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My Body Discharges Electricity - Health - Nairaland

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My Body Discharges Electricity by Seye(m): 5:54pm On Sep 04, 2006
I am confused and I need help quickly. I work a lot on Computer. But these days when i try to touch any object i feel some discharge of current on my hands. Everyone is now scare to touch me. Doctors in the house, please help. What do I do. Am I at risk or is it normal?.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Seun(m): 5:59pm On Sep 04, 2006
You have mutant super powers!!
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Seye(m): 6:02pm On Sep 04, 2006
Seun, this is not funny o. I am serious about it. I need help.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Remmzy(m): 6:17pm On Sep 04, 2006
Seun:

You have mutant super powers!!

maybe its the shortage of blood flow grin
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Seye(m): 6:26pm On Sep 04, 2006
Really, are you serious.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Remmzy(m): 6:31pm On Sep 04, 2006
Seye:

Really, are you serious.

sure! some times is like dat & yu feel electrified wen yu touch tins or people undecided
Or yu go see a doc cool
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by woleprof(m): 6:32pm On Sep 04, 2006
It maybe a hidden power manifesting ooo. Just keep on observing the changes
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Seun(m): 6:36pm On Sep 04, 2006
Why not discharge yourself completely before touching people?
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by doubletree(f): 11:30pm On Sep 04, 2006
could just be static electricity.happens a lot when my hands are dry freezing in the lovely wintry months and i touch a buzzer or lift/elevator
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by bluenubian(f): 12:00am On Sep 05, 2006
yes its static electricity

the kind of upholstery in ur home might be the cause, some fabric build up static electricity quick. so like seun said u need to dicharge yourself before touching people, wierd but it makes sense, if u feel like u are static, touch some metal before touching anything else.

and as for ur home, always use fabric softeners on ur cloths and Vinegar also help, clean ur couches and carpet with vinegar to reduce static elec.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by casper(m): 4:19am On Sep 05, 2006
it is just your kind of shoe that is causing it, it is the shoe you wear, it happens to me too when i wear a kind of shoe especially during winter.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by bluenubian(f): 7:51am On Sep 05, 2006
casper:

don't mind thme all ,


okay Mr. I too know
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Seye(m): 8:24am On Sep 05, 2006
bluenubian:

yes its static electricity

the kind of upholstery in your home might be the cause, some fabric build up static electricity quick. so like seun said u need to dicharge yourself before touching people, wierd but it makes sense, if u feel like u are static, touch some metal before touching anything else.

and as for your home, always use fabric softeners on your cloths and Vinegar also help, clean your couches and carpet with vinegar to reduce static elec.
So its normal. but for how long will this last?. I've been experiencing this for close to three months now. Even to touch metal this day is a serious thing o. To close door na wahala, to touch the monitor screen the same. Do I need to see a doctor really?
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Remmzy(m): 8:49am On Sep 05, 2006
casper:

don't mind thme all ,

it is just your kind of shoe that is causing it, it is the shoe you wear, it happens to me too when i wear a kind of shoe especially during winter.

Ore! shocked na summer we dey, abi? tongue winter ke? grin
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by mamaput(f): 9:10am On Sep 05, 2006
I also think it has to dowith the cloths you wear sometimes.
.
There are some
wooly
things i wear even as am brushing my hair it stands .
.
God i hate that thing.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by whitelexi(m): 12:46pm On Sep 05, 2006
Dude! u need help, dont wait for the worst to happen, Go to your GP or go to God Fast! grin
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by slimsikiru(m): 12:52pm On Sep 05, 2006
[color=#990000][/color] we the xmen wellcome you to our midst you are now a mutant.
i shall name you electroman
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by tunamania(m): 1:19pm On Sep 05, 2006
men to test that,touch water and tell me how it feels then i'll send what u can do doctorin the house
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by markesh(m): 1:31pm On Sep 05, 2006
If you work with computers in an environment where there is an airconditioner, the air coming from the air conditioner will dry the air. Because your hands are dry, constantly rubbing your fingers on the keyboard is going to cause static electric charges to build up in your fingers, and probably because your shoes as well as the chair you are sitting on are isolated, your entire body will charge. Because of the dry air around you, your body cannot discharge into the air, and will act like a molecular battery. When you touch a person after an entire day of sitting at the PC, your body will discharge into them, causing the electric shock.

To solve the problem, get a small bowl of water, and regularly dip your fingers into it. You will discharge the static electricity. Alternative, make sure that you are not isolated from the ground (through rubber carpet, rubber shoes, etc), and you will never build up the charge in the first place.

Lastly, because the air in nigeria is very humid, staying outside for a bit will lead to the static electricity discharging into the air.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by kitaun(m): 3:45pm On Sep 05, 2006
Go visit T.B Joshua shocked grin
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by Eurphoria(f): 3:52pm On Sep 05, 2006
@Poster

Hello!grrrrrrrrr tongue
It may not be so bad to have this so called electricity discharge you seem to talk about, hello? sorry can i be cheeky and ask if you have electricity on your tongue too?(if u know what i mean tongue) lipsrsealed Geez do you know what you can do with that? third question do you have a girlfirend? Boy start making use of ur electric current wink
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by kinzolic(m): 3:56pm On Sep 05, 2006
r u serious ol boy tell me hw i fit be like u
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by vokalguy(m): 3:57pm On Sep 05, 2006
its static electricity, had it b4 and it was kinda cool, i mean it shocks but not 2 d point of panic, it would go
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by kinzolic(m): 4:06pm On Sep 05, 2006
But is it really possible?
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by woleprof(m): 4:28pm On Sep 05, 2006
At last we have a mutant in Nigeria.

HURRAY, WELCOME BOY. grin grin grin
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by markesh(m): 4:29pm On Sep 05, 2006
And this is even a useful mutant! Just plug him into one transformer like that, nepa will never take the light again.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by nico(m): 4:31pm On Sep 05, 2006
It happens to me too.
It only happens when I'm really scared, shocked( like when I'm travelling by Plane )
I can't touch plastics or metals during this period
My Doctor says, because I'm a kid my body is over-producing too much natural steriods
He says it will go away as I get older.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by woleprof(m): 4:42pm On Sep 05, 2006
Another mutant, but not in Nija angry
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by ThoniaSlim(f): 4:54pm On Sep 05, 2006
oh oh, grin, grin.
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by smilingjee: 5:05pm On Sep 05, 2006
Why do we experience static shocks?
Many people ask about shocks experienced when they touch the door, filing cabinet, lift, or other metal object.

Static electricity is generated whenever two materials are in contact with each other. All materials are made of electrical charges in the material atoms. In the universe there are equal amounts of negative electrical charge (electrons) and positive charge (protons). These generally try to stay in balance of equal amounts at every location.

However, when two materials are in contact, some of the charges redistribute by moving from one material to the other. This leaves an excess of positive charge on one material, and an equal negative charge on the other. When the materials move apart, each takes it's charge with it. One material becomes charged positively, and the other negatively.

If the materials are able to conduct electricity away the charges will dissipate and eventually recombine. In this case, static electricity effects may be too small to be noticed. However, if the charges are separated faster than the material can dissipate them, the amount of electrostatic charge builds up. Eventually a high voltage, and the effects of static electricity, may be noticed.
If you experience static shocks while working in an area where flammable atmospheres (solvent vapours or dust clouds) might be present, seek advice immediately. There may be a fire or explosion risk.



Read more about
why static charges build up on people

Man-made floor and shoe sole materials have been main factors in most cases of shocks we have investigated.

If you just changed your floor, and you're now getting shocks, it could be the floor covering is the main cause.
Why do I get shocks when I touch the door knob or filing cabinet?
Most modern shoes have highly insulating rubber or plastic soles. As you walk, static charges can build up on the soles of the shoes. This is especially true if the floor is also insulating. Some older nylon carpets are particularly good at generating static electricity.

The charge on the shoes soles induces static electrical charge on your body, and this charge appears as a high voltage. Under severe conditions, more than 15,000 Volts have been recorded. It is quite common to experience 5,000V. In fact, many people do not feel a shock from a static electricity discharge less than about 2,000-4,000V.

If you are indoors, the point can be proved by walking around for a while with no shoes on - you will probably not experience shock.

I get shocks when I'm sitting, or get up from the chair - and I haven't walked anywhere!
When you sit in a chair the contact between your clothes and the chair can generate a lot of electrostatic charge on your clothes. While you stay in contact with the chair your body voltage stays low. If you lean forward so you back moves away from the chair back, or if you get up out of the chair, then you take the electrostatic charge with you. Your body voltage can rise very rapidly to a high voltage as the charge is separated from it's counter charge on the chair.
Furniture coverings can also be a major factor!

Tip - cotton is usually a low static material.

Shoe sole materials and outer clothing can be part of the problem.

Tip - cotton clothes are comfortable and usually give no static problems.

Tip - try different shoes to see if some give less problems. Leather soles are often good.


Why do I experience shocks, when my colleagues do not?
There are many reasons why this might happen. Firstly, some people are more sensitive to shocks than others. For most people, the threshold for feeling shocks is in the range 2,000-4,000V.

Secondly, you may be storing more static electricity than others. This depends on the size of your body and feet, and the thickness of your shoe soles! A bigger body, bigger feet, and thinner shoe soles, means more charge has to be stored to produce the same voltage. This gives a higher energy electrostatic discharge.

Thirdly, you may be generating more charge than others. This may be due to the material of your shoe soles, or the way that you walk. If it happens when sitting, it may be due to the material of your clothes, and the amount of static they generate against your chair.

Does the weather affect static electricity?
Static charge build-up is enhanced when the air is dry. So, static problems and effects are often noticed in dry air conditions. The air outside can be very dry when the weather is cold and dry. Indoors, central heating or air conditioning can give very dry conditions which promote static electricity. Heating warms the air and reduces its humidity.

Static shocks are often noticed in cold dry weather, especially when in a centrally heated environment, and may disappear when the weather gets more humid. Static shocks may also be encouraged under air conditioning in hot weather.
You'll often find shocks are worst in the winter when the air outside is cold and dry. They may disappear in warmer damper weather.

If possible, keep air humidity above 30% r.h.

Tip - if the air in your room is very dry you could try keeping an open wide dish of water handy - this will evaporate and moisten the air nearby.
How can I stop static shocks?
Unfortunately cure is not always easy. Indoors, you can try raising the air humidity to 40-50% rh with a humidifier. (You can check the humidity with a cheap humidity meter from a gardening shop.) Also, look for shoes with leather soles. In the electronics industry, and in areas where electrostatic sparks could cause a fire hazard, people often wear specially designed static dissipative shoes to reduce electrostatic charge build-up on the body. It is less likely that problems will be experienced with non-polymer floors, such as cement or wood (although varnishes can cause problems). However, replacing the floor can be expensive!

It is possible to treat some floors with static dissipative treatments - but the benefit of this will probably wear off after a while.

I get shocks when I'm shopping - how can I stop this?
Once again, you build up electrostatic charge as you walk around. However, if you're pushing a trolley, the wheels of the trolley can also generate static electricity. As you walk around, you and the trolley both store charge and reach a high voltage. When you reach to touch something, you get a shock.

These effects are made worse by the warm dry air in many shopping areas, and the floor coverings which are used. Even if they were treated against static electricity when installed, this treatment may have work off.

As before, if you wear leather soled shoes while you shop, this may help. Otherwise, you could try holding a key and touching some metal rack with it, to discharge the static electricity painlessly before you touch things by hand.

Sadly, the cure is probably in the hands of the shop facility managers, who may need to maintain or replace the floor covering or trolleys. Usually they don't discover the problem until after the floor is fitted, and it's difficult and expensive to do anything about it.


If you're a plant lover, keep plants in the room in gravel filled dishes - and keep them regularly watered!

Static shocks can be a nuisance - but are not generally a health risk.


Are static shocks a health risk?
Fortunately there is little risk attached to such electrostatic discharges. In most cases they are just a common nuisance. The biggest risk is that a shock could cause you to have an accidental injury. For example, you might withdraw your arm suddenly and hit it against something.

What about shocks when I get out of my car?
Many people experience shocks when they get out of their car. Often they believe that the car is charged - but this is not normally so.

Sitting in the car, electrostatic charges are generated on the car seat and the person's body, due to contact and movement between the clothes and the seat. When the person leaves the seat, They take half of this charge with them. As they get out of the vehicle, their body voltages rises due to this charge - a voltage of 10,000 Volts is not unusual.

When they reach to touch the vehicle door, the electrostatic discharge and shock occurs as their hand approaches the metal door.

The voltage build-up can often be avoided by holding onto a metal part of the door frame as you leave the seat. This provides a return dissipation path for the charge on your body.

If you have forgotten to hold the metal door part as you leave the seat, a shock may often still be avoided by touching the glass window before you touch the metal door. The glass may be conductive enough to dissipate charge, whilst preventing the rapid discharge which is felt as a shock.

If you have your keys in your hand - let the spark discharge through the keys not to your fingers, and you won't feel anything!
To avoid shocks when getting out of the car -

HOLD the metal door frame before you get out

KEEP HOLDING as you get out, until you are fully out of the car.

It's easy with practice
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by smilingjee: 5:09pm On Sep 05, 2006
Re: My Body Discharges Electricity by smilingjee: 5:11pm On Sep 05, 2006
other tips includes:

How do I help prevent the build up of static electricity on my person, in order to reduce the risk of transferring it to my computer components?
The best way to prevent the build up of static on you is to ground yourself. You can do this by touching a grounded metal object such as you computer's metal case, or, personally I use that and my metal radiator wink. The easiest way is to wear an anti- static wristband, which you tie around your wrist and clip it to your metal computer case, and it keeps you grounded constantly, so that any static that you charge up becomes immediately grounded.
You can also help prevent static in the following ways:

Don't wear woolly or nylon clothing.
Do not wear socks
Do not stand on a carpet while working inside your computer
Make sure you havn't been moving around a lot before working inside your computer, and make sure you havn't been rubbing your clothes against you
Ground yourself before working inside your computer by wearing an anti-static wristband or touching a grounded metal object
Whilst working inside your computer, try to keep one part of your body touching the case at all times, such as a hand or an arm etc. With an anti-static wristband, the wristband does this for you, so you don't have to worry about that
Protect your components with anti-static bags when they are not inside your computer.
Take care not to touch any metal object or circuitry or chips on your components such as the motherboard and processor pins
Handle your components by the edges where there isn't any circuitry present
You could try controlling the humidity of the room by keeping it between 35 and 50%. This will help prevent the buildup of static.
Keep your clothes away from components
It also helps to keep your PC plugged into a anti-surge expansion plug which is plugged into the wall socket while you are working on it (this step isn't recommended), but REMEMBER TO ALWAYS KEEP THE POWER SWITCHED OFF WHEN WORKING INSIDE YOUR COMPUTER

I hope this page has been helpful to you. Taking all the steps is not necessary, however I highly recommend grounding yourself before working inside your computer, and keeping yourself grounded at all times. Also, never touch the bare circuitry of your components, and always handle by the edges. Protect components outside of your computer by placing them in anti-static bags. I always remove my shirt and socks when working on my computer, and I make sure I am not standing on any carpet. Pay attention to the dress tips above! Clothes are the main reason you become charged with static.
Have fun working in a static-reduced environment!

PICS will be added as soon as I get my digital camera up and running. I have some nice pics of static electricity in action planned for you, you'll see! Last night I stayed up till about 1:30 am experimenting with a static globe and I was able to get it to burn through paper. Pics coming soon hopefully wink
p.s. I also burned and shocked myself quite a lot in the process lol!

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