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Best European Country - Travel (3) - Nairaland

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Which European Country Is Good For Someone To Relocate Too / Best European Country To Live And Obtain Resident Permit On Time / Atleast Nigeria Is Visa Free To One Strong European Country; Andorra (1) (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Best European Country by surecan: 10:39pm On Dec 26, 2012
Bros u did not clear one doubt for my last question.Again if my wife get in there now as a student,what will be the best way for me to join her may be in 6 to 7 months time
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 11:59pm On Dec 26, 2012
surecan: Bros u did not clear one doubt for my last question.Again if my wife get in there now as a student,what will be the best way for me to join her may be in 6 to 7 months time

Tot u said u're not in 9ja? I don't understand you really?
Re: Best European Country by surecan: 12:29am On Dec 27, 2012
dotcom_na_me_na_me:

Tot u said u're not in 9ja? I don't understand you really?

Not in Nigeria does not mean that i know every thing,am just trying to relocate to another country but i dont intend moving now because am still busy with my work.
If you look at my page you will notice that i am still pursuing canada also but i am just looking for plan B,she was denied canada visa earlier this year and we are yet to give up but still need ur information as well.I demanded you to add me so that we can talk better but u said that here is better and there is no way i be will talking about my whole plans and personality on the forum like this.Note that my wife is still in Nigeria presently
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 1:06am On Dec 27, 2012
surecan:

Not in Nigeria does not mean that i know every thing,am just trying to relocate to another country but i dont intend moving now because am still busy with my work.
If you look at my page you will notice that i am still pursuing canada also but i am just looking for plan B,she was denied canada visa earlier this year and we are yet to give up but still need ur information as well.I demanded you to add me so that we can talk better but u said that here is better and there is no way i be will talking about my whole plans and personality on the forum like this.Note that my wife is still in Nigeria presently

Ok, now i understand you. I guess you're in UK? Why don't you try US student for your wife? US do gives student visa better than Canada and others... The chance of getting US student is far better i think so... or what do you think? Since you said if Ireland is like UK u would prefer her to stay in 9ja, and we all know that Ireland & UK shares same system... wink
Re: Best European Country by Markenny(m): 7:24am On Dec 27, 2012
i dont really have time to reply u question...what do u kwn abaout german law?who is deciving who?
you said germany is not a good place for a first timer without a student visa or residency from Nigeria you are wrong
.with or with without permit you are almost as a german citizen,as far as you are not aways in a wrong places....i lived in many countries and i come to understand that germany is the best place for first timer.since am liveing in germany i nerva come accross police control for onces,if u are in austria as a black person,u will understand what i mean about police silly control.if you are in germany go to used car spear parts market,ask any nigerian u see there if he even have ADRO paper talk more of permit,german adro might be bad but if u cound survive for one year with out
deportation,u are title to work in germany(check there new law as for 2011),





dotcom_na_me_na_me:

So, is that a life? having babies for people u don't love all in the name of PAPER.

Secondly, stop misleading people here..

Germany is not the place for first timer without a student visa or residency from Nigeria.
IF you go to Germany with a visit visa and end up as illegal, you're already in the next available flight to the burnt MMIA that burnt this morning in Lagos Nigeria.

And who told you that paper is very easy in Germany? Germany is very tough in terms of having papers and the only solution is either you have baby for a German u don't love or for a real relationship, and or any EU woman, and or you're granted Refugee Status as an Asylum seeker.
So, if you and your woman are visit visa holder and have baby in Germany, you will be deported sure banka, because you're not entitled to any residency unless one of you is an EU citizen or residency holder, and before you become a German citizen u have to use your residency for 8 years.

Germany is not easy to get paper! Let them know the truth before your information begin sending people to Germany and become illegal there.

Everybody staying in Germany for more than 3 months must obtain a residence permit, excluding EU citizens that are only required to register with their local Einwohnermeldeamt. And to get a German paper, Registering with the police is one of the first things you have to do following your arrival in Germany, except you're applying for Asylum which i don't think you will stand 5% as a Nigerian, except a miracle from baba God.

Getting a 'polizeiliche Anmeldebestätigung' requires a visit to the local registration office ('Einwohnermeldeamt/Meldestelle'), which is normally part of the local police station or town hall, and u must do this within seven days of arrival in Germany, or at least once you have accommodation.

And you will certainly need a Valid Nigerian passport to do all these, so tell me, will you tender your expired visa? Thats the door to Nigeria grin
The rules for what you need to get a residence permit may vary somewhat from place to place and according to your status. You'll certainly need a valid passport, a couple of “biometric” photos, proof that you have a place to live, proof of health insurance and proof that you can support yourself. Other things you may need include proof that you have a critical skill, proof that you are married, proof that you have independent means or a pension, a health certificate and a certificate of good conduct.

Registering is a simple matter of going there and filling out a form, but they must see your passport and they must not see your expired visa, except if you're an asylum visa. And the only solution is to get married while your Asylum application is on processing, but if your Asylum case finish unsucesssful before you get married, then you're smelling Nigeria. These are what you should let people know about how hard Germany is for illegal people O!

The truth is: the only way you can enjoy Germany is only when you get their RESIDENCY or their PASSPORT, even student you're still in ''ko easy'' lol kiss
The two types of residence permits are limited (Aufenthaltserlaubnis) and unlimited (Niederlassungserlaubnis). The Niederlassungserlaubnis can normally only be applied for after several years of continuous residence or if certain special requirements are met, Oh boy, GERMANy no easy O!

Re: Best European Country by Markenny(m): 7:40am On Dec 27, 2012
it depend the kind of permit you have, have you consider checking this(§28 ABS.! satz 1nr.3 aufenthg)if your permit inccude with the § why will you have to stay 8 years.





it depend the kind of permit you have, have you consider checking this(§28 ABS.! satz 1nr.3 aufenthg)if your permit inccude with the § why will you have to stay 8 years to naturalization. you said German citizenship law says: A person is eligible for naturalization once they have lived legally in Germany for eight years and have permanent residence status. can you pls write down the § qoute, i want to see from wich year your are talking about,




[quote author=dotcom_na_me_na_me]

Children born in Germany to non-German parents automatically acquire German citizenship at birth, as long as one of the parents has lived in Germany for at least 8 years and has the right of permanent residence
So, even though if both you and your baby mother are in Germany as a student, you’re entitled to NOTHING.
At least, one of you must have residency status and must have lived in Germany for 8 years
RESIDENCY is different from STUDENT VISA. As a student , you are only in Germany to study and they expect you to leave Germany with you baby and the baby mother.
You are only entitled to your baby’s German Birth certificate. That’s all..
German citizenship law says: A person is eligible for naturalization once they have lived legally in Germany for eight years and have permanent residence status.
Re: Best European Country by surecan: 7:44am On Dec 27, 2012
dotcom_na_me_na_me:

Ok, now i understand you. I guess you're in UK? Why don't you try US student for your wife? US do gives student visa better than Canada and others... The chance of getting US student is far better i think so... or what do you think? Since you said if Ireland is like UK u would prefer her to stay in 9ja, and we all know that Ireland & UK shares same system... wink

Thank you,you know what i mean by UK practices is that because it is very hard to get job there presently
Re: Best European Country by surecan: 7:53am On Dec 27, 2012
@Markenny,please take it easy,we all here are learning on daily basis,i know that my friend who have been helping me the information he heard may have made mistake some where but i prefer you to just pinpoint the place,correct it and give your own advice and suggestion so that we can continue to be moving on.I don't like us to be arguing for what does not mean any thing.I hope you will understand,thank you
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 8:09am On Dec 27, 2012
Markenny: it depend the kind of permit you have, have you consider checking this(§28 ABS.! satz 1nr.3 aufenthg)if your permit inccude with the § why will you have to stay 8 years.





it depend the kind of permit you have, have you consider checking this(§28 ABS.! satz 1nr.3 aufenthg)if your permit inccude with the § why will you have to stay 8 years to naturalization. you said German citizenship law says: A person is eligible for naturalization once they have lived legally in Germany for eight years and have permanent residence status. can you pls write down the § qoute, i want to see from wich year your are talking about,






You're not just the type i'll should ague with, cos am done with KNOW NOTHING like you and your twin brother iluminati on this page http://www.nairaland.com/676173/german-embassy-visa/31 are expert in aguement.. So, i'm not afraid.

Secondly, did ''Surecan'' tell you that his wife is a GERMAN? Some people are just funny, they will just begin dey jump into conclusion like kangaroo when dem no even confirm what they're about to conclude on.. Mtchewwwwwwwwwww

If you don't know anything about German CITIZENSHIP LAW, better you ask those who knows more than you rather than ague what you don't have a clue about ! You know i sabi talk wella...

Now listen!

German citizenship is based primarily on the principle of jus sanguinis. In other words one usually acquires German citizenship if a parent is a German citizen, irrespective of place of birth

A significant reform to the nationality law was passed by the Bundestag (the German parliament) in 1999, and came into force on 1 January 2000. The new law makes it somewhat easier for foreigners resident in Germany on a long-term basis, and especially their German-born children, to acquire German citizenship

Birth in Germany

Children born on or after 1 January 2000 to non-German parents acquire German citizenship at birth if at least one parent:
has a permanent residence permit; and
has been residing in Germany for at least eight years.

Such children will be required to apply successfully to retain German citizenship by the age of 23. Assuming the laws (very unlikely[citation needed]) are not changed prior to 2023, they will normally be required to prove they do not hold any other foreign citizenship. The only exceptions are EU citizens and citizens of countries where it is impossible to lose your citizenship, like Morocco or Iran, for example.
Parents who are citizens of European Economic Area states or Switzerland are eligible to receive permanent resident permits after five years.

Naturalisation by entitlement

An individual who fulfils all of the following criteria has an entitlement to naturalise as a German citizen:
he/she has been ordinarily resident in Germany for at least 8 years (this period can be reduced - see below)
he/she has legal capacity or a legal representative
confirms his/her present and past commitment to the free democratic constitutional system enshrined in the German Basic Law (or that he is presently committed to such principles and has departed from former support of ideas contrary to such principles)
he/she is a European Union or Swiss citizen in possession of the appropriate residence permit which permits the free movement of persons, or he/she is a non-EU/Swiss citizen who has been granted a permanent right of residence
he/she is able to support himself/herself without recourse to benefits
he/she has not been sentenced for an unlawful act and is not subject to any court order imposing a measure of reform and prevention
he/she possesses an adequate knowledge of German
possesses knowledge of the legal system, the society and living conditions in the Federal Republic of Germany
An individual who does not have legal capacity is entitled to naturalise as a German citizen merely through ordinary residence in Germany for at least 8 years - he/she does not have to fulfil the other criteria (e.g. adequate command of the German language and ability to be self-supporting without recourse to benefits).
Applicants for naturalisation are normally expected to prove they have renounced their existing nationality, or will lose this automatically upon naturalisation. An exception applies to those unable to give up their nationality easily (such as refugees). A further exception applies to citizens of Switzerland and the European Union member states.
An individual who is entitled to naturalise as a German citizen can also apply for his/her spouse and minor children to be naturalised at the same time (his/her spouse and minor children need not have ordinarily resided in Germany for at least 8 years).
Exceptions to the normal residence requirements include:
persons who have completed an integration course may have the residence requirement reduced to 7 years
If a person shows that he/she is especially well integrated and has a higher level of command of the German language than the basic requirement for the German citizenship may have the residence requirement reduced to 6 years
The spouse of a German citizen may be naturalised after 3 years of continual residency in Germany. The marriage must have persisted for at least 2 years.
refugees and stateless persons may be able to apply after 6 years of continual residency
former German citizens


The spouse of a German citizen may be naturalised after 3 years of continual residency in Germany. The marriage must have persisted for at least 2 years.
refugees and stateless persons may be able to apply after 6 years of continual residency
former German citizens


Did ''Surecan'' stated his wife is a German?
Does he stated all about Student couple to have baby born there and the child's right to German citizenship? olodo undecided
U think you know how to talk abi?

Residence Act
Chapter 2 - Entry and residence in Germany (§ § 3 - 42 )
Section 6 - family reasons (§ § 27 - 36 )
§ 28
family reunification with Germans

(1) The residence is the foreign

First Spouse of a German,
Second minor unmarried child of a German,
Third Parent of a minor, unmarried Germans to exercise the child's care
be given if the German has his habitual residence in the federal territory. It is different from § 5 para 1 No. 1 issue in the cases of sentence 1, No. 2 and 3. You should usually deviating from § 5 para 1, No. 1 in the cases of sentence 1 No. 1 issued. You can, notwithstanding § 5 para 1 No. 1 of the non-person custodial parent a minor, unmarried Germans will be granted if the family community is lived in Germany. § 30 Abs 1 sentence 1 no 1 and 2, Clause 3 and Section 2 Sentence 1 in the cases of sentence 1 No. 1 apply accordingly.

(2) the alien is to be issued is usually a settlement permit if his three years in possession of a residence permit, continues the family unity with the Germans in Germany, no grounds for expulsion and he can interact in a simple way in German. Moreover, the residence permit will be extended as long as the family unity persists.

(3) § § 31 and 35 are subject to the proviso that in the place of the residence permit of the foreigner, the habitual residence of the German in Germany occurs.

(4) For other family members, § 36 shall apply.

(5) The residence permit for employment purposes.

You know nada my man !

I no get your time again... get other stuffs to deal with ...
Re: Best European Country by surecan: 8:20am On Dec 27, 2012
my friend what of the criteria for permanent residence permit,i am not even interested in naturalization
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 8:23am On Dec 27, 2012
surecan: @Markenny,please take it easy,we all here are learning on daily basis,i know that my friend who have been helping me the information he heard may have made mistake some where but i prefer you to just pinpoint the place,correct it and give your own advice and suggestion so that we can continue to be moving on.I don't like us to be arguing for what does not mean any thing.I hope you will understand,thank you

Don't mind him, he's a twin brother to Illuminati... they don't have a clue about German Citizenship law, and they actually don't know the difference between STUDENT VISA, RESIDENCY LEAVE TO REMAIN, AND CITIZENSHIP BY NATURALIZATION & BY BIRTH

All they knows is means of getting the residency and thats what they're trying to point out...
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 8:55am On Dec 27, 2012
surecan: my friend what of the criteria for permanent residence permit,i am not even interested in naturalization

I wonder o bro, pls help me tell him that you're not asking about naturalization O!

Anyway..

Every long-term visitor coming to Germany must get a residence visa (the real term is "residence permit" or "Aufenthaltserlaubnis"

This must be applied for if you are planning on staying for more than three months.
You must obtain this residence permit (residence visa) within three months of your arrival in Germany.

For instance, if for tourist visa, your tourist visa is good for only the first three months. So, there is no way around it. The earlier you apply for the residence visa, the better are your chances to get it on time.

There are two kinds of residence visa: a limited (or temporary) residence visa, it is valid for a certain period of time and you must leave the country at the end of that time; and an unlimited (no "expiry date"wink residence visa which does not expire. People having an EU passport automatically get this last one, the unlimited residence permit. For others, with the limited residence visa, they can reapply for a new one at the end of the period.

But, before going to the Landratsamt to get your residence visa (permit) you must register at your local Registration Office (Einwohnermeldeamt, usually the city hall in small towns) where you live. You have to do this within the first 10 to 14 days after you arrive (it varies from one city to another. Call your Rathaus (City Hall) for details). The document that you will get is called Meldeschein (registration certificate), or Anmeldebestätigung (residents registration permit). It is easy to get:

You go there, bring with you your passport and a proof of your permanent address in Germany (rental contract for example) and fill out a form.

You MUST bring this Meldeschein (registration certificate) with you at the Ausländerbehörde or Landratsamt to get your residence visa (permit).

Also, if you move residence during your stay in Germany, you must register a new at the local Registration Office (Einwohnermeldeamt) and notify the old registration office of your move (even if it is next door).

There are a few documents that you must bring with you for the residence visa:

-valid passport, one per person
-two passport photos per person (taken by a professional)
-proof that you have a place to live (rental contract)
-proof that you can support yourself and your family (if applicable) financially
-proof of health insurance
-proof of marriage (if applicable)
-Meldeschein
-sometimes, birth certificates (especially for the children)

Also, be aware that most photocopies, even if they have been authenticated by a notary or a lawyer, are not acceptable. So, you must bring the originals with you.

Here's some important advice for common-law couples since you said you and your wife (i.e. that live together without being married in germany): Germany does NOT recognize you as a legal couple, even if you have been together for 20 years. Which means, that if only one of you has a job (financial resources), they will not give a residence visa to the partner, unless he/she can demonstrate that they have skills in demand in Germany and that they will find a job. Fast.
Of course, the easiest solution would be to get married!

but, getting married in Germany is not that easy. You must both have your passport, the Meldeschein, your birth certificates translated into German, and proof that you are not already married to someone else! Quite a few countries don't have that sort of certificate. The German authorities realize that, but they still want you to contact your Embassy or Consulate to obtain an official document (that you must pay for) certifying that such a certificate does not exist in your country! Frankly, if you want my advice, get married in 9ja for a fast little wedding ceremony!

Another important point is that the children follow their mother, even if both Mom's and Dad's names are on the birth certificates.
This also means that if Mommy does not get her visa, the kids have to leave with her!


Now, when you have all the paperwork together, you and your family must all go personally to apply for the residence permit. Although the process varies slightly with each individual, and from one region or city to the next, most rules are the same.

Once you arrive at the Landratsamt, there should be an information desk in the entrance hall where you ask for the Aufenthaltserlaubnis (residence permit) Büro. Once there, you will probably see a bunch of closed doors with capital letters beside or on them.

When your visa is ready, they will most probably call you and ask you to come and pick it up. But you will first be required to pay the administrative fee.

Another very important point: these German officials take themselves and their work very seriously. So, always be very polite and keep calm. It is a long and frustrating process, but it has to be done. Period. Don't mind that guy who does not know anything about Germany. Did he knows if i lived in Germany or not or must i be telling people?

1 Like

Re: Best European Country by Markenny(m): 10:40am On Dec 27, 2012
am not trying to ague either , i just want to kwn from which year those laws was made.afar as i kwn,the german laws as for 2011 states that you are not allowed to be deported if you have have a child in german.with or with out resident permit.(ofcause on of the perent must have permit or eu citzen.)


dotcom_na_me_na_me:


You're not just the type i'll should ague with, cos am done with KNOW NOTHING like you and your twin brother iluminati on this page http://www.nairaland.com/676173/german-embassy-visa/31 are expert in aguement.. So, i'm not afraid.

Secondly, did ''Surecan'' tell you that his wife is a GERMAN? Some people are just funny, they will just begin dey jump into conclusion like kangaroo when dem no even confirm what they're about to conclude on.. Mtchewwwwwwwwwww

If you don't know anything about German CITIZENSHIP LAW, better you ask those who knows more than you rather than ague what you don't have a clue about ! You know i sabi talk wella...

Now listen!

German citizenship is based primarily on the principle of jus sanguinis. In other words one usually acquires German citizenship if a parent is a German citizen, irrespective of place of birth

A significant reform to the nationality law was passed by the Bundestag (the German parliament) in 1999, and came into force on 1 January 2000. The new law makes it somewhat easier for foreigners resident in Germany on a long-term basis, and especially their German-born children, to acquire German citizenship

Birth in Germany

Children born on or after 1 January 2000 to non-German parents acquire German citizenship at birth if at least one parent:
has a permanent residence permit; and
has been residing in Germany for at least eight years.

Such children will be required to apply successfully to retain German citizenship by the age of 23. Assuming the laws (very unlikely[citation needed]) are not changed prior to 2023, they will normally be required to prove they do not hold any other foreign citizenship. The only exceptions are EU citizens and citizens of countries where it is impossible to lose your citizenship, like Morocco or Iran, for example.
Parents who are citizens of European Economic Area states or Switzerland are eligible to receive permanent resident permits after five years.

Naturalisation by entitlement

An individual who fulfils all of the following criteria has an entitlement to naturalise as a German citizen:
he/she has been ordinarily resident in Germany for at least 8 years (this period can be reduced - see below)
he/she has legal capacity or a legal representative
confirms his/her present and past commitment to the free democratic constitutional system enshrined in the German Basic Law (or that he is presently committed to such principles and has departed from former support of ideas contrary to such principles)
he/she is a European Union or Swiss citizen in possession of the appropriate residence permit which permits the free movement of persons, or he/she is a non-EU/Swiss citizen who has been granted a permanent right of residence
he/she is able to support himself/herself without recourse to benefits
he/she has not been sentenced for an unlawful act and is not subject to any court order imposing a measure of reform and prevention
he/she possesses an adequate knowledge of German
possesses knowledge of the legal system, the society and living conditions in the Federal Republic of Germany
An individual who does not have legal capacity is entitled to naturalise as a German citizen merely through ordinary residence in Germany for at least 8 years - he/she does not have to fulfil the other criteria (e.g. adequate command of the German language and ability to be self-supporting without recourse to benefits).
Applicants for naturalisation are normally expected to prove they have renounced their existing nationality, or will lose this automatically upon naturalisation. An exception applies to those unable to give up their nationality easily (such as refugees). A further exception applies to citizens of Switzerland and the European Union member states.
An individual who is entitled to naturalise as a German citizen can also apply for his/her spouse and minor children to be naturalised at the same time (his/her spouse and minor children need not have ordinarily resided in Germany for at least 8 years).
Exceptions to the normal residence requirements include:
persons who have completed an integration course may have the residence requirement reduced to 7 years
If a person shows that he/she is especially well integrated and has a higher level of command of the German language than the basic requirement for the German citizenship may have the residence requirement reduced to 6 years
The spouse of a German citizen may be naturalised after 3 years of continual residency in Germany. The marriage must have persisted for at least 2 years.
refugees and stateless persons may be able to apply after 6 years of continual residency
former German citizens


The spouse of a German citizen may be naturalised after 3 years of continual residency in Germany. The marriage must have persisted for at least 2 years.
refugees and stateless persons may be able to apply after 6 years of continual residency
former German citizens


Did ''Surecan'' stated his wife is a German?
Does he stated all about Student couple to have baby born there and the child's right to German citizenship? olodo undecided
U think you know how to talk abi?

Residence Act
Chapter 2 - Entry and residence in Germany (§ § 3 - 42 )
Section 6 - family reasons (§ § 27 - 36 )
§ 28
family reunification with Germans

(1) The residence is the foreign

First Spouse of a German,
Second minor unmarried child of a German,
Third Parent of a minor, unmarried Germans to exercise the child's care
be given if the German has his habitual residence in the federal territory. It is different from § 5 para 1 No. 1 issue in the cases of sentence 1, No. 2 and 3. You should usually deviating from § 5 para 1, No. 1 in the cases of sentence 1 No. 1 issued. You can, notwithstanding § 5 para 1 No. 1 of the non-person custodial parent a minor, unmarried Germans will be granted if the family community is lived in Germany. § 30 Abs 1 sentence 1 no 1 and 2, Clause 3 and Section 2 Sentence 1 in the cases of sentence 1 No. 1 apply accordingly.

(2) the alien is to be issued is usually a settlement permit if his three years in possession of a residence permit, continues the family unity with the Germans in Germany, no grounds for expulsion and he can interact in a simple way in German. Moreover, the residence permit will be extended as long as the family unity persists.

(3) § § 31 and 35 are subject to the proviso that in the place of the residence permit of the foreigner, the habitual residence of the German in Germany occurs.

(4) For other family members, § 36 shall apply.

(5) The residence permit for employment purposes.

You know nada my man !

I no get your time again... get other stuffs to deal with ...
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 10:50am On Dec 27, 2012
Markenny: am not trying to ague either , i just want to kwn from which year those laws was made.afar as i kwn,the german laws as for 2011 states that you are not allowed to be deported if you have have a child in german.with or with out resident permit.(ofcause on of the perent must have permit or eu citzen.)



You never said that before !
Re: Best European Country by Markenny(m): 10:56am On Dec 27, 2012
talking about laws in germany,i hope you kwn that germany have 16 states,and those 16 states have different laws about permit and stuff like that,most of the laws you read in the internet is almost old.for exmple...bayern is far worse for permit than baden württemberg. you keep talking about 8 years,iam trying to tell you that,it old laws as for 2011 it have been change,onces you have permit to stay and work in germany,(you have to stay in germany and no one is deproting you as far as the child is not 18 years old)thats is the meaning of this §.(§28 ABS.! satz 1nr.3 aufenthg)


dotcom_na_me_na_me:


You're not just the type i'll should ague with, cos am done with KNOW NOTHING like you and your twin brother iluminati on this page http://www.nairaland.com/676173/german-embassy-visa/31 are expert in aguement.. So, i'm not afraid.

Secondly, did ''Surecan'' tell you that his wife is a GERMAN? Some people are just funny, they will just begin dey jump into conclusion like kangaroo when dem no even confirm what they're about to conclude on.. Mtchewwwwwwwwwww

If you don't know anything about German CITIZENSHIP LAW, better you ask those who knows more than you rather than ague what you don't have a clue about ! You know i sabi talk wella...

Now listen!

German citizenship is based primarily on the principle of jus sanguinis. In other words one usually acquires German citizenship if a parent is a German citizen, irrespective of place of birth

A significant reform to the nationality law was passed by the Bundestag (the German parliament) in 1999, and came into force on 1 January 2000. The new law makes it somewhat easier for foreigners resident in Germany on a long-term basis, and especially their German-born children, to acquire German citizenship

Birth in Germany

Children born on or after 1 January 2000 to non-German parents acquire German citizenship at birth if at least one parent:
has a permanent residence permit; and
has been residing in Germany for at least eight years.

Such children will be required to apply successfully to retain German citizenship by the age of 23. Assuming the laws (very unlikely[citation needed]) are not changed prior to 2023, they will normally be required to prove they do not hold any other foreign citizenship. The only exceptions are EU citizens and citizens of countries where it is impossible to lose your citizenship, like Morocco or Iran, for example.
Parents who are citizens of European Economic Area states or Switzerland are eligible to receive permanent resident permits after five years.

Naturalisation by entitlement

An individual who fulfils all of the following criteria has an entitlement to naturalise as a German citizen:
he/she has been ordinarily resident in Germany for at least 8 years (this period can be reduced - see below)
he/she has legal capacity or a legal representative
confirms his/her present and past commitment to the free democratic constitutional system enshrined in the German Basic Law (or that he is presently committed to such principles and has departed from former support of ideas contrary to such principles)
he/she is a European Union or Swiss citizen in possession of the appropriate residence permit which permits the free movement of persons, or he/she is a non-EU/Swiss citizen who has been granted a permanent right of residence
he/she is able to support himself/herself without recourse to benefits
he/she has not been sentenced for an unlawful act and is not subject to any court order imposing a measure of reform and prevention
he/she possesses an adequate knowledge of German
possesses knowledge of the legal system, the society and living conditions in the Federal Republic of Germany
An individual who does not have legal capacity is entitled to naturalise as a German citizen merely through ordinary residence in Germany for at least 8 years - he/she does not have to fulfil the other criteria (e.g. adequate command of the German language and ability to be self-supporting without recourse to benefits).
Applicants for naturalisation are normally expected to prove they have renounced their existing nationality, or will lose this automatically upon naturalisation. An exception applies to those unable to give up their nationality easily (such as refugees). A further exception applies to citizens of Switzerland and the European Union member states.
An individual who is entitled to naturalise as a German citizen can also apply for his/her spouse and minor children to be naturalised at the same time (his/her spouse and minor children need not have ordinarily resided in Germany for at least 8 years).
Exceptions to the normal residence requirements include:
persons who have completed an integration course may have the residence requirement reduced to 7 years
If a person shows that he/she is especially well integrated and has a higher level of command of the German language than the basic requirement for the German citizenship may have the residence requirement reduced to 6 years
The spouse of a German citizen may be naturalised after 3 years of continual residency in Germany. The marriage must have persisted for at least 2 years.
refugees and stateless persons may be able to apply after 6 years of continual residency
former German citizens


The spouse of a German citizen may be naturalised after 3 years of continual residency in Germany. The marriage must have persisted for at least 2 years.
refugees and stateless persons may be able to apply after 6 years of continual residency
former German citizens


Did ''Surecan'' stated his wife is a German?
Does he stated all about Student couple to have baby born there and the child's right to German citizenship? olodo undecided
U think you know how to talk abi?

Residence Act
Chapter 2 - Entry and residence in Germany (§ § 3 - 42 )
Section 6 - family reasons (§ § 27 - 36 )
§ 28
family reunification with Germans

(1) The residence is the foreign

First Spouse of a German,
Second minor unmarried child of a German,
Third Parent of a minor, unmarried Germans to exercise the child's care
be given if the German has his habitual residence in the federal territory. It is different from § 5 para 1 No. 1 issue in the cases of sentence 1, No. 2 and 3. You should usually deviating from § 5 para 1, No. 1 in the cases of sentence 1 No. 1 issued. You can, notwithstanding § 5 para 1 No. 1 of the non-person custodial parent a minor, unmarried Germans will be granted if the family community is lived in Germany. § 30 Abs 1 sentence 1 no 1 and 2, Clause 3 and Section 2 Sentence 1 in the cases of sentence 1 No. 1 apply accordingly.

(2) the alien is to be issued is usually a settlement permit if his three years in possession of a residence permit, continues the family unity with the Germans in Germany, no grounds for expulsion and he can interact in a simple way in German. Moreover, the residence permit will be extended as long as the family unity persists.

(3) § § 31 and 35 are subject to the proviso that in the place of the residence permit of the foreigner, the habitual residence of the German in Germany occurs.

(4) For other family members, § 36 shall apply.

(5) The residence permit for employment purposes.

You know nada my man !

I no get your time again... get other stuffs to deal with ...
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 4:45pm On Dec 27, 2012
Markenny: talking about laws in germany,i hope you kwn that germany have 16 states,and those 16 states have different laws about permit and stuff like that,most of the laws you read in the internet is almost old.for exmple...bayern is far worse for permit than baden württemberg. you keep talking about 8 years,iam trying to tell you that,it old laws as for 2011 it have been change,onces you have permit to stay and work in germany,(you have to stay in germany and no one is deproting you as far as the child is not 18 years old)thats is the meaning of this §.(§28 ABS.! satz 1nr.3 aufenthg)



Who told you they are old laws? Where do you live in Germany? Why should one hold a permit and be deported? Do we talk about holding a permit and deportation here?
And who told you i'm getting my info from the internet? Do you even understand yourself?
Now i just realize that you don't even know what we're talking about here... So better jump out the way you jump in...
I don't have your time i repeat... get busy !
Re: Best European Country by Nobody: 8:45pm On Dec 27, 2012
How is it with French law, I have a visa valid till October 2013, with duration of stay for 90 days. I arrived in France November 2012, to get ready for my marriage with my fiance, a French citizen but due to delay in translation of all documents from English to French, I won't be able to meet up with the 90 days duration of stay. Am currently pregnant and expecting my baby 11 days after the expiration of my 90 days duration.

Now my question, is it possible to apply for an extension on duration of stay? Or since my visa validity is until october2013, I don't need an extension?

The Marie said its possible to get my marriage even if my duration of stay elapse but am afraid as I don't wanna get a ban, maybe when I visit Nigeria with my baby,I can't go back to my new family in France.

I work in west Africa, so what are my chances of getting a permit to travel without staying too long in France?
Re: Best European Country by sunnyd4u: 4:15pm On Dec 28, 2012
@Markenny
Please i need your help i have 2years greece Visa but want to live and work in germany, with your experience i want you to please help me how to go about this
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 8:28pm On Dec 28, 2012
sunnyd4u: @Markenny
Please i need your help i have 2years greece Visa but want to live and work in germany, with your experience i want you to please help me how to go about this

What type of visa?
Re: Best European Country by Pro02: 12:39pm On Dec 29, 2012
Markenny you are the bestest. Pls i need details abt that look alike ish



You re mouthed!
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 1:47pm On Dec 29, 2012
Pro02: Markenny you are the bestest. Pls i need details abt that look alike ish



You re mouthed!

If you use any look alike, you will be nicked and convicted. Those things ain't work again. If you try it you're smelling prison and they wont even consider your deportation to be fast track, they will make sure you serve your sentence before putting you in the flight to Nigeria.
Those look alike stuffs are not working anymore as per biometric and data base link has changed everything. If anyone telling you its possible, its capital LIE. Quote me wrong as soon as you get it right.... I was an expert in those field before wink, but not anymore, and mainly it wastes time and risk.... So why not get your documents and apply for your visa normally? wink

Gbam over and out....
Re: Best European Country by topeajis(m): 12:10pm On Jan 06, 2013
Hello. House have applied for masters programme to. About 4 school in germany I have all the requiremnt. And I have a good bachelor result so I hope 2 out of the four schools schoold be able to admit me. But I don't have the money for the bloc account I intend to use. A sponsor which I have someone already. My question is must my sponsor stay in same city to the school where am been admitted to ?
Re: Best European Country by jay3012: 5:00pm On Feb 05, 2013
Hi y'all....pls do anyone here have knowledge bout travelling to switzerland for studies. Wana ask these questions..... Can I travel to other schengen countries wit a swiss student visa....is the swiss embassy lenient wit giving visas.....can intl students work part time in switzerland Pls reply asap tnxx......waiting
Re: Best European Country by vanagon: 7:17pm On Feb 11, 2013
Markenny:
i loved spain,spain is hard man country u can work in apple farm about 2-5euro per hour depend on how fast u are.many nija in spain are too lazy to work in farms.thats the only work u can get if u are illegal in spain.
,hi markenny&other guru's in hse,just stumble on dis topic,was a uk economic migrant b/4,came home for re-documentation,nw thinkin abt europe as in shengen,(spain)was working @ a salvage yard den,pls u av any head's up abt life&living as a hustler in spain.waitin to hear frm u&all other N/L in d hse,pls if u can give d on hand's info,(d Good&d Bad).tanx.
 
 
Re: Best European Country by sunnyd4u: 2:37pm On Feb 22, 2013
@Markenn please sir i need your urgent advice i will be in germany 1st week in April Gods willing but my problem now is that the guy that i was supposed to stay with said he will take me to aduro as a soon as i arrive, but the question now is that is it possible for me to work as aduromy, please your urgent advice will be greatly appreciate
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 3:13pm On Feb 22, 2013
sunnyd4u: @Markenn please sir i need your urgent advice i will be in germany 1st week in April Gods willing but my problem now is that the guy that i was supposed to stay with said he will take me to aduro as a soon as i arrive, but the question now is that is it possible for me to work as aduromy, please your urgent advice will be greatly appreciate


For the first year after arriving in Germany, asylum seekers are not allowed to work. An EU decision is to cut that time to six months. But that's unlikely to change the tough situation for asylum applicants in Germany.

Filling out forms, waiting for authorities and somehow killing time - for asylum seekers in Germany that's a day-to-day experience. Out of the around 130,000 asylum applicants, only 3.7 percent currently have a job, and only one third of those are working full time, according to the federal statistics office.

This is not because they don't want to work - rather, they are not allowed to. At least not in the first 12 months after their arrival in Germany. Then, authorities can - but aren't required to - grant them a work permit. But a new EU guideline is set to change this so that in future, asylum seekers across the EU would be permitted to work after only nine months.

The decision has been approved by all 27 member states.

To answer your question, you're not allowed to work as an Asylum seeker in Germany i believe.

Most asylum applicants hardly have a chance to find a job," asylum seekers are unable to look for a job just anywhere in Germany, as they must remain at their registered place of residence in Germany.
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 3:18pm On Feb 22, 2013
vanagon: ,hi markenny&other guru's in hse,just stumble on dis topic,was a uk economic migrant b/4,came home for re-documentation,nw thinkin abt europe as in shengen,(spain)was working @ a salvage yard den,pls u av any head's up abt life&living as a hustler in spain.waitin to hear frm u&all other N/L in d hse,pls if u can give d on hand's info,(d Good&d Bad).tanx.

I must confess to you that nothing dey happen in Europe again. The worst is if u enter Europe without the right document that will allow you to stay and work there legally, u'll get bleeped. Trust me bro.. Life is like hell in Europe now even America and other countries... The only way u can a bit survive is to have the right documents. Don't let anyone deceive you that if u go Spain or any where in the schengen zone u'll get job or so, u will regret it bro..

Best thing is to get the right document that will allow u to work and live in the country... thats all...
If anyone tell u that u'll get work and live with rest of mind in any European country, pls allow the person to come and face me openly here, so he/she can tell me the section and acts that said so.

Gbammmmmmm
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 3:22pm On Feb 22, 2013
Pro02: Markenny you are the bestest. Pls i need details abt that look alike ish



You re mouthed!

Look alike? U need a look alike?
It is not known as look alike, it is called ''QWP'' QUICKEST WAY TO PRISON

Na your hair dem go count to measure & determine your sentence
Re: Best European Country by topeajis(m): 3:54pm On Feb 22, 2013
dotcom_na_me_na_me:

Look alike? U need a look alike?
It is not known as look alike, it is called ''QWP'' QUICKEST WAY TO PRISON

Na your hair dem go count to measure & determine your sentence


I should be goin to gemany for a study viisa in april goin for my masters and I have a A1 knowlagde in deutsch language cos ma programe s fully taught in englsh. Will be goin to berlin wat advise can you give me about work seaerch. Thanks as I will be waitn for responce
Re: Best European Country by dotcom_na_me_na_me(f): 5:54pm On Feb 22, 2013
topeajis:

I should be goin to gemany for a study viisa in april goin for my masters and I have a A1 knowlagde in deutsch language cos ma programe s fully taught in englsh. Will be goin to berlin wat advise can you give me about work seaerch. Thanks as I will be waitn for responce

Very good question for the right move.

Firstly get yourself familiar with the german jobs search site here http://www.arbeitsagentur.de/

Earning money alongside studying is a way of life for many students in Germany. The latest social survey carried out by the Deutsche Studentenwerke shows that in total around two thirds of all students go to work.
For international students in particular a side job is an important means of subsistence.

If you work too much and not in line with your qualifications, you lengthen the time of study. You should only use lecture-free time for going to work.

The job market for students is getting more and more difficult; jobs are becoming increasingly rarer.

As of August 2012 international students who do not come from the EU or EEA are allowed to work 120 full or 240 half days in a year. To do this they do not need authorisation from the Employment Agency, i.e. the German authorities.
International students who do not come from the EU cannot go self employed or work freelance!

If you want to work more than 120 full or 240 half days you need the approval of the Employment Agency and the Aliens Department. Whether you receive the approval depends on the situation of the job market in your place of study.

In regions with high unemployment you will have little chance of working more than 90 days.
One exception, however, is the occupation of academic or student assistant. As long as your studies are not impaired by it, this work can be carried out for an unlimited period of time. The Aliens Department must still be informed if you wish to work as an academic or student assistant!

If you do not come from the EU or the EEA and have a work placement in Germany it counts as normal work - even if the placement is unpaid! Every day of your work experience will be subtracted from your 120 days.

For example, if you have already worked 120 days you must get authorisation from the Aliens Department and the Federal Employment Agency to be able to do a work placement.

The only exceptions are work placements that are a compulsory part of your studies.

In Germany different places offer side jobs for students. Most regional employment agencies have job opportunities for students. In large university cities, such as Berlin, the Studentenwerk or the students themselves run job agencies.

Often jobs are advertised on the notice boards at the universities. Most university websites and Studentenwerke have a job market on their website. What is more, all regional or local newspapers have an appointments section where vacant positions are advertised.

During the term holidays special rules apply for students.
Jobs taken on during the term holidays are subject to income tax but normally students get back the taxes they have paid at the end of the year via the income tax return.

If the job is carried out only during lecture-free time students do not have to pay any health insurance contributions, even if they work more than 20 hours a week.

During term holidays the obligation to pay contributions towards the state pension may not be applicable: this applies if the employment is limited to a maximum of 2 months or 50 working days per year.

I hope this help?

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