherbackup plan. Chances are you’re going to need them.
Small and niche producers spend an enormous amount of effort finding their customers. This is every bit as important as growing the food to begin with, because without appropriate sales channels, fresh produce will quickly languish. When all those watermelons ripen at the exact same moment, you’ll need a place to sell them—and fast. Have a solid marketing plan prepared well in advance.
Rule #4: Match the Land to Its Suited Use
We can try to force our human dreams onto the land, or we can work with what nature gives us. On our farm, free range turkeys, rabbits, and goat naturally flourish. As such, it’s no coincidence that we’re able to raise free-range chickens, sheep, cattle, and pigs on our land. While the correlations may not be identical, when we stand back for a moment and consider the landscape, there’s a nice pattern here.
Conversely, a few years back, we tried raising free-range ducks. We learned the hard way how they evinced their waterfowl instincts: In a matter of weeks, they turned or fish pond into muddy ponds. They methodically tipped over their automatic watering troughs (it’s a long story, but trust me, they did it), creating sloppy watering holes in our pastures that we dubbed ‘quack mires.’ In their own way, ducks were telling us that they belonged near water, not out on pasture. We listened. The following season, we stopped raising ducks and have been happier ever since

Rule #5: Grow Your Passion
Shovel, dirt, gumption. Check, check, and double check. What comes next?
Everyone knows that farming is hard work. So do yourself a favor: grow something that you love.? If you grow what you’re passionate about, it will help mitigate those difficult days when the sledding gets rough and things don’t go your way. It may seem like common sense, but we often find our decisions driven more by finances, tradition, or inertia than by something we trulylove. Go out on a limb, and grow water lemon if you want. Consider it your first reward. There will be more.

Rule #6: Set Reasonable Goals
Yes, yes, we all know that you were a double major, the captain of the fencing team. You’re talented, we get it. Now repeat after me:
“It’s okay if I can’t feed the entire state of Lagos, so long as I can supply my local market.
It’s okay if I don’t make ‘X’ number of Naira this year, as long as all of my bills are paid.
It’s okay if I don’t add an additional enterprise, until I get really good at the 3 other enterprises I’m already trying to master.”
Yes, you workaholics, it’s even okay to take Tuesday afternoons off to drink a few beers and read a book, especially if you work all weekend (like I do). Take care of yourself. Burnout is big in farming. You already know that the work is physically taxing, with unique emotional demands. Find your pace. Visualize a fifty-year career, and set annual, reasonable goals that will get you there. Check in with yourself frequently. And by all means, if you raise flowers for a living, be sure to “stop and smell the petunias” from time to time. Or the daffodils. Whatever…I raise pigs, cut me some slack

Rule #7: Don’t Worry About What Other People Think
There’s an old saying that goes, “The easiest way over the wall is through the door.” In this case, perhaps it’s an open gate. There’s nothing more satisfying than following our own intuition, and being true to our dreams.
In my early twenties, I found myself talking to an older farming couple at a local gathering. We both raised catfish for a living, but they sold their fish straight to corn-fed feedlots. They asked me about my farming ambitions, and I told them of my dream to sell 100% well-fed fish. The cafish would be completely smoked, and I’d direct market the fish myself. I told them our farm could provide food for several hundred families once I really got going.
Their reaction? When I had finished speaking, they turned to each other, made eye contact, and burst into uncontrollable laughter.
Ten years later, despite this withering response from my elders (they apologized for their behavior after they managed to stop laughing, bless their hearts), our farm has accomplished all of these goals and much, much more. If I had worried what my neighboring farmers thought of me, I certainly wouldn’t be sitting here now, typing this list. Believe in yourself, and just go for it.
As for that couple? Five years ago, they put a sign up at the end of their gate: “catfish for Sale.” The sign is out there at this very moment. Pardon me while I indulge in a moment of uncontrollable laughter

Rule #8: Read. Ask Questions. Share Your Knowledge.
Okay, so this is really numbers eight, nine, ten, and eleven all rolled into one. Consider it a farming Venn diagram.
Don’t like to read? Start. Read everything that hits your intellectual radar.
Shy? Get up near the teacher if you want to learn anything.
Have an ego? Better to lose it now, before Mother Nature loses it for you.
Last but not least (bonus rule!): Be generous with your knowledge, especially with people who want to learn from you.
So that’s the list. Still want to be a farmer? Congratulations again! You’re entering a world of excellent company. As Bob Evans (yes, that Bob Evans) once said, there’s no finer group of people on the planet than those who call themselves farmers. By all means, join us.
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Are you’re thinking about starting a farm? This guide is here to help you take initial steps. We provide an overview of the topic of starting a farm and point you in the direction of free information and resources to help you get started. This guide is primarily oriented toward small farm operations.
The Quiz: Before we begin, are you wondering whether farming is the right career choice for you in the first place? Consider taking this little quiz produced by Taylor Reid, founder of beginningfarmers.org. It incorporates his experience of what it takes to be a successful farmer into a fun tool that gives you a score. While we cannot guarantee accuracy, the quiz has received a lot of positive feedback.
The Question: Lots of people write us at beginningfarmers.org excited to start a farm, asking for advice. We wish we could reply and say: “no problem, just do these things and you should be on your way.” Unfortunately, it’s not that simple! So, we’ve compiled this resource to help you make your own informed decisions.
It’s Complicated!: Starting a farm is complicated because it encompasses so much. In no particular order, farmers must consider business planning, finding land, securing financing, marketing, production knowledge, securing equipment, developing or securing infrastructure, and their vision for their farm, a product of their values, knowledge and experience.
What to Consider?
• Vision and Values: A farm is both an extension of the vision and values of the individual(s) who start(s) it, and it has to be carefully planned to make sure that it fits within that vision as well as within the particular confines of the place where it is established.
• Place Matters: Direct market farms typically aren’t well suited for the rural heartland, and rice farming is not going to be successful on the arid plains of Eastern Washington. These are extreme examples, but there are important subtleties to every market and every plot of land.
• Planning: New farms need to have a well designed business plan that takes into consideration individual infrastructure and financial needs, the viability of marketing strategies, and the farmer’s production capacity and knowledge.
• Education and Experience: Preparation, knowledge, and training are essential. But so is being able adapt quickly to the unexpected, to persevere when factors beyond one’s control conspire against you, and knowing how/when/what/where to expend time, energy, and resources.
• Managing risk: It is helpful to plan careful to manage risk through diversification, financial management, and the ability to withstand a couple of bad years.
• Start small: For most beginning farmers, we advise starting small to allow time for details to be worked out, for additional learning to occur, and to mitigate the size and scope of problems that will inevitably arise.
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 4:22am On Aug 11, 2014
The term “value-added agriculture” gets tossed around a lot, but what does it really mean? Many farmers want to increase profitability and adding value to raw agricultural products in one way to accomplish that goal. To achieve this however, farmers need to think in new and different ways and break away from focusing all of their efforts on production. There are two ways to add value: by capturing value or creating value.

Capturing value relates to capturing some of the value that is added to a product by processing or marketing. The farmer’s share of every Naira that consumers pay for food has been shrinking over the years.

The farmer continues to get less and the rest goes to processing, distribution and marketing. These figures sound discouraging but clearly illustrate the potential opportunity to attain more value.

Farmers can capture value by entering the processing arena—turning farm products into food products adds significant value. This involves risk and requires a new skill set. Often farmers can create alliances in cooperatives or limited-liability companies that can combine resources to achieve common goals..

Direct marketing is also a way to capture value and can be done in a variety of ways on both a small or large scale. On-farm stores, farmers’ markets, mail order and Internet sales have proven to be beneficial in capturing value. Many farmers are also now achieving a bigger profit margin by direct sales to the food service industry serving restaurants, schools and hospitals.

Creating value is another strategy that involves developing products that are differentiated in some way. The product difference may be real or perceived.
The key to success is that the consumer feels there is added value to the product and is will pay for it. Creating value can be accomplished with branded products or those with special certification.




e.g Maize farmers: sell cooked or roasted corn

Now let me tell you how much that amount of corn would be bought be consumers if its boiled or roasted and sold on the streets.

1 roasted or boiled cub of corn sells for 50 Naira each on average.
Lets assume that from the 200,000 cubs per hectare, we lose 25% and are left with 150,000 per hectare
If that amount of corn were sold retail we would get 150,000 cubs x 50 Naira = 7.5 million per hectare.
Your total farm would sell for 7.5 million

Yes. 52.5 million Naira is the amount your corn would sell for on the streets by the time a simple value of Roasting or Boiling has been added to it. That is a very long way from what you will get if you choose to sell your corn at the

Your Catfish and Tilapia: Into pepper soup product (brand)eg “kola soup”
Your cassava: Into Garri product (brand) eg “Ay garri”
Your plantain: Into plantain chips product (brand) eg marvelous Chips
Etc
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by EmmaAjayi(m): 11:25pm On Aug 11, 2014
Do you have a programme whereby you train & assist people to start up a plantain plantation? What about getting suitable land for such venture without any attendant. Tenancy challenges?
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Kollybrightu(m): 11:49am On Aug 13, 2014
I have full interest in farming but the problem i am having with it is marketing. for example, planitain is sold for about 500 naira in our local market likewise maize is sold per 10 naria per one in our local market. Pls can help me with marketing of dis product
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 12:14pm On Aug 13, 2014
Creating value is another strategy that involves developing products that are differentiated in some way. The product difference may be real or perceived.
The key to success is that the consumer feels there is added value to the product and is will pay for it. Creating value can be accomplished with branded products or those with special certification

Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 6:11pm On Aug 13, 2014
We plant plantain sucker
– Site selection, where to plant?
– Selecting the best varieties and seedlings
– Field design
– Layout of design in the field

• If you are planting a larger number of suckers then it makes sense to think carefully and plan the layout of the new field.

• To do so you have to take into account: planting density, number of trees, shade trees, slope of the field and windbreaks.

• Planting density refers to the number of trees you plant in a given area.

• The planting density is influenced by:
– Size of the mature suckers (larger trees means lower planting density)
– Amount of maintenance you intend to do (higher planting density means higher maintenance, more pruning in particular)
– The soil fertility and if fertiliser will be applied every year (no fertiliser means higher planting density as trees will stay smaller)
Generally, the Plantain requires 10 to 12 months from planting to harvest.


Farm Business setup can help you plant your sucker @ affordable rate
Call Yemi 08036320607
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by abbccc(m): 4:50pm On Aug 14, 2014
FarmBusiness: We plant plantain sucker
– Site selection, where to plant?
– Selecting the best varieties and seedlings
– Field design
– Layout of design in the field

• If you are planting a larger number of suckers then it makes sense to think carefully and plan the layout of the new field.

• To do so you have to take into account: planting density, number of trees, shade trees, slope of the field and windbreaks.

• Planting density refers to the number of trees you plant in a given area.

• The planting density is influenced by:
– Size of the mature suckers (larger trees means lower planting density)
– Amount of maintenance you intend to do (higher planting density means higher maintenance, more pruning in particular)
– The soil fertility and if fertiliser will be applied every year (no fertiliser means higher planting density as trees will stay smaller)
Generally, the Plantain requires 10 to 12 months from planting to harvest.


Farm Business setup can help you plant your sucker @ affordable rate
Call Yemi 08036320607

THANKS GREATLY FOR THE INFO...MY QUESTION IS SINCE MOST FARMS AS SUCH ARE NORMALLY FAR FROM RESIDENTIAL BUILDING, HOW CAN SOMEONE SECURE HIS PLANTATION FROM THEFT AS THAT HAS BEEN A DEMORALISING FACTORS TO ME...
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Binton: 6:50pm On Aug 14, 2014
I am interested in plantain farming but how do I get market for it?
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 8:05pm On Aug 14, 2014
abbccc:

THANKS GREATLY FOR THE INFO...MY QUESTION IS SINCE MOST FARMS AS SUCH ARE NORMALLY FAR FROM RESIDENTIAL BUILDING, HOW CAN SOMEONE SECURE HIS PLANTATION FROM THEFT AS THAT HAS BEEN A DEMORALISING FACTORS TO ME...


Burglars, thieves, vandals, poachers and other trespassers don’t think like you and me. Criminals don’t respect private property, and they believe they have some unalienable right to steal or destroy your property, kill your game, and some are willing to harm anyone that gets in their way. As the economy goes downhill and unemployment worsens, bad people become worse and desperate people become bad people!
It is difficult for an honest person to understand the complexities of a criminal’s nature and thought patterns, and this is not intended to explain those complexities. From a plantation owner/manager’s perspective, the important point to understand is that criminals have certain basic traits in common.
First, criminals are always looking for the easy prey, the trusting or defenseless victim. Secondly, they don’t want to get caught committing a crime. Third, criminals instinctively fear authority figures and, therefore, are usually deterred from areas regularly patrolled by uniformed, armed officers in marked patrol vehicles. Finally, most criminals can be deterred from plantations that practice certain security measures that provide psychological and physical defenses that make them a formidable "crime hardened" opponent that is not "easy prey"!
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 8:36pm On Aug 14, 2014
An effective plan should consider security of property as well as biosecurity issues. This list is not exhaustive; it should serve as a starting place for you to develop your own farm security plan.
Property Security
___ Effective gates and locks are in place and used wherever possible and monitored frequently
___ Keys are tagged, coded and kept in a secure area
___ Keys are never left in vehicles or equipment; vehicles are locked when not in use
___ Copies of keys are minimal and must be signed out
___ Locks are changed and keys recovered when employees are fired or leave
___ Watchdogs, motion detection lights or other electronic monitoring devices are placed in strategic locations
___ An emergency contact list is next to each phone and numbers are pre-programmed into cell phones. Numbers include fire, police, ambulance and veterinarian
___ An up-to-date farm map has been created that lists the contents at each location and highlights the location of objects of interest (chemicals, fertilizer, fuel, vehicles, livestock, etc.)
___ All chemicals are stored in a locked and weatherproof building and as recommended by the manufacturer’s label instructions
___ Adequate lighting is in place to permit work and deter theft or other crimes
___ Woodpiles, debris piles, brush and other potential hiding places are not located near buildings
___ Routine checks are conducted on cropland to monitor for evidence of unusual disease or damage
___ Adequate insurance coverage has been purchased to cover theft, chemical spills, damage from vandalism, terrorist attacks or other coverage as recommended by a farm insurance agent
___ Vulnerable areas have been identified and deficiencies corrected

Biosecurity
___ All animals are identified
___ All animals are inventoried frequently
___ Animals are monitored frequently for signs of illness or harm
___ Complete and accurate animal health records are maintained
___ Effective nutrition, vaccination and parasite control programs are in place
___ Additions to the herd are quarantined for at least 30 days before introduced to the herd
___ Sick animals are housed in an isolation area away from other animals. They are fed and treated after healthy animal chores are completed. Clothes and footwear are changed and disinfected after dealing with sick animals
___ Entry of personnel, including visitors, is controlled
___ Visitors must sign in and provide their address. International visitors may have restricted access to certain areas of the farm for disease control purposes.
___ Coveralls, plastic boot covers and/or boots are provided for approved visitors
___ Disinfectant is available and used on boots, tires and equipment
___ If equipment must be borrowed from neighbors, it is disinfected before and after use
___ Feed is stored well away from sources of contamination such as fuel, chemicals, etc.
___ Feed is protected from contamination by cat, bird and vermin feces
___ No mammalian-origin protein is fed to ruminants
___ All feed records are kept for at least five years
___ Fences and barns are well maintained
___ No fences are shared with neighbors
___ Separate equipment is used for feed and waste handling
___ Dead animals are necropsied then disposed of properly
___ Watering areas are not located close to roads or other areas with easy access by passersby
___ Crops and cropland is protected through controlled access, excellent fencing and frequent monitoring

Personnel
___ Reference and background checks are performed on new employees
___ Up-to-date first aid kits and water flush bottles are located in numerous places on the property and everyone knows their location
___ Several people on the farm have first aid/CPR training
___ Common contacts’ names and contact information is complete, up-to-date and located so that others could find it in the event of the manager’s absence
___ Employees have appropriate pesticide handlers’ training and certificate
___ Employees and family members know how to monitor for security issues and what to do in the event of a security breach

Other Security Issues
___ Farm records are complete and accurate
___ Farm computers have up-to-date and effective anti-virus software
___ Property and equipment is monitored continually and suspicious activity is reported to law enforcement immediately
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 9:11pm On Aug 18, 2014
At 200 million population in 10 years’ time, assuming that every Nigerian eats N100 worth of food every day - and that’s very small - we’ll be eating N20 billion food per day. A fairly decent eating account should be N500 per day. That will be N2 trillion worth of food a day for all Nigerians. Some people have to produce the food and we can’t continue to believe there will continue to be oil money to satisfy that demand.
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 8:22am On Aug 19, 2014
The agric business is not as cheap as government and others make it look on television. We over-romanticise agriculture as a cheap business. No. Real agric business costs money, demands patience and demands massive support by government. In any country where it has succeeded, government has had to back it heavily. We are not seeing that here.

if you have a farm manager who is lazy, sloppy, shoddy or dishonest, you can’t succeed.

Most of the older generation doing agric now may realise they have lost too much money and withdraw, for three reasons - management, capital and the quality of seeds, which is very low in Nigeria. The worst of the reasons is the quality of management. Most of the big-time farmers go to Israel or India to bring experts, but the arrangement never lasts. These people can’t understand this society. But I don’t see why we can’t train young Nigerians to be our own farm experts. A farm manager can come as expensive as a bank manager, and under him, a farm venture can never fail if he knows his onions.

Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 3:15pm On Aug 22, 2014
With the potential for industrial processing of plantain,
which has recently been adopted, and the increased interest in production by small
and large scale farms in the country, it is believed that Nigeria will continue to be
one of the world’s largest producers of plantain.
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Lesgupnigeria(m): 4:35pm On Aug 23, 2014
Well.done @Farm.business
Nice write-up
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by ihedioramma: 10:10pm On Aug 23, 2014
FarmBusiness: you can reach us on 08036320607
OK HOW MUCH?
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 6:11am On Aug 25, 2014
ihedioramma: OK HOW MUCH?

N90 per sucker

fruit is ready to harvest at about 9-11 months of age
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Vera2cc: 2:03pm On Aug 25, 2014
hi, your thread is highly educative. The land I bought is on a slope. Can I plant Plantain on it? Where are you located? Godbless
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by ihedioramma: 10:32pm On Aug 25, 2014
FarmBusiness:

N90 per sucker

fruit is ready to harvest at about 9-11 months of age
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by hayor2014(m): 3:17am On Aug 26, 2014
Do you provide some kind of training, and where is your farm located, I would appreciate an on-site experience / learning, I am on vacation and would like to not waste the work free days
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by EmmaAjayi(m): 4:37am On Aug 27, 2014
Will need your service when l acquire the land for plantain plantation. The question here is that “Do you think plantain can flourish on Ogbomoso lands”?
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Kollybrightu(m): 8:51am On Aug 27, 2014
[quote author=ihedioramma][/quote]. What is the required spacing between d plantains.
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by Lesgupnigeria(m): 5:14pm On Aug 27, 2014
Vera2cc: hi, your thread is highly educative. The land I bought is on a slope. Can I plant Plantain on it? Where are you located? Godbless
Pls don't try to,you might not make enough profit
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 9:40pm On Aug 27, 2014
hayor2014: Do you provide some kind of training, and where is your farm located, I would appreciate an on-site experience / learning, I am on vacation and would like to not waste the work free days

call 08036320607
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by FarmBusiness(m): 9:43pm On Aug 27, 2014
The application of 20 t/ha poultry manure (on a soil that is averagely fertile) within the first two months of transplanting or planting suckers might represent the optimum period for nutrient release and availability for the root uptake, which consequently will produce heavier bunches and their components as well as increase the fruit quality.

Proper application of poultry litter requires a nutrient management plan. A nutrient management plan is essentially a collection of best management practices that assures the appropriate use of animal manures and commercial fertilizers to provide crop nutrient requirements while simultaneously protecting surface and ground waters from over-application. In addition, crop production cost can be significantly reduced by effective use of this poultry farm product. Poultry litter has a calculated value of N 5,000 to N 7,000 per ton as a replacement for commercial fertilizers, depending on the individual farm circumstances and the equi-valent cost for commercial fertilizer nutrients.The importance of selecting an appropriate site for manure applications cannot be overemphasized. Consideration of potential effects on the environment and neighbor relations when applying poultry manure can be very important to the success of any manure utilization program. Attention to details prior to spreading can potentially reduce problems in these areas and minimize adverse public relations. Some suggested practices for site selection are:

-Do not apply poultry litter to land that is too steep. Ideally, slopes of land should not be more than 10 to 15 percent.
Use sites as far away from surface waters as possible. When spreading in close proximity to surface waters, drainage ditches or wetlands, use either a 100-foot setback or a 35-foot vegetative buffer. Applications from wells must be maintained at a minimum of 100 feet.
-Use the P-Index to determine if your farm represents a high risk site for phosphorous runoff. For farms representing a high risk situation, use management practices that reduce this risk.
-Use sites that are as isolated as possible. The farther away from neighbors and public facilities the better. Out of sight often means out of mind.
-Pay attention to weather forecasts before spreading. Avoid spreading prior to heavy rains. Be aware of prevailing wind conditions and avoid spreading when it might have an impact on neighbors.
-Apply poultry litter when crops can best use the nutrients.
Re: Plantain Suckers With Rapid Growth, Early Fruiting, And High Yield Potential by ihedioramma: 9:50pm On Aug 27, 2014
Kollybrightu: . What is the required spacing between d plantains.
??

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