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Origin Of Various Igbo Clans - Culture - Nairaland

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The Origin Of Oduduwa As It Relates To The Yorubas: Seperating Myths From Facts / Database Of Audio/video Recordings Of Various Igbo Dialects / The Origin Of The Igbo (1) (2) (3) (4)

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Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 9:38pm On Nov 10, 2010
As a result of several instances of ignorance shown by some Igbos as regards to Igbos outside their immediate clan,I decided to research on the tradition of origin of many Igbos as believed by the different parts of Igboland.I believe that Igbos both at home and diaspora need to have knowledge of Igbos generally.

Nri-Awka,Isu,Oru and Aro form a very important factor in Igbo evolution.



THE NRI KINGDOM

by
Eze Nri, Nri Enwelana II, Obidiegwu Onyeso

Main article:

ORIGIN:

NRI KINGDOM is the oldest Kingdom in Nigeria. It was founded around 900AD by the progenitor, Eri, the son of Gad. According to biblical accounts, Jacob had Leah as his wife who begot four sons for him. When  Leah noticed she had passed child-bearing age, she gave her maid – servant, Zilpah to Jacob to wife, and through Zilpah he had a son named Gad. Gad then bigot Eri, who later formed a clan known as Erites vide Genesis Chapter 30 verse 9; 46 verse 16 and Numbers chapter 26 verses 15-19. Eri was therefore amongst  the twelve tribes of Israel via Gad.

During their stay in Egypt Eri became the high priest and spiritual adviser to Pharaoh Teti, the fifth dynastic king of Egypt around 2400 BC.

During the Exodus, which marked the beginning of the mass movement of the tribes of Israel, the tribe of Eri was amongst the tribe that left Egypt following the injunction from God to the Israelites (see Deuteronomy chapter 28 verses 58 – 68). Some of these tribes founded settlements in the southern part of Sudan, where they established the “Nok” culture, which is similar to that of other (sun Cult) culture, like Nri, Fiji, Samoa, and Jukun in the Northern part of Nigeria and elsewhere. But others who could not remain in the Southern Sudan traveled further South, some branched off to Jukun, in Northern part of Nigeria, others continued and arrived at the confluence of Rivers Niger and Anambara known as “Ezu-na-Ọmambala” and settled there while some veered off to the Island of Fiji in the South Pacific Ocean. An intelligence report notes that the Fijians have the same sun culture with the people of Nri.

When Eri arrived at the confluence of “Ezu-na-Ọmambala” he had two wives, namely Nneamakụ and Oboli, Nneamakụ begot five children, namely (a) Nrifikwuanịm-Menri being the first son (b) Agụlụ (c) Ogbodudu (d) Onogu and (e) Iguedo the only daughter. Oboli begot Ọnọja, the only son who founded the Ịgala Kingdom in Kogi State. Meanwhile, Nri-Ifikwuanịm begot Agụkwu Nri, Enugwu-Ukwu, Enugwu-Agidi, Nọfịa, and Amọbia, while his brother Ogbodudu who later became Nrinaoke N’Ogbodudu had founded the Diodo Dynasty, while his brother Ezikannebo founded Akamkpịsị and Amanuke. Onogu Begot Ịgbariam, while Iguedo, the only daughter, begot Ogbunike, Ọkuzu, Nando, Ụmụleri, and Nteje, Known today as Ụmụ-Iguedo clan, while the former are better known as Ụmụ-Nri clan. According to Nri Oral tradition recently substantiated by archaeological findings of Ọraeri/Igbo-Ukwu objects, the unification of Agukwu, Diodo, and Akamkpịsị was enacted constitutionally during the beginning of reign of Nribụife (AD 1159 – 1252) who was the first Eze Nri to observe the Ịgụ-Arọ Festival as a pan – Igbo affair in 1160AD (Prof. M.A. Ọnwụejeọgwu 2003).

Nri-Ifikwuanịm took after his progenitor Eri, and became a high priest among his people. He left Agụleri in search of a better living place, according to Mr. M.D.W. Jeffreys report, and settled at present Nri site. He started performing what Eri did at Egypt, cleansing of abominations, giving titles such as prestigious Ọzọ title, to his people, proclaiming the New Year (Ịgụ-Arọ) etc.

ỊGỤ-ARỌ: Ịgụ-Arọ is an annual festival of the Nri people. It is during this festival that Eze Nri proclaims the New Year to all the Igbo communities under his jurisdiction, and he then announces the Nri calendar to the people. The Nri calendar is made up of thirteen (13) Lunar months .
What many historians seem to skip is the influence of Nri on Benin's Igu'Oba.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 9:53pm On Nov 10, 2010
Afikpo

Origin of Afikpo (Ehugbo)

The geographical entity known as Ehugbo (Afikpo) is situated in the southern part of Ebonyi State, Nigeria. It is bounded to the north by the town of Akpoha in Amoha Local Government Area, to the south by Unwana and Edda in Ubeyi and Afikpo South Local Government Areas respectively, to the East by the Cross River and to the West by Amasiri in Amaoha Local Government Area. Afikpo spans an area approximately 164 square kilometers in size.


The first settlers in Afikpo, according to oral tradition, were the Egu and Nkalu. Let’s take them one after the other.

The Egu

It is officially known that the first human settlement in Afikpo dated from 5000 – 3000 BC (Later Stone Age) – Official Radio Carbon date of the first human settlement in Afikpo). This date came from the excavation carried out at Ezi Ukwu rock shelter by Professor D.D. Hattle in 1966. Unfortunately, this information did not indicate the race that settled in Afikpo then.

However, oral tradition establishes that Egu were the first settlers in Ehugbo, followed by the Nkalu. So whateve be the case, it is now known that the Egu inhabited Afikpo a very long time ago.

The Egu were very wonderful people. Their mode of life, their skill in handicraft and their creative ingenuity in every human endeavour ranked them the most talented among their contemporaries of the time. In fact, all the intricate artistry seen in the articles they produced (such as pots, masquerade faces and decorations associated with Ogo Cult, including Isiji Cult initiation) which form part of Afikpo Culture today, were fabricated and introduced to Afikpo by the Egu. As a matter of fact, typical Afikpo culture and tradition owe their origin to the Egu.

The people of Egu were hard working. They were also fearless, daring and adventurous. Whatever they made were very durable. Their daring and adventurous nature often induced them to surmount all odds in order to attain their desired goal. This probably accounts for their successful movement towards the northern part of Ehugbo to inhabit Orie Elu, Ogbugbu Ugwuegu up to Akpu-eba, in spite of the barrier posed by natural phenomena like rocky hills and forests infested with wild creatures.

The areas formerly inhabited by the Egu are now part of present day Ugwuegu arable lands.

Traceable Features of the Egu Areas

1. Ebor Egu (Egu palm tree plantation). It is now Ugwuegu Elu Community Palm Tree Plantation.
2. Ulo Ubi Orie Elu: (former Obi Ogo or Ulo Ogo Egu). Now modern farm hut which serves as shelters for farmers.
3. Ogbugbu Umuruma (land where children were massacred). Now a farm land.
4. Nsusu Ede Egu at Akpu-eba (holes carved on a ground stone along Akpu-eba farm land road used by the Egu for playing native draft, “ede”)

Nkalu

While the Egu inhabited the northern part of Ehugbo, another formidable group called Nkalu settled at the south. As there are not available records to determine the time of their settlement, it is not possible to say much about their origin and their way of life. However, it is believed that the Nkalu migrated from Akoi, including probably Ekuri, Erei, Agwugwuna (Akunakuna), etc. on the eastern part of Cross River State. They wandered around for some time until they crossed the Cross River and settled at the basin of the Cross River around present day Ehoma Lake (near Otu Eke) hundreds of years ago. From here they spread northwards and occupied the geographical areas of the present Enohia Nkalu, Nkpoghoro and Amaozara.

Numerically, Nkalu was greater than Egu but not as ingenious. The Nkalus were skilled farmers and Spartan warriors. It is said that Nkalu brought yam to Ehugbo. It is because of the notion that Nkalu brought yam to Ehugbo and the fact that their population was greater than that of Ehugbo (Igbo people) that there is a saying in Afikpo dialect: “Ji diri Igbo diri Nkalu ma nke Nkalu karia.”

Apart from farming, the Nkalus also undertook fishing and canoe building. Although they were great warriors, the Nkalu people were hospitable and easy going. Their mode of life included merry-making, particularly at New Yam Festivals. Their boisterous celebrations often attracted the attention and excitement of their neighbours (the Egu) who settled north-wards at the present Ugwuegu. There appeared to be mutual interaction between the two peoples that made it possible for the Nkalu to imbibe the Ogo Culture of “Isubu” initiation of Egu people. This was the state of affairs before the emergence of what we know geographically as Afikpo
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 10:03pm On Nov 10, 2010
Igbo Etiti


One of the engaging topics in the book is the gallant attempt made by contributors to trace the origin of the various communities in Igbo-Etiti: Ikolo, Onyohor and Ukehe trace their origin from communities in present Udi area. Onyohor and Ikolo are said to be descended from Ugwunye and therefore blood relations of Affa, Egede and Nike, while Ukehe is one of the seven children of Ojebe Ogene (Ebe, Abor, Ukana, Awhum, Okpatu, Umulumgbe and Ukehe). Udueme claims Igalla paternity while Aku and Ekwegbe claim to be a mixed race of Igbo and Igalla.  A majority of Aku are said to be of Nshi (Nri in Awka) origin while some Ohemje people are said to be of Igalla.  In the case of Ekwegbe, part came from Akpugo, Ikem, Agulu (Awka) and Igalla. It is instructive that the black-smiting village in Ekwegbe answers Agulu (Eguru) while all black smiths are called Umu Eguru (Agulu).  Diogbe and Umunko claim to come from Eha-Amufu and Ikem (Isi-Uzo) respectively.  Ohodo claims to be blood relations of Obimo and Ogbodu Abba while parts of Ozala claim to come from Nkitiba Udueme. Ochima claims to be the father of all Igbo people so that Ochima is the central locus of dispersal of all Igbos.  Very interesting! Belief and acceptance of blood relationships among communities can be exploited fruitfully for political, social and economic ends. The very influential Nwodo family of Ukehe exploited the Ojebe Ogene identity to win overwhelming votes in the area during the governorship elections of 1990.
The relationship between Aku and Ekwegbe needs to be further explored.  It is claimed that Ekwegbe formed part of the Igalla descendants of Aku from where they moved to their present position through Umunna.  In fact there is a special relationship between Aku and Ekwegbe in which it is believed that all people who die in Aku pass through a special road in Ekwegbe on their way to the land of the spirits. While Ekwegbe people use the road, no Aku person has ever walked on the road.  By listening to the conversation and instructions from such dead people using the road, Ekwegbe people are able to inform and warn Aku people to observe or desist from certain behaviours or songs.  Twice in the life of the writer, Ekwegbe had sent word to Aku to stop certain popular songs and dances.  Within a few days of the recept of the news, the songs and dances were discontinued throughout the length and breadth of Aku
The Odo masquerade cult is a dominant cultural feature of Igbo Etiti area. With regard to the origin of the Odo, there is a puzzling unanimity.  All the contributors on this topic claim that Odo appeared first to a woman with a male child on her back.  If so, why are women not eligible for initiation into the cult? Another question is why the ten Odo towns represented in the book point to a woman as the first to see the Odo on its first apparition? It is worth investigating whether other Odo towns outside Igbo Etiti such as Neke, Ikem, Eha-Amufu and Ojebe Ogene Zone have the same story of origin of the cult.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 10:07pm On Nov 10, 2010
Abiriba

TRADITION OF ORIGIN AND MIGRATION OF THE ABIRIBAS:

The Abiribas are part of the Agunaguna sub-tribe of the main Ekoi group. They are part of the larger Yakurr group that can also be traced up to Ikom and other parts of the upper Cross River basin. The present Yakor (Yakurr) Local Government Area of the Cross River State includes Ugep, Agunaguna, Nko, Usukpam (Urukpam), Ubaghara and others. In these areas are such other settlements as Ebiribara, Ebom-Ebiriba et cetera. As a matter of fact, the Ebom-Ebiribas in Yakor simply changed their name to Ebom because the present Abiriba (Ebiriba) was virtually eclipsing them such that even mails meant for them found their way into Abiriba of Abia State. The Abiribas are said to have lived in that part of Enna clan where there were plenty of Uda trees (xylopia aethiopica) hence the name Ena-Uda. The shrine of the Abiriba royalty is still standing at Usukpam-Ena. From events and available data, the Abiribas were said to have crossed the river at Usukpam, hence they are often referred to as Usukpam-Etete, a nostalgic name for that ancient home. Usukpam (Urukpam) as called by the natives there now is part of Akpaa-Erei clan of the larger Ena clan. The Abiribas lived here for long when they left mainland Ena-Uda under the leadership of Nnachi-Oken, hence the nomenclature, Ebiriba Enachi-Oken. From here they travelled through Okon-Ohafia and settled at Udara-Ebuo, a stretch of land between Amekpu-Ohafia and Okagwe-Ohafia. This long sojourn in the present day Ohafia area explains the numerous relationships between this area of Ohafia and Abiriba.

Equally the Abiriba-Ena royalty have affinity with Akanu Ohafia. Nnachi Oken died at Udara Ebuo and Ntagha continued the journey to Uranta where much later he too died. After the demise of Ntagha, Igbokwu became the leader. From here, Udara-Ebuo, the Abiribas now led by Igbokwu passed by Nkwu-ebu (Nkwebi) Ohafia to Uranta near Oboro en-route OzuAbam. Nkwu-ebu is the Palmyra palm, botanically/scientifically known as Borassus aethiopum which grew abundantly here. From here they moved right (north) and found their way into Ihe and Agboha about 1700. These two communities are near the present Binyom village of Abiriba. Agboha up till today is referred to as Agboha-Igbokwu, after the leader Igbokwu. This date of arrival is well estimated from later recorded events of early European visitors and estimating backwards from the number of Abiriba Kings remembered in our history. It is interesting to note the name Binyom which sounds Ekoi and has no Igbo meaning. The Abiribas brought their gods from Ekoi, the main god being the Otisi, (Otusi, Otosi). The Otisi is the royal symbol of authority over the Abiriba people. Otisi, Otosi is Ekoi name and many other Igbo Cross Riverine communities equally have this name and as gods too. The name is common in Afikpo areas, Edda, Ohafia, Aro, Abam, Item and others. In these areas, the royal families are referred to as Ndi-Otisi, that is, the people of Otisi. It is so too in Item and some other places. It is also equally noteworthy that one of the feared juju gods is Otisi Binyom of Abiriba. Apart from this god, we have Kalu, the god of war or thunder. One of these gods is at Ozua-elu (Kalu Ozua Elu) after Amamba village on the road that takes and brings back men who have made journeys, be it war or trade on that route.

The other is at Ndi Ebe, Kalu Ndi Ebe of Umu e'Chuku Amogudu. These Kalu gods are sacrificed to with cocks and rams.The Abiribas lived for long at ihe and Agboha from where they fanned out to establish modern day Abiriba villages and city. The Abiribas developed Agboha and built up a big market here. Because of their mercantilism, blacksmithing, weaving, crafts manship in ivory et cetera, Abiriba attracted marketers from neighbouring communities that stretched all the way to Ozuitem, Ozuakoli, Ahaba-Imenyi, Item and others. When the current and new market (Afia-nkwo) was founded people still referred to the portion on the western flank of Binyom, namely Agboha, as Afiankwo-ochie that is, the old market place. After several years of sojourn at Agboha, the royal group moved to the part of Umueso village called Amelunta today. The compounds that make up Amelunta are Ndi Ekpe, the main royal compound, Ndi Ezema and Ndi e'Mbaeku. The kings that ruled Abiriba and from Ndi Ekpe, Amelunta, were Ekpe, Itu, Uduka Oko (Uduka uku) Egbara uku and others. One of the sons of the royalty, Oko Uduka, alias Okonta Ogba-enwo (Oko the monkey shooter) in later years in his hunting expeditions located the valley after Isi-Olara and thought it was a natural fortress and also attracted by the water moved the royal compound there while retaining the majority of the royalty at Ndi-Ekpe.

This new compound is known as Ndi Oko-ogo, that is, the people of the home of Oko. The new royal compound not only accommodated the royalty but other sojourners that sought refuge in Abiriba for protection by the Abiriba King. From Ndi Okogo and Ndi Ekpe, the royalty developed Ameke Echichi and the other Ameke villages. The royalty installed the first Nkwa in Mgbala Ekpe at Ameke Echichi. Nkwa is a wooden carving in a compound hall of the royalty or in the Ekpe cult hall of the royalty. Nkwa is an arm of the Otisi god. In the olden days a replica of this carving formed part of the equipment given to a princess as a wedding gift and placed in the small hall, Obu, of the compound where she is married to. There are among others recently two such compounds where replicas of the nkwa small effigies, child bearing goddesses, were given to daughters married at Ndi Okoronkwo and Umuaga compounds both of Udanta Amogudu. The whole idea of these human-looking replicas, large dolls, is that the daughter may by the grace of the goddesses produce children. Umuaga compound at the end of the civil war sought permit from Ndi EkpeAmelunta to replace this wooden replica at their Obu compound, having been destroyed by the recently ended civil war. This was granted and the accompanying traditional ceremonies and rites accomplished. The expansions of the Abiriba people from Agboha to Amelunta and the new king's fortress compound, Ndi Oko-ogo as well as the other Ameke villages were not smooth ones. In their expansions into the current city, the Abiribas encountered other settlers, Umuhu, who were at Ihebu and Amamba, Nkporo At Kirii of Umueso and part of Item were near Ogbu, each group moving towards more fertile terrains.

The Abiribas expanded to found the villages of Ameke, Amogudu, particularly Umu -e’Chukwu, and Agboji under Ebiri. In later years when parts of Amelunta needed expansion, the then Enachioken, Oko Uduka -requested Egboji, now under Nwagu Efa to provide present day Amaukughukughu, (the place of the owls) for that purpose. Because of this gesture, the king rewarded Egboji with Nkwa-Otisi and that is why the Mgbala Ekpe of Ama-Ebia of Egboji has Nkwa. Ama-Ebia is the home of the Egboji village head.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 10:16pm On Nov 10, 2010
Abagworo, maybe you might have to give some time between posts. I think Nairaland is designed to view consecutive and closely timed posts as spam, and when it thinks its spam, it'll hide it, like it has with your Abiriba post.

Other than that, I'm really enjoying this topic. This is the kind of information I've been looking for. Do you have the links/sources?
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 10:21pm On Nov 10, 2010
Ohafia

The ancestors of the Ohafia people must have had a beginning somewhere. Obviously, they must also have had some
connection with other groups that are not identified as Ohafia people. Since, Ohafia is Igbo, it goes without saying that
Ohafia has a common origin with other Igbo Ethnic groups. In their quest to finding a permanent home of abode, they
sojourned through many lands, namely Benin Empire, Ndoni, Ibeku, Bende etc. A prominent happening at their Ndoni
home (Ndoni is in present Rivers State) was the demise of their ancestral leader, Akpo Uku. This bequeathed the
responsibility of leading the Ohafia people to his son Atita Akpo Uku. From Ndoni the journey continued to Isieke Ibeku.
At Isieke Ibeku, some Ohafia persons soon resorted to acts of mischief. Deprived of the influence of their dead leader,
minor disagreement with their Ibeku and Leru neighbours easily got out of hand. The laying of sharpened knives across
footpaths for offensive rather than defensive reason became very rampant. The ringleader in this overture was a man
called ‘Ukoha". Both the Leru and the Ibeku people were getting uncomfortable living with their Ohafia neighbours
because of this mischievous propensities. During this period, there was fighting between sections of Umuahia ad Ossa
Ibeku people. He Ossa people sought refuge with the Ohafia people of Umuajiji in Isieke Ibeku. An attack was been
planed against the Ohafia people by the Ibeku people. The son-in-law of Ukoha (the trouble-maker) who was present at
the meeting of the Ibeku people revealed the conspiracy to Ukoha. Ukoha took immediate action, alerting the Ohafia
people about the planned attack against them. Although the Ohafia people beefed up security, an ominous event
occurred that ended their stay in Ibeku.
Several accounts exist as to the reason for this exodus. One account said that it was the barking of a dog caught in a
trap that frightened an Ohafia woman called Mgbo to raise an alarm. This alarm led to a stampede that evacuated Ohafia
people from Isieke Ibeku. Another version of the story was that a string of calabashes (food containers made from the
dried skin of gourds) suddenly collapsed making shattering noise. This later version seems to be more correct. This is
because the idiomatic tongue twister coined by the fleeing Ohafia made reference to the incident of the collapsed string
of calabashes
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 11:53pm On Nov 10, 2010
IKWERRE
From the foregoing it will be seen that except for the general classification of the Akpor communities as one of the seven major groups in Ikwerreland and the linguistic evidence the people stand out distinct in the present state of our knowledge of lkwerre origins and migrations. For the Obio people. however. without any specific reference to the Benin tradition it is acknowledged that Obio is one of the descendants of Iwhuruoha (Ikwerre). Some traditions mention Ochichi as the great ancestor of the people; others lack the Ochichi element. All, at any rate. regard Obio as the common ancestor of the Evo and Apara communities. Evo being the senior partner and made up of the present day Oro-Evo. Oropotoma and Oroesara. The Apara themselves whose founding father is variously named Apara or Worlu or Ekwubudike include
Rumuigbo. Rumuepirikom. Eneka. Rumuadaolu. Rumuorosi. Rukpokwu.Rumuola. Rumuokwuta. Rebisi and Rumueme.26The traditions suggest that Ikwerre is a nickname given to the Iwhuruoha people by the 1gbo. Except for the OzuzuElele-Obio movement discussed under the Etche theory of Ikwerre origin. the traditions are not specific about the routes of migrations. names of places. incidents on the way and relative
length of stops in the course of migrations of the ancestor of Obio as well as Obio himself. But it is agreed that from Obio's alicestral home a combination of factors including fratricidal dissension. local wars and population pressure led the Evo and Apara to establish and painfully consolidate their present-day settlements. The traditions throw some light on the early history of the people in other ways. Reference is made to neighbouring groups. probably pre-existing communities. known as Rumuopara. Akeleke. Rumuchikwee and Rumuezo
against whom the ancestors fought long wars which ultimately led to the extermination of some of these earlier inhabitants. their absorption into the new settlements and their forceful movements elsewhere across the creeks. This issue calls for further research in spite of the reluctance of the traditional historians to supply detailed information on such an interesting aspect of the peopling of the area. Taken together with the traditions from Ogbakiri and43 Isiokpo. the traditions in the Obio-Akpor area clearly show evidence of internal migrations within Ikwerre in pre-colonial times. The Rumuoro and Rumuokani communities today in Ogbakiri trace their origin to migrations ftom the Obio area. The former were led by Echichimo. an enterprising hunter, from Rumuigbo whose "knowledge of the gun attracted the others to come and live close to him for protection against invaders and wild animals." The latter regard their ancestor as a man by name Okani. also a hunter and friend of Echichimo from Rumuokwuta.27
Internal migrations within the Obio - Akpor axis include the movement of the Rumuolumeni people as a result of internal friction in Rumuoparali to their present abode where fierce wars were fought with the pre-existing people of Rumuokwuta. There is also the case of sections of Eneka people who moved into Ogbogoro thus forming a group in the area which recently fought for recognition as a separate entity vis-a-vis the wider Ogbogoro community. The coming of the Rumueme people from Isiokpo to Apara territory is another landmark in the early history of the Obio area. The traditions agree that their ancestors were invited as allies in the war between Ozuruha, a descendant of Epirikom and kinsman of the Isiokpo, and his uncle, Inenta, one of the sons of Apara. In the ensuing conflict the Rumueme warriors showed remarkable valour and succeeded in saving the Rumuepirikom group from imminent doom. The common enemy was eliminated. And it is said that the remnants of the Inenta-group were scattered and today have been integrated in other communities such as Rumuolumeni (Mgbuakara), Bukuma in Kalabari and Isaka in Okrika.28 Rumueme in recognition of its role in times of war and peace eventually emerged as a distinct community in Apara. This is the background to the claim to autonomy within the group which has become a serious ground for controversy in recent times.It is of historical interest to mention the evidence obtained from Chief John Ogbondah which states that Obio actually had three sons, namely Evo, Apara and Ngwa. Ngwa was forced to leave their father's domain owing to the persistent quarrel and misunderstanding between his half-brothers, Evo and Apara. over the traditional burial of their father and the sharing of the common patrimony. Feeling increasingly insecure he moved northwards and finally settled across the lmo River where
he established. his own entity known in the traditions as Ngwa Owhuhu and Ngwa Gbaka. This suggestion of a close relationship between the lkwerre of Obio and the Ngwa people also invites further investigation.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by alj harem(m): 2:51am On Nov 11, 2010
this is very educative
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Afam4eva(m): 10:55am On Nov 11, 2010
This is really informative.
 
 
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 7:06pm On Nov 11, 2010
Info I posted on Abiriba is missing.The moderator should free the auto editor.
 
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 2:58pm On Nov 12, 2010
I'm just trying to retrace origin and relationship of different Igbo groups.Abiriba and Ekoi-Yakur might be the actual origin of Ekpeyes even though the Benin origin is more popular.Going by the existence of Ebiriba as a town in Ekpeye and their supreme God being Obini Ukpabi,the relationship between Abiriba(Cross river Igbo) and Ekpeye needs some study.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 3:16pm On Nov 12, 2010
Abagworo:

It is of historical interest to mention the evidence obtained from Chief John Ogbondah which states that Obio actually had three sons, namely Evo, Apara and Ngwa. Ngwa was forced to leave their father's domain owing to the persistent quarrel and misunderstanding between his half-brothers, Evo and Apara. over the traditional burial of their father and the sharing of the common patrimony. Feeling increasingly insecure he moved northwards and finally settled across the lmo River where
he established. his own entity known in the traditions as Ngwa Owhuhu and Ngwa Gbaka. This suggestion of a close relationship between the lkwerre of Obio and the Ngwa people also invites further investigation.
I'll definitely have to dig into this, because I'm familiar with those names, Evo and Apara, but not like this.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Omenani(m): 4:35pm On Nov 12, 2010
Very informative thread. However, I would like to know the cradle of civilization for the Igbo people.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 5:40pm On Nov 12, 2010
Omenani:

Very informative thread. However, I would like to know the cradle of civilization for the Igbo people.

My answer is from my personal unsupervised research and hence is subject to correction in possible errors from misinformation.

The cradle of Igbo civilization is most probably Nri/Awka.But in the coming years,there were three more pulls that formed the present Igbo culture as we know it.The rise of Benin empire and also slave trade caused movement of people from Benin,Cross river and coastal areas into Igboland.So our culture is quite diverse in the four angles of the pull.

The riverine Igbos are a result of Coastal upward migration of a people once referred to as the Orus who moved deep in to Isu and moved back southwards to found Ndoki and Bonny.These Oru are found in Eastern end of Delta as well as the western end of Imo and Rivers States.

The western Igbos were a mix of Nri/Awka/Isu and a massive migration of people out of the ancient Benin and Igala owing to the various crisis in the then empire which also had Igbos.

Some of the eastern Igbos were once non-Igbos but over the centuries fell to the numerical strength of Igbos who most probably came from Nri/Awka/Isu.Many of them belonged to some of the now extinct groups that once existed around the Cross River and Cameroun mountains.

The Northern Nri/Awka/Isu Igbos are the probable father of the proto Igbo culture.Their major influence is Idoma and Igala who by the way are of the same root with Nri according to traditions.

The Southern Igbo is the most difficult to define because their influence came from all angles and they also hosted slave markets.
Taking the Ikwerres for example,there is an element of all other Igbo dialects in their language but none is exactly thesame.This I believe has a lot to do with slave trade.
 
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 8:29am On Nov 28, 2010
Bashr should read from here and stop his nonsense assumptions about a singular ancestor of all Igbos.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by bashr4: 3:51pm On Nov 28, 2010
Abagworo:

Bashr should read from here and stop his nonsense assumptions about a singular ancestor of all Igbos.
this is just modern history of igbos it still does not indidcate tue origin , remember when the white men came different igbo groups didnt even know others existed, not matter how different the dialect were from rivers up to enugu to abia and imo they all stilll had the same meanings , same culture ,same market days. My thread focused on why people think we are light skined is because we are mixed this thread does not explain the light skin part which runs accross the various villages of igbo settlement.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Obiagu1(m): 5:35pm On Nov 28, 2010
^^^

Our having light skinned folks among us is nature and has nothing to do with being mixed.
In similar vein, South Sudan are very dark skinned (I'll say completely black as in black) and some other Africans have brown to dark skin. Africans have varying dark skin tones and none of us is white like the Asians or Europeans.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by bashr4: 6:29pm On Nov 28, 2010
Obiagu1:

^^^

Our having light skinned folks among us is nature and has nothing to do with being mixed.
In similar vein, South Sudan are very dark skinned (I'll say completely black as in black) and some other Africans have brown to dark skin. Africans have varying dark skin tones and none of us is white like the Asians or Europeans.
thank you very much you are a wise African man, that is exactly the point i was tryin to make in my thread origin of igbos http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-558492.0.html and some ignorant people are askin me for proof or link to show our ligh skin igbos and other tribes dont have european ancestors. We need to shut up the mouth of the idiots that make up these stories.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ezeagu(m): 9:07pm On Mar 06, 2011
Omenani:

Very informative thread. However, I would like to know the cradle of civilization for the Igbo people.

Some people say it's between Nsukka and Okigwe.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by vicenzo(m): 8:16am On Mar 09, 2011
Where is abagworo? This thread is informative and must not be allowed to die.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 2:54am On Apr 03, 2011
History of Otolo Nnewi
by Onwutalobi Anthony Claret

Nnewi was founded in the fourteenth century, and consists of four Quarters (large villages) and these four Quarters of Nnewi are Otolo, Uruagu, Umudim, and Nnewichi. Otolo, a premiere quarter of the four quarters in Nnewi has been outstanding in all aspect of human endeavors. In it seated the mantle of leadership that governs the other quarters for the past decades. Its central success is figured in commercial trade but not limited to it, as its cultural heritage has always been the beacon of light to other neighboring village.

Digbo, one of the sons of Nnewi, had two sons – Otolo and Ikwuabo. It is a custom in Nnewi that a married woman who has no child belongs theoretically to the woman – husband but practically to the man – the husband of that woman husband. One of the wives of Digbo had no child and she therefore married another woman who gave birth to a male child known as Ukwabo.

Otolo the first son of Digbo had many sons – Enem the first son followed by Nnofo, Eziogwugwu alias Eziegbelu, Diaba whose descendants are generally known Umuzu and Nnangana alias Nganaga. Before Otolo begot these, he himself was one. By Otolo originally is meant the descendants of Otolo. Later as consequent upon the success of Eze Agha, Ezekwuabos came under the umbrella of the name. Later still, Amilibas followed suit and so did the rest at appropriate times. It was in this way that Otolo as a quarter was made up

Otolo is the premier quarter in Nnewi. This is true in terms of population, seat of political power and, apparently even, concentration of wealth. There are facts recognized by the other three quarters of Nnewi. These factors have perhaps influenced it in its attitude. In Nnewi affairs, Otolo conduct is one of a leader and a bully. Otolo people have in them a belief that every Otolo man is infallible. Because of this belief, an Otolo man defends his fellow Otolo men in the face of obvious culpability.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ezeagu(m): 10:21pm On Apr 30, 2011
Igbuzor

About Igbuzo (Ibusa) people

Igbuzo is a city in Delta State, south-south, Nigeria with an estimated population of 452,300 people in 2007. The Ianguage of the people is referred to as Enuani. The community forming the process of Igbuzo can be linked to the first wave of the movement of Igbo migrants into the West Bank of River Niger, this adventure which took place in the 15th century resulted in the settlement of Ibusa people led by Edini from Nshi (Nri) The second of the two waves of the migrations that resulted in the formation of Ibusa was led by Umejei from Isu.
Pre-colonial history

Pre-colonial history of Ibusa indicates that the name Ibuzor is more precisely accurate as regards to the location of the town 6 kilometers west of the Niger River than the view which holds that the pre-colonial name of Ibusa originated from the whimsical view that the initial settlers are Igbos who live by the road side.

Igbo historians such as Emeka Esogbue (of Ibusa origin) and C. N. Ugochukwu (Nnewi origin) share the opinion that groups who left Benin with Ezechima and journeyed Eastward might have settled in Ibusa considering the geographical location of the town. The implication of this therefore is that this new set of settlers could have been sick or generally lacking in interest in furthering their journey, this could also have resulted in their final settlement in not too distant Onitsha. This new group of settlers in Ibusa might have become assimilated by the Umejei and Edini groups.

Oral history
Ibusa is a federation of two units known as “the Umejei and Ogboli Factors. According to the oral history of the town, Umejei Nwa Eze Isu (Prince Umejei of Isu) at Isu in the South-Eastern region of Nigeria killed his opponent in a traditional wrestling bout, an act considered “Alu” (Abomination) in the land and punishable by death. However, his death was commuted by his father who was also Eze Isu) the king of Isu and he was encouraged to go on exile with a gourd prepared and given to him by his father. Umejei was emphatically instructed to settle wherever the pot dropped, he thus set-off with friends, relations and symapathizers who accompanied him. The gourd however dropped at the present site of Ani-Oshe in Omeze (Umueze) where he founded Ibusa.

The Ogboli factor has it that at Nshi (Nri) Odaigbo slept with one of his father’s wives but rather than face the mandatory death sentence Eze Nshi commuted the death sentence to exile. His father, mother and younger brother, Edini voluntarily opted to accompany him. Odaigbo and Edini were given one pot each and charms by Eze Nshi with the instruction to settle wherever the pot fell and on crossing the River Niger, Edini’s pot fell at Ani-Oshe (Umueze) the present site of Ibusa while he founded Ibusa. Odaigbo’s pot was to fall at the present site of Ogwashi-Uku where he also settled. The groups (Umejei and Edini later became one and known as Ibusa) The Ogboli of Ibusa are thus regarded as part of the larger Nri (Nshi) community.

The Igbo and Anioma people of Delta state, regard and praise Ibusa as group of people who often refuse food in other to prosecute wars (Isu (Igbuzo) fu ogu ju nni). This statement authenticates the bravery of these people in wars. Igbuzo historians are currently conducting researches on the history of wars fought by the Igbuzo people especially in the homes of their Isu kiths and kin in Nnewi, present Anambra State.

"Ibusa" is an Anglicisation of "Igbuzo" and/or Ibuzo by the early British missionaries and visitors to the town as a result of difficulty in pronunciation. The Anglicization of the name of the town may have been effected in the 19th century following the Ekwumekwu Wars that the community led. The "Ibusa" was considered more distinctive by the British thus adopted as the official name of the town and made to appear in all the official documents of the colonial government. The name "Igbuzo" (Igbo bi na uzor) meaning the Igbo living along the way or road is however the native name of the town as used today.

The nickname of the town is however "Isu Na Mba Ogu" (Warriors from Isu) or colloqually Igbuzo-Isu (The Igbo-uzo(r) from Isu). Ibusa is uniquely addressed with different names and even made noticeable with different spellings such as Ibusa, Igbuzo, Igbouzo, Igbuzor, Ibuzor, Ibuza and Ibuzo. This is believed to have been necessitated by the strategic location of the town along the busy roads and the history of the settlement of the people.

http://www.ibusa-usa.net/about-us.php
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by alj_harem: 6:58pm On May 03, 2011
sugabelly:

OMG these stup1d people have come again.

Shameless Igbo people with low self esteem desperate to be Hebrew

You are not Hebrew and you are not Jews

You are IGBO.

Sorry if that's not good enough for you. Move to Israel and see if they welcome you.
angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry


why are you angry

if u were igbo and u have nothing better to do with ur life in this forsaken world, wouldn't u claim jewish as well undecided
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by abadaba(m): 11:37pm On May 04, 2011
sugabelly:

OMG these stup1d people have come again.

Shameless Igbo people with low self esteem desperate to be Hebrew

You are not Hebrew and you are not Jews

You are IGBO.

Sorry if that's not good enough for you. Move to Israel and see if they welcome you.
angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry

Ashawo, get out of here. Daughter of a prostituting mother.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by vicenzo(m): 2:08pm On May 10, 2011
alj_harem:

why are you angry

if u were igbo and u have nothing better to do with your life in this forsaken world, wouldn't u claim jewish as well undecided


ewu awusa.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by afrodiva: 6:39am On Jun 24, 2011
At abagworo
Because a village in Ekpeye is called Ebiriba, You now want to rewrite our history. What is this obsession with igbos trying so hard to disprove Ekpeyes Benin history.This is history that has been told centuries before the whiteman came or the biafran war. You make my ancestors out to  be liars. Considering the fact that cross rivers state and benin are miles apart. Stating that our history needs more research is a politically correct way of saying my ancestors are liars .

1 Like

Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by PAGAN 9JA(m): 5:52pm On Jun 24, 2011
sugabelly:

OMG these stup1d people have come again.

Shameless Igbo people with low self esteem desperate to be Hebrew
You are not Hebrew and you are not Jews
You are IGBO.

Sorry if that's not good enough for you. Move to Israel and see if they welcome you.
angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry


FINALLY!!!!!!!! somewun sensible.  smiley

imagine Igbos marchin to Israel, claiming to be hebrews. the Israelis gnna think these ppl r gon conk.  cheesy cheesy cheesy cheesy cheesy cheesy cheesy



Abagworo:



ORIGIN:

NRI KINGDOM is the oldest Kingdom in Nigeria. It was founded around 900AD by the progenitor, Eri, the son of Gad. According to biblical accounts, Jacob had Leah as his wife who begot four sons for him. When  Leah noticed she had passed child-bearing age, she gave her maid – servant, Zilpah to Jacob to wife, and through Zilpah he had a son named Gad. Gad then bigot Eri, who later formed a clan known as Erites vide Genesis Chapter 30 verse 9; 46 verse 16 and Numbers chapter 26 verses 15-19. Eri was therefore amongst  the twelve tribes of Israel via Gad.

During their stay in Egypt Eri became the high priest and spiritual adviser to Pharaoh Teti, the fifth dynastic king of Egypt around 2400 BC.

During the Exodus, which marked the beginning of the mass movement of the tribes of Israel, the tribe of Eri was amongst the tribe that left Egypt following the injunction from God to the Israelites (see Deuteronomy chapter 28 verses 58 – 68). Some of these tribes founded settlements in the southern part of Sudan, where they established the “Nok” culture, which is similar to that of other (sun Cult) culture, like Nri, Fiji, Samoa, and Jukun in the Northern part of Nigeria and elsewhere. But others who could not remain in the Southern Sudan traveled further South, some branched off to Jukun, in Northern part of Nigeria, others continued and arrived at the confluence of Rivers Niger and Anambara known as “Ezu-na-Ọmambala” and settled there while some veered off to the Island of Fiji in the South Pacific Ocean. An intelligence report notes that the Fijians have the same sun culture with the people of Nri.




omg here we go again. Igbos were FOREST-DWELLING PAGANS since the dawn of religion n mankind!!!!!! they just became christian a few 100 yrs bak!!!!'

n here we hav all these weerd n sensless biblical theories. angry angry angry angry
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 8:49pm On Jun 25, 2011
afrodiva:

NAt abagworo
Because a village in ekpeyeis called ebiriba. You now want to rewrite our history. What is this obsession with igbos trying so hard to disprove ekpeyes Benin history. History that has been told centuries before whiteman came or the biafran war. You make my ancestors out to  be liars. Considering the fact that cross erivers state andn enin are miles apart.stating that our history needs more research
. Is a politically correct way of saying my ancestors are liars

It is quite wrong to assume than study.I suggested something and rather than do that you came out to assume that I am against your recently manufactured tradition of origin.Ekpeye traditionally worships thesame God with Abiriba and Arochukwu.Obini Ukpabi.That suggests early interaction.

I am of the school of thought that Ekpeye is the only Igbo related language that can stand on its own as separate but similar in every respect.I live with a lot of them and hear the language.They are distinct just like Itsekiri is to Yoruba.

My own belief on Ekpeye is that it consists of three group of people viz Igbo,Ijaw and Edo with Igbo and Ijaw being majority.Edo is the least significant.It is highly probable that the only Edo blood is in the kingship lineage.Note that I am not an authority in Ekpeye history so I just gave an analysis based on association with Ekpeyes,

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