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China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by dipoolowoo: 3:06pm On Sep 04, 2018
By Grant T. Harris

This week, China hosted leaders from across Africa for a summit in Beijing. The last summit was held in December 2015 in Johannesburg, South Africa, where Chinese President Xi Jinping announced $60 billion in funding support for infrastructure development in Africa.

The Forum on China-Africa Cooperation included an eye-popping announcement of billions of dollars more in Chinese financing to build infrastructure across the continent. But these massive loans can come with steep and opaque conditions.

It’s tempting for Americans to think this is not our problem. But as African countries sink deeper and deeper into Beijing’s carefully laid debt trap, the United States could pay a steep cost in reduced cooperation on counterterrorism and job creation.

Chinese debt has become the methamphetamines of infrastructure finance: highly addictive, readily available, and with long-term negative effects that far outweigh any temporary high. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, where China has become the largest provider of bilateral loans. Forty percent of sub-Saharan African countries are already at high risk of debt distress; by having so much debt concentrated in the hands of a single lender, they are dangerously beholden to their supplier.

Why does this matter? Because in Africa and elsewhere, governments have secured massive loans from Beijing using strategic assets—such as oil, minerals, and land rights— as collateral. If borrower nations find themselves unable to repay the loan, China can claim the strategic asset. Sri Lanka recently learned this the hard way and handed over control of the port of Hambantota, giving China a strategic foothold along a busy trade waterway.

According to Professor Brahma Chellaney at the New Delhi-based Center for Policy Research, “several other countries, from Argentina to Namibia to Laos, have been ensnared in a Chinese debt trap, forcing them to confront agonizing choices in order to stave off default.”

While Chinese debt diplomacy may not seem relevant to most Americans, it is a serious threat to US national security. Most directly, China’s crafty negotiations and seizure of strategic assets can limit US influence and access overseas.

For instance, the tiny country of Djibouti is home to the most significant American military base in Africa. Thanks to Chinese loans, Djibouti’s debt-to-GDP ratio surged from 50 to 85 percent between 2014 and 2016. If Djibouti were to default and relinquish the port that resupplies the US base, American military capability in Africa and the Middle East could be seriously threatened.

More broadly, unsustainable levels of debt can destabilize African states, which also compromises American security interests. Over-leveraged governments can get caught in a downward spiral of credit downgrades, reckless economic policies, and reduced spending on social services. With economic stagnation comes fewer opportunities for Africa’s fast-growing and young population. And the toxic brew of economic hopelessness and political disillusionment can drive disaffected youth toward violent extremism. That can threaten Americans abroad and, potentially, even at home.

Finally, China’s debt diplomacy shuts out opportunities for US businesses. Not only do Beijing’s cheap infrastructure loans come with conditions to employ Chinese companies, they also set out technical specifications for projects like high-speed railways and wireless networks in a manner that favours Chinese firms. The combined effect of these efforts “would push the United States away from its current position in the global economy and move China toward the centre,” according to Jonathan Hillman, a fellow at the Center for International and Strategic Studies. China already earns $180 billion annually from its investments in Africa; if its debt diplomacy remains uncontested, it’s likely that even more revenues and jobs will flow to China, instead of the US.

But this outcome is far from inevitable. The US has plenty of good options, but it needs to dramatically step up its game and support alternatives to Beijing’s aggressive finance initiatives. Perhaps most fundamentally, the US needs to focus on boosting African economic growth. Helping African states to strengthen investment climates and economic governance will help them attract more private sector capital and provide more entry points for US companies. A key component is assisting African efforts to increase transparency, so that all the costs and benefits of project finance options are openly known. Fully staffing US embassies and offering more technical assistance to evaluate loan agreements and investment contracts would be a good start.

To date, the Trump Administration’s Africa policy has been adrift, defined more by racial epithets than any cohesive strategy or results. By comparison, China has a clear vision that will yield long-term benefits.

In Africa and around the world, much more needs to be done to confront Chinese debt diplomacy. If not, the US will pay a heavy price in its commercial and national security interests.

Harris is CEO of Harris Africa Partners LLC and advises companies on investing in Africa. He was senior director for Africa at the White House from 2011-2015.

https://www.businesspost.ng/2018/09/04/chinas-billion-dollar-loans-to-africa-why-us-should-be-worried/

10 Likes 1 Share

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by DaniDani(m): 3:38pm On Sep 04, 2018
I like this. USA cannot remain at the center forever. They have ruled and ruined for too long. Roman power, German invasion, and British Colonial Administration etc they reigned and left for others. USA should prepare for China to Mount the center stage

35 Likes 2 Shares

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Teewhy2: 3:44pm On Sep 04, 2018
If borrower nations find themselves unable to repay the loan, China can claim the strategic asset. Sri Lanka recently learned this the hard way and handed over control of the port of Hambantota, giving China a strategic foothold along a busy trade waterway.

This why am a bit worried with people that the president took to the meeting, most of them are after their pockets and what they will eat today they don't care about the state or citizens.
I was expecting him to take along with him business men, this kind of meeting is where Osinbajo also needs to attend has a legal person that can read in between the lines because anything chinese e get as e dey be ooo.

106 Likes 6 Shares

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Adebowhales(m): 3:44pm On Sep 04, 2018
Who do MANNABBQGRILLS no do am well, Sam Sam...
Apart from Masturbating, what else can he do with his hands

2 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by jarvis4: 3:44pm On Sep 04, 2018
Everything comes with a price. There is always a hidden charge

8 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by chloride6: 3:44pm On Sep 04, 2018
Good both of them should court us and outbid themselves in incentives cool

1 Like

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Tallesty1(m): 3:45pm On Sep 04, 2018
DaniDani:
I like this. USA cannot remain at the center forever. They have ruled and ruined for too long. Roman power, German invasion, and British Colonial Administration etc they reigned and left for others. USA should prepare for China to Mount the center stage
Always remember that your country is the grass where this two elephants fight.

64 Likes 2 Shares

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Vocnewsblog(m): 3:45pm On Sep 04, 2018
God bless China for their benevolence.

2 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by superior1: 3:46pm On Sep 04, 2018
Africa and their leaders who with open eyes are walking into second colonialism should be more worried but they do not have any head talkless of thinking brain.

19 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by jarvis4: 3:46pm On Sep 04, 2018
DaniDani:
I like this. USA cannot remain at the center forever. They have ruled and ruined for too long. Roman power, German invasion, and British Colonial Administration etc they reigned and left for others. USA should prepare for China to Mount the center stage
Na story u de yarn

2 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by CROWNWEALTH019(m): 3:47pm On Sep 04, 2018
DaniDani:
I like this. USA cannot remain at the center forever. They have ruled and ruined for too long. Roman power, German invasion, and British Colonial Administration etc they reigned and left for others. USA should prepare for China to Mount the center stage
Average Muslim thinking, yet they want to go to america instead of Saudi

Hypocritical fulls

67 Likes 1 Share

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Nobody: 3:47pm On Sep 04, 2018
Loans that won't be spent judiciously.

Dead weight loan

2 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by akandi4u(m): 3:47pm On Sep 04, 2018
One in debt is indebted to poverty. Out of debt is out of poverty.

4 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by IMASTEX: 3:47pm On Sep 04, 2018
The USA has nothing to fear. They will always have a way around things.

7 Likes 1 Share

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Nobody: 3:48pm On Sep 04, 2018
African nations still remain at a loss.

5 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by olajide8(m): 3:48pm On Sep 04, 2018
dipoolowoo:
By Grant T. Harris

This week, China hosted leaders from across Africa for a summit in Beijing. The last summit was held in December 2015 in Johannesburg, South Africa, where Chinese President Xi Jinping announced $60 billion in funding support for infrastructure development in Africa.

The Forum on China-Africa Cooperation included an eye-popping announcement of billions of dollars more in Chinese financing to build infrastructure across the continent. But these massive loans can come with steep and opaque conditions.

It’s tempting for Americans to think this is not our problem. But as African countries sink deeper and deeper into Beijing’s carefully laid debt trap, the United States could pay a steep cost in reduced cooperation on counterterrorism and job creation.

Chinese debt has become the methamphetamines of infrastructure finance: highly addictive, readily available, and with long-term negative effects that far outweigh any temporary high. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, where China has become the largest provider of bilateral loans. Forty percent of sub-Saharan African countries are already at high risk of debt distress; by having so much debt concentrated in the hands of a single lender, they are dangerously beholden to their supplier.

Why does this matter? Because in Africa and elsewhere, governments have secured massive loans from Beijing using strategic assets—such as oil, minerals, and land rights— as collateral. If borrower nations find themselves unable to repay the loan, China can claim the strategic asset. Sri Lanka recently learned this the hard way and handed over control of the port of Hambantota, giving China a strategic foothold along a busy trade waterway.

According to Professor Brahma Chellaney at the New Delhi-based Center for Policy Research, “several other countries, from Argentina to Namibia to Laos, have been ensnared in a Chinese debt trap, forcing them to confront agonizing choices in order to stave off default.”

While Chinese debt diplomacy may not seem relevant to most Americans, it is a serious threat to US national security. Most directly, China’s crafty negotiations and seizure of strategic assets can limit US influence and access overseas.

For instance, the tiny country of Djibouti is home to the most significant American military base in Africa. Thanks to Chinese loans, Djibouti’s debt-to-GDP ratio surged from 50 to 85 percent between 2014 and 2016. If Djibouti were to default and relinquish the port that resupplies the US base, American military capability in Africa and the Middle East could be seriously threatened.

More broadly, unsustainable levels of debt can destabilize African states, which also compromises American security interests. Over-leveraged governments can get caught in a downward spiral of credit downgrades, reckless economic policies, and reduced spending on social services. With economic stagnation comes fewer opportunities for Africa’s fast-growing and young population. And the toxic brew of economic hopelessness and political disillusionment can drive disaffected youth toward violent extremism. That can threaten Americans abroad and, potentially, even at home.

Finally, China’s debt diplomacy shuts out opportunities for US businesses. Not only do Beijing’s cheap infrastructure loans come with conditions to employ Chinese companies, they also set out technical specifications for projects like high-speed railways and wireless networks in a manner that favours Chinese firms. The combined effect of these efforts “would push the United States away from its current position in the global economy and move China toward the centre,” according to Jonathan Hillman, a fellow at the Center for International and Strategic Studies. China already earns $180 billion annually from its investments in Africa; if its debt diplomacy remains uncontested, it’s likely that even more revenues and jobs will flow to China, instead of the US.

But this outcome is far from inevitable. The US has plenty of good options, but it needs to dramatically step up its game and support alternatives to Beijing’s aggressive finance initiatives. Perhaps most fundamentally, the US needs to focus on boosting African economic growth. Helping African states to strengthen investment climates and economic governance will help them attract more private sector capital and provide more entry points for US companies. A key component is assisting African efforts to increase transparency, so that all the costs and benefits of project finance options are openly known. Fully staffing US embassies and offering more technical assistance to evaluate loan agreements and investment contracts would be a good start.

To date, the Trump Administration’s Africa policy has been adrift, defined more by racial epithets than any cohesive strategy or results. By comparison, China has a clear vision that will yield long-term benefits.

In Africa and around the world, much more needs to be done to confront Chinese debt diplomacy. If not, the US will pay a heavy price in its commercial and national security interests.

Harris is CEO of Harris Africa Partners LLC and advises companies on investing in Africa. He was senior director for Africa at the White House from 2011-2015.

https://www.businesspost.ng/2018/09/04/chinas-billion-dollar-loans-to-africa-why-us-should-be-worried/

I see a scenario where the wealth of America would contract- and a possibility that if a recession should happen again in america- there would be no country that would absorb the effects - and this would definitely lead to the collapse of the American economy - no matter the amount of economist they have they would be done for- what a shame- ottoman empire fell- great Egyptian empire collapsed - and trump moved America to the point of where it would soon collapse- where as he has investments outside america- *he wants to become richer then america*

3 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Nobody: 3:49pm On Sep 04, 2018
Thank you China for your support, we love you.

1 Like

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Dpharisee: 3:49pm On Sep 04, 2018
US own is always counter terrorism, poverty breeds terrorism, if people are rich they wont want to become suicide bombers.
China is helping Africa to build infrastructure, schools and healthcare while America gives 'aid' in form of military hardware.
Show me a road built with US aid in Nigeria.

21 Likes 1 Share

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Walehelt(m): 3:49pm On Sep 04, 2018
how is this good news for my country?

2 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by yahoodotcom: 3:50pm On Sep 04, 2018
dipoolowoo:
By Grant T. Harris

This week, China hosted leaders from across Africa for a summit in Beijing. The last summit was held in December 2015 in Johannesburg, South Africa, where Chinese President Xi Jinping announced $60 billion in funding support for infrastructure development in Africa.

The Forum on China-Africa Cooperation included an eye-popping announcement of billions of dollars more in Chinese financing to build infrastructure across the continent. But these massive loans can come with steep and opaque conditions.

It’s tempting for Americans to think this is not our problem. But as African countries sink deeper and deeper into Beijing’s carefully laid debt trap, the United States could pay a steep cost in reduced cooperation on counterterrorism and job creation.

Chinese debt has become the methamphetamines of infrastructure finance: highly addictive, readily available, and with long-term negative effects that far outweigh any temporary high. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, where China has become the largest provider of bilateral loans. Forty percent of sub-Saharan African countries are already at high risk of debt distress; by having so much debt concentrated in the hands of a single lender, they are dangerously beholden to their supplier.

Why does this matter? Because in Africa and elsewhere, governments have secured massive loans from Beijing using strategic assets—such as oil, minerals, and land rights— as collateral. If borrower nations find themselves unable to repay the loan, China can claim the strategic asset. Sri Lanka recently learned this the hard way and handed over control of the port of Hambantota, giving China a strategic foothold along a busy trade waterway.

According to Professor Brahma Chellaney at the New Delhi-based Center for Policy Research, “several other countries, from Argentina to Namibia to Laos, have been ensnared in a Chinese debt trap, forcing them to confront agonizing choices in order to stave off default.”

While Chinese debt diplomacy may not seem relevant to most Americans, it is a serious threat to US national security. Most directly, China’s crafty negotiations and seizure of strategic assets can limit US influence and access overseas.

For instance, the tiny country of Djibouti is home to the most significant American military base in Africa. Thanks to Chinese loans, Djibouti’s debt-to-GDP ratio surged from 50 to 85 percent between 2014 and 2016. If Djibouti were to default and relinquish the port that resupplies the US base, American military capability in Africa and the Middle East could be seriously threatened.

More broadly, unsustainable levels of debt can destabilize African states, which also compromises American security interests. Over-leveraged governments can get caught in a downward spiral of credit downgrades, reckless economic policies, and reduced spending on social services. With economic stagnation comes fewer opportunities for Africa’s fast-growing and young population. And the toxic brew of economic hopelessness and political disillusionment can drive disaffected youth toward violent extremism. That can threaten Americans abroad and, potentially, even at home.

Finally, China’s debt diplomacy shuts out opportunities for US businesses. Not only do Beijing’s cheap infrastructure loans come with conditions to employ Chinese companies, they also set out technical specifications for projects like high-speed railways and wireless networks in a manner that favours Chinese firms. The combined effect of these efforts “would push the United States away from its current position in the global economy and move China toward the centre,” according to Jonathan Hillman, a fellow at the Center for International and Strategic Studies. China already earns $180 billion annually from its investments in Africa; if its debt diplomacy remains uncontested, it’s likely that even more revenues and jobs will flow to China, instead of the US.

But this outcome is far from inevitable. The US has plenty of good options, but it needs to dramatically step up its game and support alternatives to Beijing’s aggressive finance initiatives. Perhaps most fundamentally, the US needs to focus on boosting African economic growth. Helping African states to strengthen investment climates and economic governance will help them attract more private sector capital and provide more entry points for US companies. A key component is assisting African efforts to increase transparency, so that all the costs and benefits of project finance options are openly known. Fully staffing US embassies and offering more technical assistance to evaluate loan agreements and investment contracts would be a good start.

To date, the Trump Administration’s Africa policy has been adrift, defined more by racial epithets than any cohesive strategy or results. By comparison, China has a clear vision that will yield long-term benefits.

In Africa and around the world, much more needs to be done to confront Chinese debt diplomacy. If not, the US will pay a heavy price in its commercial and national security interests.

Harris is CEO of Harris Africa Partners LLC and advises companies on investing in Africa. He was senior director for Africa at the White House from 2011-2015.

https://www.businesspost.ng/2018/09/04/chinas-billion-dollar-loans-to-africa-why-us-should-be-worried/
Loan is in dollar not jpy
Why would usa be worried?
No place like usa
Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by nabegibeg: 3:50pm On Sep 04, 2018
dipoolowoo:
By Grant T. Harris

This week, China hosted leaders from across Africa for a summit in Beijing. The last summit was held in December 2015 in Johannesburg, South Africa, where Chinese President Xi Jinping announced $60 billion in funding support for infrastructure development in Africa.

The Forum on China-Africa Cooperation included an eye-popping announcement of billions of dollars more in Chinese financing to build infrastructure across the continent. But these massive loans can come with steep and opaque conditions.

It’s tempting for Americans to think this is not our problem. But as African countries sink deeper and deeper into Beijing’s carefully laid debt trap, the United States could pay a steep cost in reduced cooperation on counterterrorism and job creation.

Chinese debt has become the methamphetamines of infrastructure finance: highly addictive, readily available, and with long-term negative effects that far outweigh any temporary high. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, where China has become the largest provider of bilateral loans. Forty percent of sub-Saharan African countries are already at high risk of debt distress; by having so much debt concentrated in the hands of a single lender, they are dangerously beholden to their supplier.

Why does this matter? Because in Africa and elsewhere, governments have secured massive loans from Beijing using strategic assets—such as oil, minerals, and land rights— as collateral. If borrower nations find themselves unable to repay the loan, China can claim the strategic asset. Sri Lanka recently learned this the hard way and handed over control of the port of Hambantota, giving China a strategic foothold along a busy trade waterway.

According to Professor Brahma Chellaney at the New Delhi-based Center for Policy Research, “several other countries, from Argentina to Namibia to Laos, have been ensnared in a Chinese debt trap, forcing them to confront agonizing choices in order to stave off default.”

While Chinese debt diplomacy may not seem relevant to most Americans, it is a serious threat to US national security. Most directly, China’s crafty negotiations and seizure of strategic assets can limit US influence and access overseas.

For instance, the tiny country of Djibouti is home to the most significant American military base in Africa. Thanks to Chinese loans, Djibouti’s debt-to-GDP ratio surged from 50 to 85 percent between 2014 and 2016. If Djibouti were to default and relinquish the port that resupplies the US base, American military capability in Africa and the Middle East could be seriously threatened.

More broadly, unsustainable levels of debt can destabilize African states, which also compromises American security interests. Over-leveraged governments can get caught in a downward spiral of credit downgrades, reckless economic policies, and reduced spending on social services. With economic stagnation comes fewer opportunities for Africa’s fast-growing and young population. And the toxic brew of economic hopelessness and political disillusionment can drive disaffected youth toward violent extremism. That can threaten Americans abroad and, potentially, even at home.

Finally, China’s debt diplomacy shuts out opportunities for US businesses. Not only do Beijing’s cheap infrastructure loans come with conditions to employ Chinese companies, they also set out technical specifications for projects like high-speed railways and wireless networks in a manner that favours Chinese firms. The combined effect of these efforts “would push the United States away from its current position in the global economy and move China toward the centre,” according to Jonathan Hillman, a fellow at the Center for International and Strategic Studies. China already earns $180 billion annually from its investments in Africa; if its debt diplomacy remains uncontested, it’s likely that even more revenues and jobs will flow to China, instead of the US.

But this outcome is far from inevitable. The US has plenty of good options, but it needs to dramatically step up its game and support alternatives to Beijing’s aggressive finance initiatives. Perhaps most fundamentally, the US needs to focus on boosting African economic growth. Helping African states to strengthen investment climates and economic governance will help them attract more private sector capital and provide more entry points for US companies. A key component is assisting African efforts to increase transparency, so that all the costs and benefits of project finance options are openly known. Fully staffing US embassies and offering more technical assistance to evaluate loan agreements and investment contracts would be a good start.

To date, the Trump Administration’s Africa policy has been adrift, defined more by racial epithets than any cohesive strategy or results. By comparison, China has a clear vision that will yield long-term benefits.

In Africa and around the world, much more needs to be done to confront Chinese debt diplomacy. If not, the US will pay a heavy price in its commercial and national security interests.

Harris is CEO of Harris Africa Partners LLC and advises companies on investing in Africa. He was senior director for Africa at the White House from 2011-2015.

https://www.businesspost.ng/2018/09/04/chinas-billion-dollar-loans-to-africa-why-us-should-be-worried/

Why should US be worried

Who is spending the money grin grin grin

8 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by uniqUN(m): 3:50pm On Sep 04, 2018
Economic imperialism if our "borrowers" do not use these funds wisely
Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by nextstep(m): 3:50pm On Sep 04, 2018
Oh, I understand... this is a US-centric fear of Chinese dominance in trade with Africa.

They didn't complain when they were making all those loans in the 70's and 80's via IMF and World Bank that crippled most African economies until 2000's. They didn't complain when the money was used to buy their own products, with interested paid on top. Now that their lunch is being threatened, they're pointing out the dangers of loans...

Chinese entrepreneurs are investing heavily in Africa, hiring labour and building infrastructure. They are also a cheaper source of goods and machinery that African entrepreneurs are buying and using to boost our economy.

Around the world the USA is retreating - insulting friends and allies all the way - and China is quietly stepping in to fill those shoes, making deals with Europe, with Japan, with the rest of Asia, and with Africa. No dogma or imposing their views, just doing business.

13 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by FisifunKododada: 3:50pm On Sep 04, 2018
How about why Africa and Africans should also be worried
Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by ElectroLyte: 3:51pm On Sep 04, 2018
Adebowhales:
Who do MANNABBQGRILLS no do am well, Sam Sam...
Apart from Masturbating, what else can he do with his hands

Grill some Dead Animal, we call that Ise-Owo, Hand work
Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Durchmann(m): 3:51pm On Sep 04, 2018
DaniDani:
I like this. USA cannot remain at the center forever. They have ruled and ruined for too long. Roman power, German invasion, and British Colonial Administration etc they reigned and left for others. USA should prepare for China to Mount the center stage

Be careful what you wish for.
There's no such thing as free lunch.

7 Likes 1 Share

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Austema(m): 3:51pm On Sep 04, 2018
They will collect this loan, at the end Buhari himself will divert it. #Shithole country
Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by lastempero: 3:54pm On Sep 04, 2018
Us have nothing to worry about
Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by Nobody: 3:54pm On Sep 04, 2018
And to foolish African leaders, will they make judicious use the loan

A borrower is a slave to the lender, you know.

2 Likes

Re: China's Billion Dollar Loans To Africa: Why US Should Be Worried by rockastar: 3:55pm On Sep 04, 2018
Wow

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