Nairaland Forum

Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / Login / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 1259161 members, 1700214 topics. Date: Friday, 24 October 2014 at 09:33 AM

The Fate Of Nigerian Writers - Literature - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Entertainment / Literature / The Fate Of Nigerian Writers (3409 Views)

My Life,my Fate / Blogs Of Famous Nigerian Writers/Authors / Many Nigerian Writers Are Good, But We Don't Read (1) (2) (3) (4)

(0) (1) (2) (Reply) (Go Down)

The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by goldenbrown: 10:14pm On Dec 21, 2012
Which way Nigeria literature? Guess writing has become a medium and strategy for another Civil war in Nigeria. For instance,Niger Delta Authors are found of writing Angry books.. First they lament the plight of their homeland and devasted environments caused by Oil companies. Its not bad writing about your Environment but writers should bring these settings to a limit. For instance I read an excerpt of a Novel tittled "THE ELEME BOY" written by a young writer christened Jonah Okpabi. Its a good book to read but I view that book as an authobiography and a direct attack on the Government and Oil Companies. I think writers of this generation should have gone beyond the extent of making much emphasy to their immediate environment in what they claimed to be fiction. The same is said of writers from the East who think the only way of restoring their lost world is by publishing books that is incapable of standing the test of Truth and Time. What about writers from the West whose literary works is a direct attack on their Northern counterparts. On the part of the North, I think writers like Yusuf, Usman etc should be off from the literary scene. What is the fate of Nigerian Writers?

2 Likes

Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 7:28am On Dec 22, 2012
What is wrong with a work of literature reflecting the society the authors live in? Aint there a reason literature is defined as a mirror of life. Those are the only novels I read.

If what you mean is that, Nigerian authors concentrate on only writing novels where they get to address ills in the society, then I agree with you. You rarely get any romance or crime fiction writers. I see them on NL, but for some reason, they never publish.

High time we got a Nigerian Dan Brown or Sidney Sheldon, maybe his name would be Mynd44tongue Or a Nigerian Dannielle steel whose name would be Omolola tongue

1 Like

Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Mynd44: 8:32am On Dec 22, 2012
Nigeria has been influenced by religion and culture and so it's writers, film makers, music(until recently) tend to make creative art along that lane.

I don't read Nigerian novels again cos it is filled with poo. Same old crap and no changing. This comes as a result of them wanting to pass a message with their movies and books.

I have heard of folks read a book and say they learnt nothing from that book or see a movie and start asking what the moral is.

We need to understand that not all works of creative art needs to pass a message about good winning over evil. Sometimes, we just want to be entertained and find something to keep us busy. If I want a sermon, I will go to church and not search inside the pages of a book for that.

It is the environment we live and since the market dictates what is produced, most people involved in creative art want to give the people what they want so to speak/writetonguetonguetongue

we can change this though. I have met writers and film makers who are tired of the present situation but they are of the new generations but the people who buy creative art works are of the old generation.

The dinosaurs are going extinct

3 Likes

Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by laykhorn(m): 9:11am On Dec 22, 2012
Diffrent people and their diffrent perspective. I agree with mynd on our diffrences. You dont want to write to make others feel good and hurt yourself. I think we are all as evasive as ever. We're all tryin to make subtle writings that most of the time elude the truth, defending and consoling our-sorry-selves. Sometimes, I wish I could expunge our diffrences. Until that happens, virtually evry1 is not ready to hit the nail on the head.. Just manipulating and parabulating in our insincerity. Thanks
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by sigmundfreud(m): 9:24am On Dec 22, 2012
We write for different reasons. Nigerian writers in recent times, I think, write with eye focusd on a prize!(commonwealth, NLNG, etc.) I think we have become stereotyped, almost predictable...
But in their defence, these stories sell. The world want to read about injustice in NigerDelta; the Biafran experience; the poverty stricken land; the emerging voices of the slums of the 'third world'...
We cant feel them or like it...its what we live everyday!
Thats why the English classics, Greek mythlogy or American civilization appeals to me.

Good writers reflects their world, the Better ones use them and the Best just create a new world. We get the message all the same.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 9:41am On Dec 22, 2012
sigmundfreud: We write for different reasons. Nigerian writers in recent times, I think, write with eye focusd on a prize!(commonwealth, NLNG, etc.) I think we have become stereotyped, almost predictable...
@bolded! I agree! All nigerian stories always have the same backbone now. Its as if nobody wants to test troubled and unexplored waters, they all want to be on the safe side.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 11:20am On Dec 22, 2012
Mynd_44: Nigeria has been influenced by religion and culture and so it's writers, film makers, music(until recently) tend to make creative art along that lane.

I don't read Nigerian novels again cos it is filled with poo. Same old crap and no changing. This comes as a result of them wanting to pass a message with their movies and books.

I have heard of folks read a book and say they learnt nothing from that book or see a movie and start asking what the moral is.

We need to understand that not all works of creative art needs to pass a message about good winning over evil. Sometimes, we just want to be entertained and find something to keep us busy. If I want a sermon, I will go to church and not search inside the pages of a book for that.

It is the environment we live and since the market dictates what is produced, most people involved in creative art want to give the people what they want so to speak/writetonguetonguetongue

we can change this though. I have met writers and film makers who are tired of the present situation but they are of the new generations but the people who buy creative art works are of the old generation.

The dinosaurs are going extinct

yeah I agree with you that not all works of creative arts need to send a message, but I disagree when you say it is only the old generation who patronise these works of art. If you start following writers on facebook you would see an amazing number of young people who want to read, and what's even more amazing is that most of them want to read genres that no one is writing in Nigeria yet.

I think the first author who takes up genres like this, and dedicates time and effort to it, would be able to make a good living out of it. These days everyone is talking about it, but no one is actually doing it.

1 Like

Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Mynd44: 11:27am On Dec 22, 2012
^^
I made some generalizations there I agree. I actually meant a large percentage
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 11:28am On Dec 22, 2012
breathing:

yeah I agree with you that not all works of creative arts need to send a message, but I disagree when you say it is only the old generation who patronise these works of art. If you start following writers on facebook you would see an amazing number of young people who want to read, and what's even more amazing is that most of them want to read genres that no one is writing in Nigeria yet.

I think the first author who takes up genres like this, and dedicates time and effort to it, would be able to make a good living out of it.[b] These days everyone is talking about it, but no one is actually doing it.
@Bolded Well Yes! I must agree with you, When I wrote African Nerd, to be sincere, I didnt expect any likers, I thought Nigerians were just after the romantic and village setting stuff. But @ the second bolded, I av never seen anyone who wrote a story that deviated thta has deviated from village folklore and romance and stuff. I think thats why I even want to write my own stories.
In short I think that the current state of Nigerian Stories is getting too Old. We need new blood. I am waiting for a writer that will bring sci fic and mythology into writing. Not just the ones that will come and cry about government and the village life and love and normal everyday life. I thinks thats what we all want. Someone who will take that bold step and challenge the norm. undecided
grin grin grin grin
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Mynd44: 11:32am On Dec 22, 2012
Redmosquito:
@Bolded Well Yes! I must agree with you, When I wrote African Nerd, to be sincere, I didnt expect any likers, I thought Nigerians were just after the romantic and village setting stuff. But @ the second bolded, I av never seen anyone who wrote a story that deviated thta has deviated from village folklore and romance and stuff. I think thats why I even want to write my own stories.
In short I think that the current state of Nigerian Stories is getting too Old. We need new blood. I am waiting for a writer that will bring sci fic and mythology into writing. Not just the ones that will come and cry about government and the village life and love and normal everyday life. I thinks thats what we all want. Someone who will take that bold step and challenge the norm. undecided
grin grin grin grin
Must we wait? Your book has a great setting and is great. Such stories should be encouraged and from there, a turn around can be acheived
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 11:38am On Dec 22, 2012
Mynd_44:
Must we wait? Your book has a great setting and is great. Such stories should be encouraged and from there, a turn around can be acheived
Well! Both our stories are unsual! And they draw their crowd! We might just be the first few to break the Nigerian norm! undecided
grin grin grin grin
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 11:38am On Dec 22, 2012
sigmundfreud: We write for different reasons. Nigerian writers in recent times, I think, write with eye focusd on a prize!(commonwealth, NLNG, etc.) I think we have become stereotyped, almost predictable...
But in their defence, these stories sell. The world want to read about injustice in NigerDelta; the Biafran experience; the poverty stricken land; the emerging voices of the slums of the 'third world'...
We cant feel them or like it...its what we live everyday!
Thats why the English classics, Greek mythlogy or American civilization appeals to me.

Good writers reflects their world, the Better ones use them and the Best just create a new world. We get the message all the same.

I agree with this. They write for the prizes cuz that's almost the only way to make money as a Nigerian writer. People don't really buy the books.

But as for the bolded, I'd like to say that I 'feel Nigerian literature and I like it' even though some of it is what I live everyday. So you shouldn't generalize.

I think the problem is that Nigerian pupils are not made to read enough literature. They should be made to read these things right from primary school.

Most young people who condemn Nigerian literature still think of Nigerian literature as only the thrash sold in roadside bookshops, they are not aware of people like Chika Unigwe, Jude Dibia, Eghosa Imasuen, Helon Habila and the rest of them. Atleast now most young Nigerians know and like Chimamanda cuz her 'purple hibiscus' was introduced into secondary school curriculum.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by superbloke(m): 11:40am On Dec 22, 2012
Redmosquito:
@Bolded Well Yes! I must agree with you, When I wrote African Nerd, to be sincere, I didnt expect any likers, I thought Nigerians were just after the romantic and village setting stuff. But @ the second bolded, I av never seen anyone who wrote a story that deviated thta has deviated from village folklore and romance and stuff. I think thats why I even want to write my own stories.
In short I think that the current state of Nigerian Stories is getting too Old. We need new blood. [b]I am waiting for a writer that will bring sci fic and mythology into writing
. Not just the ones that will come and cry about government and the village life and love and normal everyday life. I thinks thats what we all want. Someone who will take that bold step and challenge the norm. undecided
grin grin grin grin [/b]
Can't wait for that.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 11:43am On Dec 22, 2012
breathing:

I agree with this. They write for the prizes cuz that's almost the only way to make money as a Nigerian writer. People don't really buy the books.

But as for the bolded, I'd like to say that I 'feel Nigerian literature and I like it' even though some of it is what I live everyday. So you shouldn't generalize.

I think the problem is that Nigerian pupils are not made to read enough literature. They should be made to read these things right from primary school.

Most young people who condemn Nigerian literature still think of Nigerian literature as only the thrash sold in roadside bookshops, they are not aware of people like Chika Unigwe, Jude Dibia, Eghosa Imasuen, Helon Habila and the rest of them. Atleast now most young Nigerians know and like Chimamanda cuz her 'purple hibiscus' was introduced into secondary school curriculum.

I dont know any of these people! And the only reason I know Chimamada is because her book is sold online, as in soft copy. Thats one thing new generation writers have to understand. Its not just about writing stories, its about getting the stories to the people that will read it, the new generation.
We dont buy books anymore, at least not hard copy. The world is going cyber, if u want to advertise a book to people like me, then do so on the internet, that is where we now meet! grin grin grin
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 11:43am On Dec 22, 2012
breathing:

I agree with this. They write for the prizes cuz that's almost the only way to make money as a Nigerian writer. People don't really buy the books.

But as for the bolded, I'd like to say that I 'feel Nigerian literature and I like it' even though some of it is what I live everyday. So you shouldn't generalize.

I think the problem is that Nigerian pupils are not made to read enough literature. They should be made to read these things right from primary school.

Most young people who condemn Nigerian literature still think of Nigerian literature as only the thrash sold in roadside bookshops, they are not aware of people like Chika Unigwe, Jude Dibia, Eghosa Imasuen, Helon Habila and the rest of them. Atleast now most young Nigerians know and like Chimamanda cuz her 'purple hibiscus' was introduced into secondary school curriculum.

I dont know any of these people! And the only reason I know Chimamada is because her book is sold online, as in soft copy. Thats one thing new generation writers have to understand. Its not just about writing stories, its about getting the stories to the people that will read it, the new generation.
We dont buy books anymore, at least not hard copy. The world is going cyber, if u want to advertise a book to people like me, then do so on the internet, that is where we now meet! grin grin grin
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 11:44am On Dec 22, 2012
superbloke:
Can't wait for that.
I cant wait to write grin grin
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 11:50am On Dec 22, 2012
So how come everyone is waiting when we all can't wait.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by sigmundfreud(m): 12:00pm On Dec 22, 2012
@breathing..noted. One shd not generalize but that might explain why the books dont sell.
The other is that the young ones dont read now!
Am not (that) old...but I was seen as weird growing up cos I was always with a novel/book. Perhaps it was a welcomed escape from reality then but the options/distractions now are immense.
I didnt grow up with 24hr TV or internet...no series, reality TV or talent show, yes! Talent show. Now all I see are kids trying to rap, dropping their pants in-a-Davido-look-alike!
I didnt have that.
I had books...and till date I am grateful for those formative years.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Mynd44: 12:24pm On Dec 22, 2012
breathing: So how come everyone is waiting when we all can't wait.
Waiting is what got us in this mess. I refuse to.

I will just keep putting my crap out there(even when religious folks look at me sideways). Writers of unusual works are mostly criticised by society. I know cos someone questioned my "christianity" because of 'burning cold' and in the case of 'Fear' forget, if I was not so uncaring.............

These is what some writers face and hence they drop such stories. Personally, I prefer creating a separate world when writing

1 Like

 
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by sigmundfreud(m): 12:35pm On Dec 22, 2012
Redmosquito:
I dont know any of these people! And the only reason I know Chimamada is because her book is sold online, as in soft copy. Thats one thing new generation writers have to understand. Its not just about writing stories, its about getting the stories to the people that will read it, the new generation.
We dont buy books anymore, at least not hard copy. The world is going cyber, if u want to advertise a book to people like me, then do so on the internet, that is where we now meet! grin grin grin
Jude Dibia's Walking with Shadows was quite bold..., Helon Habila, I av known from Hints magazine. Must have read abt others somewhere.
Their books are online too...not only Adiche.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 12:45pm On Dec 22, 2012
sigmundfreud:
Jude Dibia's Walking with Shadows was quite bold..., Helon Habila, I av known from Hints magazine. Must have read abt others somewhere.
Their books are online too...not only Adiche.

I can bet that none had as much cyber popularity as chim. But then what do I know? I go to the bookstores looking for unusual nigerian stories, and I never find them.
How then will I look for it online, when I expect it to look for me?
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by sigmundfreud(m): 12:51pm On Dec 22, 2012
Redmosquito:

I can bet that none had as much cyber popularity as chim. But then what do I know? I go to the bookstores looking for unusual nigerian stories, and I never find them.
How then will I look for it online, when I expect it to look for me?
Walking with Shadows is unusual.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by sholay2011(m): 12:56pm On Dec 22, 2012
breathing:

yeah I agree with you that not all works of creative arts need to send a message, but I disagree when you say it is only the old generation who patronise these works of art. If you start following writers on facebook you would see an amazing number of young people who want to read, and what's even more amazing is that most of them want to read
genres that no one is writing in Nigeria yet.
Tnx very much for this post. You may nt know that it has encouraged me to go ahead wiv d publishing of my book entitled- 'Louder'. It's of d drama genre. I noticed almost every popular writer of today writes in prose nd I've always been skeptical about the success of my book. It has a gud storyline which luckily is nt the usual 'civil war' story background dat dt OP emphasized. Tnx for d post.

I think the first author who takes up genres like this, and dedicates time and effort to it, would be able to make a good living out of it. These days everyone is talking about it, but no one is actually doing it.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by sholay2011(m): 12:58pm On Dec 22, 2012
breathing:

yeah I agree with you that not all works of creative arts need to send a message, but I disagree when you say it is only the old generation who patronise these works of art. If you start following writers on facebook you would see an amazing number of young people who want to read, and what's even more amazing is that most of them want to read
genres that no one is writing in Nigeria yet.







Tnx very much for this post. You may nt know that it has encouraged me to go ahead wiv d publishing of my book entitled- 'Louder'. It's of d drama genre. I noticed almost every popular writer of today writes in prose nd I've always been skeptical about the success of my book. It has a gud storyline which luckily is nt the usual 'civil war' story background dat dt OP emphasized. Tnx for d post.

I think the first author who takes up genres like this, and dedicates time and effort to it, would be able to make a good living out of it. These days everyone is talking about it, but no one is actually doing it.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by Redmosquito(m): 1:04pm On Dec 22, 2012
sigmundfreud:
Walking with Shadows is unusual.
what genre is it? Does it hold mysticsm, mythology, sci-fi? Not just sadness and cryin and government and village
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by nollywood20: 1:40pm On Dec 22, 2012
@Poster, only a couple of Nigerian writers are engaged in what you alleged.
More of us are sanguine and producing the best literary works than pop fiction since Cyprian Ekwensi’s People of the City, which was the first Nigerian novel in standard English published in 1954 before Chinua Achebe's all time classic Things Fall Apart was published in 1958.

All humans, including writers have four temperaments responsible for their moods, lifestyles and pursuits in the world.
Sanguine (pleasure-seeking and sociable), choleric (ambitious and leader-like), melancholic (introverted and thoughtful), and phlegmatic (relaxed and quiet). And Nigerian writers have been busy expressing themselves and their environments in these four different temperaments.

1 Like

Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 1:46pm On Dec 22, 2012
Redmosquito:
what genre is it? Does it hold mysticsm, mythology, sci-fi? Not just sadness and cryin and government and village

I haven't read it but from reviews I know it doesn't hold any of the things you asked for. Try reading it sha, it holds sadness in a cool way, all of them do. I think one of the teams was homosexuality in Nigeria. But first, google short stories by Chimamanda, Jude Dibia and Chika Unigwe, and use them as a test case, the short stories are available free online. If you like the short stories, then you would love the books.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 1:50pm On Dec 22, 2012
nollywood20: @Poster, only a couple of Nigerian writers are engaged in what you alleged.
More of us are sanguine and producing the best literary works than pop fiction since Cyprian Ekwensi’s People of the City, which was the first Nigerian novel in standard English published in 1954 before Chinua Achebe's all time classic Things Fall Apart was published in 1958.

All humans, including writers have four temperaments responsible for their moods, lifestyles and pursuits in the world.
Sanguine (pleasure-seeking and sociable), choleric (ambitious and leader-like), melancholic (introverted and thoughtful), and phlegmatic (relaxed and quiet). And Nigerian writers have been busy expressing themselves and their environments in these four different temperaments.


Hehe, this is a new one. Interesting. Please can you list some contemporary SANGUINE Nigerian literature grin. Infact if possible, just list about two contemporary books under each of the four temperaments.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 1:53pm On Dec 22, 2012
Redmosquito:

I can bet that none had as much cyber popularity as chim. But then what do I know? I go to the bookstores looking for unusual nigerian stories, and I never find them.
How then will I look for it online, when I expect it to look for me?

Yeah, that's another thing, most of them don't get very much publicity. Look how everyone wants to read Chinua Achebe's TWAC cuz of all the talk about it.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 1:55pm On Dec 22, 2012
Mynd_44:
Waiting is what got us in this mess. I refuse to.

I will just keep putting my crap out there(even when religious folks look at me sideways). Writers of unusual works are mostly criticised by society. I know cos someone questioned my "christianity" because of 'burning cold' and in the case of 'Fear' forget, if I was not so uncaring.............

These is what some writers face and hence they drop such stories. Personally, I prefer creating a separate world when writing

Personally I prefer reading about the world I live in, maybe that makes me a realist grin but there are more readers for your kinda writing than mine.
Re: The Fate Of Nigerian Writers by breathing(f): 1:58pm On Dec 22, 2012
[quote author=sholay2011][/quote]

You know there was Nigerian drama in the past, my friend was lamenting on facebook the other day, that the drama genre is dead. Maybe you would be the one to revive it for him. But I have been wondering, has drama just gone 'old school' or we just don't have drama writers?

(0) (1) (2) (Reply)

First Chapter Of A Book I Just Started: Critique Plzzzz / 6 Missed Calls!!!! A Must Read! / Reject - A Suspence/thriller

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2014 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See Nairalist and How To Advertise. 370
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.