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Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? - Business (1) - Nairaland

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Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by gmcln(m): 7:47pm On Apr 12, 2007
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Horus(m): 9:28pm On Apr 12, 2007
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Rlst84sale(m): 10:23pm On Apr 12, 2007
@Brymore,

Leave your email address, u never know that's how the biggest telephone company started in America many years ago. The guy that wrote the first Ms DOS was hobbyist program writer as well. Please leave your email address on your reply.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by TaxMan(m): 11:51pm On Apr 12, 2007
@ Adechuks

Please can you post the contacts of the service provider who gave you the prices you quoted. Secondly, has he responded to your inquiry as to the make of his products? Where you also able to get further discounts for this products?
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by MP007(m): 9:43am On Apr 13, 2007
govt aint interested in somein that with no generate money for their pocket, there is no excuse to give when there power outage when using solar remember? no where to hide, they cant , and they woundnt
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by omonla6(m): 12:06pm On Apr 13, 2007
brymore!

You know there are many people there selling generators and that is where they make a living from. If we want to start using solar in Naija, we all have to fight for it because solar is very good for every home. Make una help us ooooo jare! Many of us will patronise you.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Brymore(m): 12:32pm On Apr 13, 2007
@ Omo_nla

Thanks for the encouragement, I'm have actually built a few ac to dc inverter that supplies up to 3kv on a 180 amp car battery. My major problem had always being having to rely on PHCN or a generator to charge the batteries when they run down. So I felt, why not build a solar panel with the function of charging the battery, while the inverter supplies the power needed.

As I earlier said, I would not mind if anyone can post or send me a circuit diagram for a solar panel, we will then work out how to locally manufacture the parts locally.

#Candid Submission#
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Brymore(m): 12:37pm On Apr 13, 2007
My email addy is trymorewithbrymore@yahoo.com.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by gmcln(m): 6:20pm On Apr 13, 2007
Brymore

Try to get a copy of this book: "BUILD YOUROWN SOLAR PANEL"
by Phillip J Hurley.
http://www.goodideacreative.com/solarpanel.html
If you have problem getting a copy in Nigeria, let me known
Iam in Washingtin DC I may be of help.
God bless.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Chionyins(m): 6:37pm On Apr 13, 2007
Would be interesting if one can get something locally.
I wont know also how much is the technolgy if one was to get it from abroadjust wondering is there any restriction on solar energy as in foireign investment
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Seun(m): 6:53pm On Apr 13, 2007
Hmmm. There are ways to take advantage of solar power without converting it into electricity: Technologies
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Rlst84sale(m): 12:51am On Apr 14, 2007
@Brymore, Gmcln

I'm going to get some fellows that are electrical engineers that are my friends here in the States to get on it. I will send you an email next week for more contact details.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Brymore(m): 8:18pm On Apr 14, 2007
Thanks Rlst84sale, gmcln and Seun

I'm trying to work around getting the book "BUILD YOUR OWN SOLAR PANEL", but I will not mind any form of assistance I can get.

#Candid Submission#
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by solarrate: 10:49pm On Apr 23, 2007
Here's a fine place to start

http://www.rain.org/~philfear/how2solar.html
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Nobody: 6:08pm On Oct 17, 2007
We are all just shouting solar energy
let's try and be more feasible, solar power is nothing for now
it has an efficiency of 15-25% compared to other ways of generating electricity

If the efficiency can be improved by lets say 45% by developing new efficient solar cells we can now consider it as a viable way of generating cool
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by lyfe(m): 11:31pm On Nov 22, 2007
Solar power is the form of power supply that we need for the future because it is sustainable and 100% environmentally friendly unlike hydro-power which is epileptic in dry season and prone to natural disaster like flooding in the rainy season when the dam is filled and the water cannot be accomodated or controlled, i still don't see the reason why we should still encourage the use of generator which is not sustainable in terms of maintenance and fuelling, also typical source of pollution to environment in terms of noise and air quality.
    Just today on CNN i watched a documentry On "principal Voices" talking on alternative energy which was solar power (photo voltaic an wind turbine) which is safe efficient and green. which was functioning effectively and still affordable despite the fact that the sunlight intensity in the was very poor, Here we are in the equitorial region where it shines heavily enough to cook a stone but we don't harness these resources. In a report it was said if they could construct a solar panel big enough to cover the Sahara desert it would Power the need of the whole world including the Artics, Here we are just relying on the unsure NEPA that makes everyone shout Hhaaaaaaaaaaaa(off) and Hheeeeeeeeeee(on) and the new power retainer PHCN that doesn't make the difference from the former and may be the coming PFCN (power flasher Corporation of *******).
   Honestly they have just taken the power(light--Ina, awon NEPA or whateva) my UPS will power off now i gat to round off,
Barrymore keep it up if it is a dream make it real, Ideas rule the world, Be a problem solver be rich hope to see your product out, pity i am not an engineer.
, Beware of the use of generators please, The fume, A toxicologist will tell you the implication.
I sign out now before UPSs,
    [/size][size=8pt][/size][size=8pt][/size][size=8pt]
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by duzz: 9:38am On Nov 23, 2007
From my knowledge in this field its not just what the effort an price, if you consider the fact that it cost just from $400m to build a single cycle 1000 megawatts power plant, its takes from 25yrs and above for any solar project to break-even, for prices of solar system you can see it at this link http://www.affordable-solar.com/Solar.Home.Zia.Power.htm
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by lyfe(m): 9:42am On Nov 24, 2007
$400m oh we do not need that, we need something that is cheap and efficient as well for our own geographical location which is part of the world that has one of the highest sunshine intensity. We do not need the $400m to build a single cycle 1000 MW power plant cos we are not in the Artics and not in Iceland.

For Nigerians, I feel it is worth it if a good and efficent solar(pv) panel goes for less than N400,000, at least, it will power the essential devices in the house not heater, iron, cooker, and even Ac as well.

Though I once saw a solar panel in a farmer's house in Oyo state, Nigeria that uses solar panel which functions very well in the daylight when sun shines and rely on the back-up (The battery or inverter) at night when there are no more photons from sunlight and when i asked him he said it could carry the load of Iron and even a small fridge and some other appliances. A very small one indeed.
My light is out again I gat to send this I will get the $400m single cycle 1000 MW power plant tomorrow. if i was close to miss Pat etteh , NEPA this is F**King frustrating.

1 Like

Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Nobody: 1:36pm On Nov 24, 2007
http://www.madehow.com/Volume-1/Solar-Cell.html

check the link on how to make solar celss
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by solarcity(f): 1:55pm On Dec 01, 2007
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You will find answers to your various questions and more:
• How does solar power work?
• How do the various components of the system hook up and interact with each other?
• Could I install it myself? How to choose the right components
• Can I still use all my appliances?
• How will I know if it’s being installed correctly?



This is a reference manual that you cannot afford to be without, if you are at all interested in solar electric systems.
With the information contained in this E-Book, if you are at all handy with tools, you should be well on your way to installing your own moderate sized solar electric system. Even if you're not the Do-It-Yourself type or simply don't have the time to do the actual installation, the knowledge gained from this E-Book will allow you to figure out the size of system you need.
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• Energy Conservation
• System Design and Sizing
• Electricity Basics
• Solar Panels
• Batteries
• Charge Controllers
• Inverters
• Wiring and Safety
• Installation and Maintenance
• Energy Saving Appliances

Please also find below, the Table of Contents
• Introduction
• What Solar Power Can Do For You
• Solar Power Applications
• Solar Power Potentials In Nigeria
• The Solar Market in Africa
• Electricity Basics (AC – DC)
• Types Of Solar Power Systems
• Solar Power Components
All About Solar Panels - Types of Solar Panels, Wiring Diagrams, Mounting and Orientation
• Batteries – Shallow and Deep Cycle Batteries, Installation and Wiring Diagrams, Connections, Charging and Discharging, Capacities
• Inverters – Types of Inverters, Inverter Wiring Diagram
• Charge Controllers – Wiring Diagram, Important Check Points
• Solar Power System Planning – Site Survey, Power Load Survey, Battery Location and Enclosure, Solar Panel Location, Mounting and Orientation e.t.c.
• Solar Power System Sizing – How to calculate the number of solar panels you need, How to determine the size of your battery bank, How to size charge controller and inverter includes real world examples of sizing calculations covering Power Load Calculations, Solar Array Sizing Calculations and Battery Sizing Calculations
• Solar Power System Safety – For Solar panels, batteries and Inverters
• Solar Power System Installation – How do you install a solar panel, battery, inverter and charge controller, How do you connect all your power loads, How do you determine cable sizes and wiring connections, Final Installation Sequence, Includes various visual diagrams showing how all components are connected and solar power installation steps
• Solar Power System Commissioning – How to use a Multi-Meter, Testing your Solar Panel, Testing and Inspecting Batteries, Final Connection Tests, System Completion Certificate
• Solar Power System Monitoring – How you Monitor your system
• Solar Power System Maintenance – How you keep your system working for you for life!!!
• Solar Power System Trouble Shooting – Properly installed Solar Power Systems are unlikely to fail but problems sometimes do crop up, in that case, the Troubleshoot guide shows you the key places to check, also includes a Troubleshoot checklist
• Appendix – Shows Insolation Maps and Tables, Cable/Wire Sizing Tables, Sample Wiring Diagrams, Power Ratings of Common Appliances, Sample Sizing Form, Sample Test Certificate, Various Photos
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by hicomm2: 12:05pm On Jan 27, 2008
Can i please have the email & hone number of the guy who sent you the quote for the solar inverter?
Thanks smiley
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Kobojunkie: 5:08pm On Jan 27, 2008
The claim that Solar Panels are Expensive in a place like Nigeria and hence not affordable is a myth. It is not based on fact but people's perception of the technology and mostly push by suppliers of generators to sell their products. Anyone in Nigeria can start on Solar today and in a matter of years reap the benefits of having solar as against generators and more. The average Nigerian family spends almost $100k a year on fueling generators and this does not include the price of the generator and other tools which run way into the hundreds of thousands on initial buy.






There is a house in Nigeria as we speak running off of solar energy. The total one time cost of Solar panels, equipment and installation to supply that 2 storey building with electricity 24 hours of the day is about $5000. Below is the cost of operation


Year One TOTAL  POWER COST
Solar Panels $ installation ~  $5000 ( Just in case you may need to add frames to hold the panels or you can do it yourself)
SunLight , Free

Year Two TOTAL  POWER COST

Solar panels maintanance fees,  $50 ( should anything happen that you even need maintainance for
SunLight , Free


Year Three TOTAL  POWER COST

Solar panels maintanance fees,  $50 ( should anything happen that you even need maintainance for
SunLight , Free

Year Four TOTAL  POWER COST

Solar panels maintanance fees,  $50 ( should anything happen that you even need maintainance for
SunLight , Free

Year Five TOTAL  POWER COST

Solar panels maintanance fees,  $50 ( should anything happen that you even need maintainance for
SunLight , Free


Year Six TOTAL  POWER COST

Solar panels maintanance fees,  $50 ( should anything happen that you even need maintainance for
SunLight , Free

Year Seven TOTAL  POWER COST

Solar panels maintanance fees,  $50 ( should anything happen that you even need maintainance for
SunLight , Free



,  you get the idea now . Now how much more expensive is this compared to what you currently have to deal with now In the first year alone, put together the amount you had to pay for the generator, the inverter and then how much you ended up paying to fuel the generator for the first year alone . Now put it together over time and tell me how much more expensive it is compared to solar??

I believe the main reason why Nigerians are not using solar much is cause instead of actually doing their research, people believe what they hear and are told of it and this puts more money into the sellers of generators and inverters for those as well as continues to put money into the pockets of the oil industry at the cost of the environment. Solar is not expensive if you consider it costs almost the same amount it would cost you to install and fuel a generator the first year alone. After the initial cost, it is practically free of charge since you do not have to fuel it and most of the panels come with at least 10 years warranty ( meaning you get at least 10 years out of use of it) and you get 24 hour electricty with no noice pollution and not environmental pollution of any kind.


Right now Nigerians spend about[b] $150 Million dollars on generators and fuel to gas them up EACH YEAR[/b]. We do not understand that this same can be spent one time for most of the country one and for all for power supply for at least 10 years. We need to start doing research instead of spewing the same old news which only amounts to repeating information that is passed down to us by people who themselves do not do their homework.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by ayinba1(f): 5:35pm On Jan 27, 2008
@Kobojunkie

I tried to IM or email you but I see you have nothing on your profile. My email is ayinba@yahoo.com.
If you have more info about this $5000 solar energy, I will appreciate it and hey! I am not trying to make friends. I read your post and I just need more info.

Thanks
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Kobojunkie: 5:43pm On Jan 27, 2008
What do you mean when you say you want more info about the $5000 solar?? What I mean is a house in Nigeria is currently running on Solar energy and the total cost to put the whole together is approximately $5000 but the benefits have been enormous and this guy does not have to worry about the cost of Diesel fuel or even noise pollution at night. It is clean and easy to install. Infact, the average Nigerian who is willing to read up and learn on his own can buy the equipment and tools and put it all together easy with no professional installation needed.

I am IM-able, just that I get more trash ( people who im me to ask me asl and tell me they want to be friends for no good reason at all) than I do serious inquiries. But feel free to IM me again and I am online and I did not see your IM come up at all.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by ayinba1(f): 6:59pm On Jan 27, 2008
@KOBOJUNKIE

I am at work, I cannot IM but thanks for your response. I understand it to mean that the person built it himself. I am not very tech savvy, I thought that he purchased the package from someone.
I will however try to research it and see if I can build it myself
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by Kobojunkie: 7:12pm On Jan 27, 2008
You can buy the panels and equipment from companies that sell them. I am not sure of companies in Nigeria that offer the service but it is possible to deal with legit companies all over that purchase directly from manufacturers of these technologies. You can look online for articles that will explain to you what you need and how to install it on your own. There are tons of how to books and video resources available both online and offline. Infact a brilliant person can take this on as business in Nigeria. Basically become a self taught Solar Panel installer and he can open a reseller account with many of the companies out there that manufacture them such as GE and NanoSolar.

There are also various organizations you can contact for information on what you will need and how to go about installing it.

http://www.solarliving.org/?GCID=S30542x001&MATCHTYPE=search&KEYWORD=solar%20power%20install&utm_source=google&utm_medium=ppc&utm_term=solar%20power%20install

http://www.solarexpert.com/instroof5.html

http://www.svhotwire.com/solar_panel_faqs.html#5

http://www.etaengineering.com/panels/kyocera.shtml

http://www.solarpanelinfo.com/
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by uspry1(f): 11:49pm On Jan 28, 2008
Here is enclosed link provided to find Solar Panels & equipment distributors in Nigeria at below:
Either click
1) By the Type of Solar energy product in Nigeria

2) By Business Type in Nigeria

3) By Business Name in Nigeria

[be aware of ripped off unprofessional distributors - - -i heard from Nigerian complaints]

http://energy.sourceguides.com/businesses/byGeo/byC/Nigeria/byP/solar/solar.shtml
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by netprofit(m): 12:13pm On Apr 21, 2008
[size=8pt]How to Make a Solar Power Generator for Less Than $300 [/size]




Using parts easily available from your local stores, you can make a small solar power generator for $250 to $300. Great for power failures and life outside the power grid. Power your computer, modem, vcr, tv, cameras, lights, or DC appliances anywhere you go. Use in cabins, boats, tents, archaeological digs, or while travelling throughout the third world. Have one in the office store room in case of power failures in your highrise. I keep mine in my bedroom where it powers my cd player, turntable, lights, modem, laptop, and (ahem) a back massager. I run a line out the window to an 8" x 24" panel on the roof.




1. Buy yourself a small solar panel. For about $100 you should be able to get one rated at 12 volts or better (look for 16 volts) at an RV or marine supplies store.



2. Buy yourself a battery. Get any size deep cycle 12 volt lead/acid or gel battery. You need the deep cycle battery for continuous use. The kind in your car is a cranking battery--just for starting an engine. Look for bargains, it should cost about $50-60.



3. Get a battery box to put it in for $10. (This is good for covering up the exposed terminals in case there are children about If you going to install the system in a pump shed, cabin, or boat, skip this.)



3. Buy a 12 volt DC meter. Radio Shack has them for about $25.

4. Buy a DC input. I like the triple inlet model which you can find at a car parts store in the cigarette lighter parts section for about $10. This is enough to power DC appliances, and there are many commercially available, like fans, one-pint water boilers, lights, hair dryers, baby bottle warmers, and vacuum cleaners. Many cassette players, answering machines, and other electrical appliances are DC already and with the right cable will run straight off the box.



5. But if you want to run AC appliances, you will have to invest in an inverter. This will convert the stored DC power in the battery into AC power for most of your household appliances. I bought a 115 volt 140 watt inverter made by Power-to-Go at Pep Boys for $50. More powerful inverters are available by mail. Count up the number of watts you'll be using (e.g., a small color television(=60 watts) with a VCR(=22 watts), you'll need 82 watts).



6. Use a drill to attach the meter and DC input to the top of the box.

7. Use insulated wire to attach the meter to the wingnut terminals on the battery. Connect the negative (-) pole first. Only handle one wire at a time. Connect the DC inlet to the battery in the same way. Connect the solar panel to the battery in the same way.



8. Close the lid (I use a bungee cord to keep it tight). Put the solar panel in the sun. It takes 5-8 hours to charge a dead battery; 1-3 hours to top off a weak one. It will run radios, fans, and small wattage lights all night, or give you about 5 hours of continuous use at 115 volt AC, or about an hour boiling water. This system may be added on to with larger panels, inverters, and batteries.
Options: A pop-up circuit breaker may be added between the positive treminal and the volt meter. Some of you will want an ampmeter as well. The panels I recommend have built-in bypass diodes, but I recommend charge controllers for people who have panels without diodes. Another option is a voltage regulator, which is not necessary for a system this small, but a larger system would require one.


Technical specifications for this solar power generator, some solar links, and more about solar power.
Tired of the high cost of of solar panels? Hate cloudy days? Try optimizing your panel this way.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by outlaws(m): 7:48am On Apr 23, 2008
cool

The next millionaires in Nigeria will come from solar energy for electric supply or for running equipments
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by abujabooks(f): 12:01pm On May 21, 2008
Lack of awareness of benefits.
Lack of installers. (At the moment, probably 1 commonly known installer)
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by winnteam(m): 4:05pm On May 31, 2008
I SWEAR, I KNOW OF SOMEBODY WHO GENERATE'S SOLAR ENERGY FROM COMMON FUFU.

I AM SURE YOU CAN ALSO GENERATE SOLAR ENERGY FROM AMALA AND EBA BUT NOT ACAMU.

GOOD NEWS.
Re: Why Is Solar Power Not Commonly Used In Nigeria? by eldee(m): 4:09pm On May 31, 2008
winnteam:

I SWEAR, I KNOW OF SOMEBODY WHO GENERATE'S SOLAR ENERGY FROM COMMON FUFU.

I AM SURE YOU CAN ALSO GENERATE SOLAR ENERGY FROM AMALA AND EBA BUT NOT ACAMU.

GOOD NEWS.


Ever wondered why it's called 'SOLAR energy'? cheesy

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