Nairaland Forum

Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / Login / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 1262816 members, 1711924 topics. Date: Friday, 31 October 2014 at 09:03 PM

For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life - Travel - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Travel / For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life (9880 Views)

How Easy Is Getting Admission Into Netherlands Univeristies And Visa / More Illegals Set To Flood South Africa / Nigerian Illegals Arrested At Home Office (1) (2) (3) (4)

(0) (1) (Reply) (Go Down)

For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Ptimes: 11:00am On Feb 07, 2012
When Nigerian-born illegal, Timothy, couldn’t feed himself, he approached the Dutch food bank. But because he was an illegal, he was refused

Every Thursday, Osaror Timothy rides his bicycle to dispatch 2,600 newspapers to the same number of homes in Tilburg, a Dutch city of over 200 thousand people. Dark and of average height, Timothy’s major problem is not the delivery of the papers, but evading police arrest.

Timothy’s fear of arrest is not borne out of committing any immediate crime, but because his stay in the Netherlands is un-official. By Dutch law, he is an illegal immigrant.

“Each day I move on the streets, I move with the fear of getting arrested by the police,” he said.

Illegals

Timothy is one of the 100,000 illegals living in the Netherlands, READ MORE AT: http://premiumtimesng.com/news/foreign/3689-nigerian-illegals-in-netherlands-live-tough-and-risky-life.html
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Vicjustice: 11:28am On Feb 07, 2012
Ptimes:

When Nigerian-born illegal, Timothy, couldn’t feed himself, he approached the Dutch food bank. But because he was an illegal, he was refused

Every Thursday, Osaror Timothy rides his bicycle to dispatch 2,600 newspapers to the same number of homes in Tilburg, a Dutch city of over 200 thousand people. Dark and of average height, Timothy’s major problem is not the delivery of the papers, but evading police arrest.

Timothy’s fear of arrest is not borne out of committing any immediate crime, but because his stay in the Netherlands is un-official. By Dutch law, he is an illegal immigrant.

“Each day I move on the streets, I move with the fear of getting arrested by the police,” he said.

Illegals

Timothy is one of the 100,000 illegals living in the Netherlands, READ MORE AT: http://premiumtimesng.com/news/foreign/3689-nigerian-illegals-in-netherlands-live-tough-and-risky-life.html
   Interesting piece; "Timothy" works once a week (on Thursdays only) for 15 hours and earns E220, that's not bad for an illegal worker.
   But why not paste the full articles here? That report would become outdated and may be deleted someday, and then, this thread will become a "nonsense"
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Nobody: 12:55pm On Feb 07, 2012
sadly, thats the kind of life that most illegal immigrants live abroad, what do they expect?! some may fool themselves that they are safe but, unless they have the right visa status, they aint!

as harsh as it may sound, we can ONLY blame Timothy for the situation he finds himself in. his employer will never respect him (or pay him the fair salary he deserves) as long as there are desperate people willing to do such tough jobs for mere €220per month. KAI!!! (even flipping burgers at Mc Ds, will get you a better hourly rate)

i had a friend who did the exact same job in Denmark, in deadly cold weather. one day the employer put the newspapers on his delivery bike and, the bike was so heavy that my buddy couldnt even pull the damn bike. he resigned on the spot, and funny enough, the only delivery guys in that company were either blacks/Arabs from Africa, Afghanis/irakis or east Europeans from places like Moldova, Ukraine, or some other God forsaken country.

the amazing part of this story is that Timothy will rather suffer and be treated like a slave (for ₦47K), instead of going back home to 9ja. to each their own!

@Vicjustice
thanks again for the help yesterday.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by HerbertObi(m): 1:46pm On Feb 07, 2012
For Nigerian illegals in the Netherlands, it is a tough and risky life
06/02/2012 19:18:00 Idris Akinbajo and Bjinse Dankert
Font size: Decrease font Enlarge font
image For fear of arrest, Timothy wouldn't allow his face shown

When Nigerian-born illegal, Timothy, couldn’t feed himself, he approached the Dutch food bank. But because he was an illegal, he was refused

Every Thursday, Osaror Timothy rides his bicycle to dispatch 2,600 newspapers to the same number of homes in Tilburg, a Dutch city of over 200 thousand people. Dark and of average height, Timothy’s major problem is not the delivery of the papers, but evading police arrest.

Timothy’s fear of arrest is not borne out of committing any immediate crime, but because his stay in the Netherlands is un-official. By Dutch law, he is an illegal immigrant.

“Each day I move on the streets, I move with the fear of getting arrested by the police,” he said.

Illegals

Timothy is one of the 100,000 illegals living in the Netherlands. Although official statistics are unavailable for this category of people (illegals are not captured in official statistics), the Dutch Ministry of Justice and Security estimates that 100,000 illegals were in the Netherlands as at 2009. Citizens of Sub-Saharan African countries (including Nigeria) make up 23 per cent of that figure.

These categories of people lack the necessary documents to live in the country. Not only are they not entitled to live, they can also not legally work, get accommodation and health insurance.

This is in contrast with the 10,000 Nigerians who according to the Dutch Bureau of Statistics, live in the Netherlands legally. This is a 300 per cent increase from the over 3000 that lived in the country in 1996.

Timothy’s story

Born 28 years ago in Benin, Timothy arrived in the Netherlands in January 2007. He sought asylum claiming to be a member of a youth group called END in the oil producing Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Timothy claims that his group was wrongly linked to the militant group MEND (Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta) and that the Nigerian Government was persecuting them. MEND claimed responsibility for the October 1, 2010 independence day bomb blast in Nigeria’s capital, Abuja that killed eight people.

“I can’t go back to Nigeria; in Nigeria, I am considered an enemy of the state,” he said.

Aduro or Asylum

Aduro is a Yoruba (South Western Nigeria) word which literally means “someone who stays or remains.” It is the term Nigerians who stay(ed) in European asylum camps use to refer to a person who is allowed to stay at the camps; or to refer to permission to stay at the camp itself. Terms like “So ti je aduro,” “have you been given permission to stay at the camp is common among Nigerian illegals in the Netherlands.

Foreigners who want to seek asylum are taken to a detention centre, and then to an application centre. After several interviews, those whose stories appear believable pending investigation are allowed into one of the 45 asylum camps (aduro), while those whose applications are refused are instantly deported to their home countries.

Though not rosy, life at the Asylum Camp is not terrible, Timothy says.

“You stay two in a room, we are paid 55 euro (N12, 000) every Thursday, and are given something like an ID card with which to move around the country.”

Refugee camp residents wait for their asylum status. The wait could keep them there for up to two years during which time the Dutch authorities determine if they should be granted asylum or not. Those who are granted are given legal status to live and work in the Netherlands, while those not given are either deported or continue to live as illegals hiding from authorities.

Timothy spent the maximum two years at the asylum camp. Dutch Authorities eventually rejected his application and he was asked to leave the country in 2009.

“I was asked to leave the camp and leave the country. I was given a letter to leave the Netherlands,” Timothy said.

Life as an illegal

Timothy left the Asylum camp not wanting to be deported to Nigeria. He lived on the streets for four months feeding from the little he saved while at the camp before he met a friend in Church. He lived with his friend for another three months.

Getting a job is very difficult for illegals as Dutch law does not allow it. Individuals and companies that employ illegals do so secretly. Timothy got his first job while living with a friend. A devout Christian, he says he got the job by “divine intervention.” He began distributing papers to earn 60euro (N12, 600) a month.

When he got a wider opening to distribute more papers, he grabbed it and began distributing the 2600 papers.

“I work from 6.30am to 9.30pm every Thursday,” he says.

The monthly minimum wage in the Netherlands is about 1,400euro (N294, 000), but Timothy earns less than 20 percent of that, 220euro (46,200) per month.

Timothy does not know how much he should actually earn for the job he does.

His friend who helped him get the job collects the money and pays him the 220 euro. Several illegals get their job this way. He is however not bordered about finding out if his friend is cheating him.

“I am happy I can even earn some money. There are many like me who cannot work to earn anything. In any case, who do I report to,” Timothy says, while lamenting that as an illegal, he cannot even report a crime for fear of deportation.

From his earnings, the Benin-born Nigerian pays a rent of 200euro for his small apartment which he rented from someone he met in Church.

“My friend was treating me like a slave, so I had to get my own place,” Timothy said.

When asked how he survives on 20 euro a month, Timothy answered “I live to pay my bills, not to feed. But it’s God that keeps me alive.”

T

Timothy and a Premium Times' reporter



No food for you

Timothy tells of how finding food to eat in one of the largest food producing countries in the world can be difficult. At a time when he couldn’t feed himself, he approached the Dutch food bank for food. But because he was an illegal, he was refused.

“I was rejected from getting food from the food bank. That is a place where if I have my legal documents and can work officially, I would never go there for food. When I think about it, I almost cry,” he said

“I consider the food there condemned food, but I was still rejected.”

We don’t know them

Despite the hundreds of Nigerians living like Timothy in the Netherlands, the Nigerian embassy in the country has no statistics or data of the Nigerian illegals.

Nimota Akanbi, the Nigerian Ambassador stated that the embassy only has data of people who come to register willingly.

“It is the responsibility of Nigerians in the Netherlands to register at this embassy. As soon as they arrive in this country, they are obliged to register. But we cannot force anyone to come here to register.” she said.

No return for me

Timothy like many other Nigerian illegals has no plan to return home.

“I fear for my life if I return home,” says Timothy. “I don’t know how I would be able to survive, that is if I am not killed.”

With a National Diploma from a Polytechnic, he plans to continue his education in the Netherlands and then settle down to work and live there.

“I will live on the streets just to go to school because I believe in education,” he says.

I don’t blame the Dutch

The situation in Nigeria was the main source of blame for the Nigerian illegals. Nigeria, the seventh largest oil producer also has one of the world’s worst poverty rates. Over half of the 160 million population live on less than $2 per day with millions of youth unemployed.

When asked to comment on his general treatment by Dutch authorities since he arrived in the Netherlands, Timothy said “I will not say the Dutch people are good or bad. They did not send me an invitation to come here. I was the one who made the decision to come here.”

The second part of this report will be published next Monday




http://premiumtimesng.com/news/foreign/3689-nigerian-illegals-in-netherlands-live-tough-and-risky-life.html
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Vicjustice: 1:49pm On Feb 07, 2012
MRbrownJAY:

@Vicjustice
thanks again for the help yesterday.
What "help" was that, i can't recall
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by justwise(m): 5:27pm On Feb 07, 2012
Vicjustice:

What "help" was that, i can't recall

grin grin justwise=Vicjustice grin grin
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Vicjustice: 5:41pm On Feb 07, 2012
justwise:

grin grin justwise=Vicjustice grin grin
Lol, you've taken my credits before, so, it's ok if i take yours this time. I don't blame those who accused or suspected us of being the same person cheesy grin cheesy grin
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by justwise(m): 5:45pm On Feb 07, 2012
Vicjustice:

Lol, you've taken my credits before, so, it's ok if i take yours this time. I don't blame those who accused or suspected us of being the same person cheesy grin cheesy grin

grin grin its all good.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Nobody: 9:17pm On Feb 07, 2012
^^lol, my bad. actually i only just realized that it was 2 different person. your names sound so similar in my mind that i automatically thought one was the other. my earlier message was for JUSTWISE.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by justwise(m): 9:38pm On Feb 07, 2012
MRbrownJAY:

^^lol, my bad. actually i only just realized that it was 2 different person. your names sound so similar in my mind that i automatically thought one was the other. my earlier message was for JUSTWISE.

grin grin grin it does happen here sometimes. grin grin
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by llbhuds: 9:47pm On Feb 07, 2012
living illegally in europe is no longer the issue, i think the main issue is how can u reside legally in europe?
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Nobody: 10:24pm On Feb 07, 2012
^^ i think the problem is MUCH BIGGER than that, because many live legally and yet have worst lives than Timothy (unless they have a sound education, chances are THAT'S the kind a jobs they will be doing). . . . . . . its a social problem!!! our 9ja brothas and sistas want to run away from 9ja at all cost, but yet, their ego wont let them return if they dont have anything to show for (aka failure).

so they rather suffer far away incognito, pretend to their family & friends that "LIFE IN EUROPE IS GRAND" (while doing miserable jobs), and thus hope that a miracle will happen along the way. many would be better off back in 9ja, many had better lives back in 9ja, many would never take such humiliation in 9ja, but because they are far away and desperate to "make it", they accept this degrading lifestyle.

it is embedded in the 9ja genes, success in Nigeria is only valued when you drive a big car OR get married. . . . . . .BUT, how can you get married when most 9ja women are driven by MONEY and not LOVE? but in the same sentence, how can they value a man for his character when their parents wouldnt let them marry a GREAT man that was poor?! its a vicious circle that has men (and women) degrade themselves. so, the WHOLE Nigerian society is partly to be blame for whats happening abroad!
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Nobody: 12:50am On Feb 08, 2012
Alarm blow 4 Europe cheesy.


Sorry Timothy. God dey! cool
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by gempo(m): 12:19pm On Feb 08, 2012
I wonder if there is any country you will go to in this world and you will not see Nigerians.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by didadavid(m): 12:39pm On Feb 08, 2012
@gempo, even afghanistan and Somalia? We're way better than those countries I mentioned. And come to think of it, most Nigerians in Europe are doing menial jobs because they do not have what we call "hand-work" in Nigeria. A plumber, bricklayer, Electrician, Furniture maker will survive more easily. If Timothy were an electrician he would earn up to at least 20 euros per hour. Imagine earning 20 and working 8 hours per day * 26 days. If you dont have hand-work please do not go to europe, but if you do, safe journey.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by babaowo: 12:48pm On Feb 08, 2012
Its not adviseable to be living illegal in any part of the world. Better marry an old woman or even junkies if its hard for u to find nice babe.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by vladimiros: 1:09pm On Feb 08, 2012
why would somone go to a county as an illegal
jeez. even if ur poor apply for refugee status
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Nobody: 1:14pm On Feb 08, 2012
didadavid:

@gempo, even afghanistan and Somalia? We're way better than those countries I mentioned.

when Nigerians are gladly going to Irak, Iran, Mongolia, Kazakhstan etc to get out of 9ja, you are here talking about mere Afghanistan?!
read some of the travel threads on NL to understand that THERE ARE NIGERIANS EVERYWHERE IN THE WORLD.

here is one for you: http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-723476.0.html
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by odiaero(m): 1:29pm On Feb 08, 2012
MRbrownJAY:

sadly, thats the kind of life that most illegal immigrants live abroad, what do they expect?! some may fool themselves that they are safe but, unless they have the right visa status, they aint!

as harsh as it may sound, we can ONLY blame Timothy for the situation he finds himself in. his employer will never respect him (or pay him the fair salary he deserves) as long as there are desperate people willing to do such tough jobs for mere €220per month. KAI!!! (even flipping burgers at Mc Ds, will get you a better hourly rate)

i had a friend who did the exact same job in Denmark, in deadly cold weather. one day the employer put the newspapers on his delivery bike and, the bike was so heavy that my buddy couldnt even pull the damn bike. he resigned on the spot, and funny enough, the only delivery guys in that company were either blacks/Arabs from Africa, Afghanis/irakis or east Europeans from places like Moldova, Ukraine, or some other God forsaken country.

the amazing part of this story is that Timothy will rather suffer and be treated like a slave (for ₦47K), instead of going back home to 9ja. to each their own!

@Vicjustice
thanks again for the help yesterday.


Vicjustice:

What "help" was that, i can't recall

LWKMD @ BOLD grin
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by Limaoscar: 1:33pm On Feb 08, 2012
Guy, pack your bags and go home-------Haba, which kind self inflicted suffer-"ring" be this one.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by IjogzK(m): 1:44pm On Feb 08, 2012
He was smart to av avoided putting the blame on the dutch authority, They didn't apply to them, they dont need him, he is the only 1 dat needs their help ,
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by eghost247(m): 1:49pm On Feb 08, 2012
reality
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by 4teelaw(f): 2:00pm On Feb 08, 2012
the guy should leave netherlands for other "friendlier" european countries na! see suffer!!
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by john6006: 2:02pm On Feb 08, 2012
I think is better to be illegal in Holland as to be legal in Nigeria without social package's for the Unemployed, In Holland you can still go and get food for free even without jobs, But is that possible in Nigeria?
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by kizito96(m): 2:28pm On Feb 08, 2012
Its a big problem for our brothers who live illegally in Europe
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by aglomar: 2:32pm On Feb 08, 2012
D guy should come back home. Even if na farming e go do 4 hia. People are making it here everyday, with God.
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by AduroSurvivor: 2:41pm On Feb 08, 2012
Timothy, in case you happen to read this thread I am writing this story to inspire you not to deride you. I was an "Aduro" like you about 12-14 yrs ago. While my situation was not as worse as what you are going through, it was all the same mentally killing. But I had something that kept my mind occupied. Before I left Nigeria I had a goal in mind and in sight. Which was that I was leaving Nigeria to seek a better education and up to the highest level possible. I already had a first degree (a second-class upper result as well). If you have something higher in mind and work toward it, no matter how difficult it is, fate would put you through it. You only need to be persistent. For my 2.5 yrs as an Aduro, I could only think and dream about just one thing. My goals. I washed toilets, cleaned plates, worked as a building demolition guy, renovated buildings, and even worked as a rail-line construction worker. The privilege I had was that I ended up in a country where I was allowed to work temporarily even though I was an Aduro. It was a battle, paying lawyers to fight my case and using that to buy time to actualize my goals. I would not "chase" white girls to get residency paper as was/is common. I just could not do that even though I had couple of white and black (African origin) girl friends. One of my black girl-friends actually had it in her little mind that I was going out with her in order to get "paper". But I was always clear about my motive and plan. I remember telling her that I was not planning to stay there because I do not see my future in such a country. Another "half-cast" African origin young divorcee who was only 3 yrs older than I was willing to give me "paper" on a platter of goal. I was adamant that I have to follow through with my plan. By the time God in his grace and mercy had worked out my plan for me, I was already been told by the authorities to leave their country. I was even bundled (not forcefully though) to the Nigeria embassy in order to collect documents to expedite my deportation. Yes, I went to the embassy with them, and even told the worker I spoke with at the embassy that I was working on a plan that they should issue the document only after some weeks. After then, I already had a letter of admission to start a paid Masters degree in another English-speaking country. I'd worked like "jack" and saved up to 20000 Deutschmark (I kept all my funds with a cousin living in Germany, though I did not live in Germany). I did not do drugs, I worked and saved funds for almost 2yrs of working. At a point they collected my work-permit and were paying me "pea-nuts" allowance. Okay with me because my plan was almost through. My Nigerian friends laughed at me that I was not buying clothes for myself and that I would just "die" (that is exactly what a friend, said).

Even before the Nigeria travel document was issued to expedite my travel back home, I boldly walked to the immigration authority by myself one beautiful summer day. I told the guy responsible for my case that I was ready to go home and he thought he did not hear me well. I repeated myself, and he proposed that I should come back after few days. I returned after few days, and he took me seriously and set a travel date for me to take a flight to Nigeria. I kept the date. My "half-cast" girlfriend cried like hell with the hope that I would change my mind. I did not. On the day, I kept my appointment with the authorized guy who was to escort me to the airport. My girlfriend also escorted me. I would say I was not deported, the guy simply released my tickets and other travel documents to me and each time we passed an immigration point at the airport he would speak to the immigration worker on my behalf. I finally said good bye to my girlfriend and after the last immigration control point I was let go by myself to take the plane with all the dignity in me. I arrived home at the airport and was not bothered much when I presented a traveling certificate to the Nigerian immigration. I was let go without a trouble.

With my letter of admission in hand I faced the embassy of the country I was supposed to travel to, to begin my higher studies. God in his grace made them issued a student visa to me. I had enough funds, though not in my name but in a German bank with a letter from the mum of my cousin saying that the fund is for my education. I knew that if I had presented a bank account in my name I had no evidence of working in Nigeria. On the whole I spent additional 3-months in Nigeria.

After an additional 6yrs of post-graduate education in the country I traveled to, with a PhD degree I did not have to pay a dime for, each time I look back I thank good God that he made me make the right decisions. Now, if I release my name for you to "google", you like those who knew me in those days I was struggling will find it hard to believe how a 'jack' like me ended up working with the best science research groups in the world with my name as an author of impressive scientific publications. Now I work with one of the largest company in the world with a 6-figure salary. And you know what, God is not done with me yet because I still have to keep to my ultimate goal which I set back then. Run a company of my own, and where will that be in? In Nigeria of course. So I will be giving up all the comfort and highly paid salary to follow-up my dream and plan again. I know God will not fail me because I he did not fail me before now, and because he has led me this far, he would not fail me now because all along I let Him know what my ultimate goal is.

So, Timothy and others in similar situation. Be bold and make decisions that others would think that you are probably crazy taking. Set your mind on something to keep you busy while God fight your cause. I remember a point then when my transcript was not released by the university I went to in Nigeria because I had sent a friend to collect it for me. I decided I was going to Nigeria to collect it myself and one of my friend said I was crazy. He recommended that I should instead travel illegally to Ireland and that he could help arrange my travel there. Thank God the transcript was eventually released, and I did not have to go to Nigeria earlier than planned. The lesson from all this is that, we Nigerians need to face and fight our "demons". And these "demons" (things keeping us back) are nowhere but all in Nigeria. Each of us only have one life and we need to start (and even fight) to live our dreams. There is nothing wrong with that. Because we all have dreams.

3 Likes

Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by BanditC: 3:01pm On Feb 08, 2012
How did this article degenerate into running away to Europe, failure and living a condescending life.

Before i go on a little rant, let me indulge a little economics. The Maslow needs pyramid states that the most important need of a rational human being is the need for survival which trickles down to need for food, clothing and security. Every other need like luxury or self fulfillment need, comes after these and are termed ''secondary''

Now, Nigeria as a country and it's environment (political, social and economic) lag embarrassingly behind in providing a conducive means of fulfilling these ''essential'' human need. It is then very obvious that people would migrate to and sit tight in countries that provide means to fulfill the basic needs of humans.

So a man who finds himself in Europe but resides illegally would try all he can to remain there because all those essential needs problems have been eradicated. Europe and North America are far ahead of Nigeria in any way imaginable and provide security and food for their residents so as long as people can easily come by food to eat and lay their heads to sleep without worries of insecurity, they would remain there.

Contrary to what most believe, people who distribute newspaper or do some other menial jobs do so because that is actually what they are qualified for and would also be doing such jobs if they were in Nigeria, difference being that they would earn far less and under far worse and dangerous work condition (think street hawkers and truck pushers).

Fellow blacks around here who actually attend tertiary institutions and graduate have far much better jobs. For instance, my female cousin is working at the German Central Bank now after having worked for the European Central Bank for a year and she just came over here in 2003. Another friend works with Moody's and is doing awesome on it.

Another instance is this, most Nigerians in Germany actually detest going to University here and continuing their undergraduate or masters degree programmes, even though education here is 100 percent free and you can change courses or universities  for as much as you want but they rather sit at home and push out baby after baby, living off the social system while their husbands hang around african shops. But even under these conditions, their livelihood is still better than 80 percent of those in Nigeria.

Lastly, in Germany for example, you would hardly see any true German doing those jobs because the system has being so designed, that from a very young age, every individual has a career path and they stick to these parts vigorously. Painters and hand workers actually do exams called ''meisterprüfung'' and earn certificates before they can operate as one. The system is so advanced that even over the counter bank workers are not University graduates but have a completely different training called ''ausbildung'' while the real computing, trading, indexing and equity management jobs are reserved for the best of the bests. So everyone is engaged and have something tangible to do planned from childhood.

I love Nigeria to death and am always there but the notion that they would be better off in Nigeria is a blatant lie. If they would want to move to Nigeria and stay, it should be out of their own conviction but not because the life in Nigeria is better than what is obtainable in Europe, light years from it.

1 Like

Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by tanimola22: 3:04pm On Feb 08, 2012
AduroSurvivor:

Timothy, in case you happen to read this thread I am writing this story to inspire you not to deride you. I was an "Aduro" like you about 12-14 yrs ago. While my situation was not as worse as what you are going through, it was all the same mentally killing. But I had something that kept my mind occupied. Before I left Nigeria I had a goal in mind and in sight. Which was that I was leaving Nigeria to seek a better education and up to the highest level possible. I already had a first degree (a second-class upper result as well). If you have something higher in mind and work toward it, no matter how difficult it is, fate would put you through it. You only need to be persistent. For my 2.5 yrs as an Aduro, I could only think and dream about just one thing. My goals. I washed toilets, cleaned plates, worked as a building demolition guy, renovated buildings, and even worked as a rail-line construction worker. The privilege I had was that I ended up in a country where I was allowed to work temporarily even though I was an Aduro. It was a battle, paying lawyers to fight my case and using that to buy time to actualize my goals. I would not "chase" white girls to get residency paper as was/is common. I just could not do that even though I had couple of white and black (African origin) girl friends. One of my black girl-friends actually had it in her little mind that I was going out with her in order to get "paper". But I was always clear about my motive and plan. I remember telling her that I was not planning to stay there because I do not see my future in such a country. Another "half-cast" African origin young divorcee who was only 3 yrs older than I was willing to give me "paper" on a platter of goal. I was adamant that I have to follow through with my plan. By the time God in his grace and mercy had worked out my plan for me, I was already been told by the authorities to leave their country. I was even bundled (not forcefully though) to the Nigeria embassy in order to collect documents to expedite my deportation. Yes, I went to the embassy with them, and even told the worker I spoke with at the embassy that I was working on a plan that they should issue the document only after some weeks. After then, I already had a letter of admission to start a paid Masters degree in another English-speaking country. I'd worked like "jack" and saved up to 20000 Deutschmark (I kept all my funds with a cousin living in Germany, though I did not live in Germany). I did not do drugs, I worked and saved funds for almost 2yrs of working. At a point they collected my work-permit and were paying me "pea-nuts" allowance. Okay with me because my plan was almost through. My Nigerian friends laughed at me that I was not buying clothes for myself and that I would just "die" (that is exactly what a friend, said).

Even before the Nigeria travel document was issued to expedite my travel back home, I boldly walked to the immigration authority by myself one beautiful summer day. I told the guy responsible for my case that I was ready to go home and he thought he did not hear me well. I repeated myself, and he proposed that I should come back after few days. I returned after few days, and he took me seriously and set a travel date for me to take a flight to Nigeria. I kept the date. My "half-cast" girlfriend cried like hell with the hope that I would change my mind. I did not. On the day, I kept my appointment with the authorized guy who was to escort me to the airport. My girlfriend also escorted me. I would say I was not deported, the guy simply released my tickets and other travel documents to me and each time we passed an immigration point at the airport he would speak to the immigration worker on my behalf. I finally said good bye to my girlfriend and after the last immigration control point I was let go by myself to take the plane with all the dignity in me. I arrived home at the airport and was not bothered much when I presented a traveling certificate to the Nigerian immigration. I was let go without a trouble.

With my letter of admission in hand I faced the embassy of the country I was supposed to travel to, to begin my higher studies. God in his grace made them issued a student visa to me. I had enough funds, though not in my name but in a German bank with a letter from the mum of my cousin saying that the fund is for my education. I knew that if I had presented a bank account in my name I had no evidence of working in Nigeria. On the whole I spent additional 3-months in Nigeria.

After an additional 6yrs of post-graduate education in the country I traveled to, with a PhD degree I did not have to pay a dime for, each time I look back I thank good God that he made me make the right decisions. Now, if I release my name for you to "google", you like those who knew me in those days I was struggling will find it hard to believe how a 'jack' like me ended up working with the best science research groups in the world with my name as an author of impressive scientific publications. Now I work with one of the largest company in the world with a 6-figure salary. And you know what, God is not done with me yet because I still have to keep to my ultimate goal which I set back then. Run a company of my own, and where will that be in? In Nigeria of course. So I will be giving up all the comfort and highly paid salary to follow-up my dream and plan again. I know God will not fail me because I he did not fail me before now, and because he has led me this far, he would not fail me now because all along I let Him know what my ultimate goal is.

So, Timothy and others in similar situation. Be bold and make decisions that others would think that you are probably crazy taking. Set your mind on something to keep you busy while God fight your cause. I remember a point then when my transcript was not released by the university I went to in Nigeria because I had sent a friend to collect it for me. I decided I was going to Nigeria to collect it myself and one of my friend said I was crazy. He recommended that I should instead travel illegally to Ireland and that he could help arrange my travel there. Thank God the transcript was eventually released, and I did not have to go to Nigeria earlier than planned. The lesson from all this is that, we Nigerians need to face and fight our "demons". And these "demons" (things keeping us back) are nowhere but all in Nigeria. Each of us only have one life and we need to start (and even fight) to live our dreams. There is nothing wrong with that. Because we all have dreams.

Although a very long account of your experience, I was very thrilled reading it. I am very happy for you, and hope you keep flying till you reach that place which you have always wanted to reach.

A PhD degree can indeed open doors, no doubt about that.

Congrats again.

T22
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by mpmp: 3:05pm On Feb 08, 2012
q1) did Nigeria send Timothy on an errand to the Netherlands?
ans: No

q2) Timothy says he is an enemy of the state. Did we influence his decision to become an enemy of the state?
answer: No

q3) even those of us who have not declared ourselves as an enemy of the state dont have food to eat. We dont have light, we dont have water. How much more those who made themselves enemies of our state.
answer: that is their problem o.

Even if he isnt a real member of MEND, he could say hes a MEND member just for the purpose of sympathy by the Netherland government.

With males, its even better. How much more with females. Sitting in a taxi in Europe, I was once offered to choose a Nigerian lady to spend some time with. I declined, only for the taxi driver to hand me a small magazine with bikini clad ladies whose names rang Nneka, Tina, Ngozi, Evelyn, Rose, ChiChi and co. I was like, what the fnck!
Re: For Nigerian Illegals In The Netherlands, It Is A Tough And Risky Life by nagoma(m): 3:19pm On Feb 08, 2012
He deserves it. We don't have Dutch illegal immigrants here in Nigeria .

(0) (1) (Reply)

UK Set To Deport A Gay Nigerian Asylum Seeker Who Fled Nigeria 8 Years Ago / Another Nigerian Jailed For Sham Marriages In The Uk / Nigerian Passengers Denied Entry Into South Africa

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2014 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See Nairalist and How To Advertise. 179
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.