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Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 3:10pm On Apr 18
gregyboy:


You again all this Runaway Yoruba cowards of a male... Living toa11 to be constantly bleeped by bini men everytime she lies
You fit bleep Tao? Empty head like you. Swear that you do not wish she was Bini debating against Yoruba. She is the best in dealing with block heads like you from Edo. grin

8 Likes

Politics / Re: Patami And The Hypocrisy Of The Igbos And Yorubas by nisai: 2:18pm On Apr 18
thebosstrevor1:
Most Southerners hate Northerners we can all see from different social media fight, the truth is many Northerners don't care about what goes on in the South, they just live their lives, they are not OBSESSIVE like the way, southerners are to Northerners problems.

One of the most intriguing things about the south is most are political robots, paid robots, who can be used for anything.

On April 2 2021, IPOB Terrorist leader, Nnamdi Kanu, said that Bokoharam was peaceful until the government started killing them..

In 2009, when Yaradua was in power, Patami criticized the government for killing bokoharam members, he said it was extra judicial killings, in 2011, bokoharam went violent against the government of Nigeria.

What is the difference between the statement of Nnamdi Kanu and Patami, this shows that some forces in the south want to make this a tribal issue with the help of the southern political robots on social media in conjunction with the yoruba media to plot the removal of the Honourable Minister of Technology as a revenge for the resignation of Kemi Adeosun who is yoruba.
Everything now has to be Yoruba media.
Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 2:07pm On Apr 18
Simbrixton:
the truth is if oba made a public statement on the issue like ooni did you for see wetin itsekiris go talk they have no influence whatsoever in warri pay less attention to this bini trolls
Lol.

1 Like

Politics / Re: Western Nigeria Development And News Thread by nisai: 4:23am On Apr 18
Kapeter:
I have so many news to share. But time na the wahala and also my phone is bad for now. So many developmental project going on across Yorubaland. Anyway, we are getting Shoprite for sure in addition to our very own Justrite and the rally today was a success. Huge one at that.
Any time u get time try update us abeg.
Travel / Re: Citizenship. Which Should I Choose Between Nigeria Vs Cameroon by nisai: 4:21am On Apr 18
joefelin2345:
You better choose Congo Brazzaville.
Haha grin Why now?
Politics / Re: History: Legacy Of Islam In Yorubaland by nisai: 6:57pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
I’d try. smiley

This would get technical, but I trust that you would be able to follow through.


In the light of my earlier comment, the popular idea that the name “Yoruba” originated from some alleged derogatory remark by Sultan Bello - blah-blah - actually has no leg to stand on.

The name “Yoruba” (in reference to Yoruba-speaking peoples) is evidently more antique than the first Fulani emirate in our region. This is evident from the 1600s Timbuktu writings which makes reference to this name.

As has been shown, the name “Yoruba” (in reference to the Yoruba-speaking peoples) predates the 1600s — to have been a well-known pre-existing name in as far as Mali since the early 1600s.

Now, given these two backgrounds, namely: 1) the false-exogeneity of this name, and 2) its considerable antiquity; it logically follows then that any attempt at its etymological components need not be a 100% certainty — and that is okay for an antique name from a pre-literate society.

In fact, many literate cultures do not have a 100% certainty whatsoever as per the etymological components of their “groups’ names”, and that’s okay too. These names are also antique — e.g. “London”, “Japan”, amongst innumerable others.

The fairest possible original one may then arrive at for the present-day indigenous name, “Yoruba”, is via one or both of the following approaches:

1) A careful consideration of the syllabic-components of the present-day name in the light of the relevant historical and linguistic realities.

2) An examination of what the received traditions have to say regarding the etymology of the name — if any such received traditions on its etymology exist.

Starting with the second:
Actually, some received traditions exist regarding the etymological components of the name “Yoruba”.

The Reverend Samuel Ajayi Crowther, in the 1800s, collected a tradition from among the Egbas which says that an earlier phrase from which this name arises is the phrase: “Ori Obba”.

I am yet to lay my hands on the material itself. I got this from a secondary source which has proven to me to be 100% trustworthy.

I am thus not yet able to access any further remark he may have passed regarding this account which he got from the Egbas.


Regarding the first:
I have to begin with a disclaimer. I do not claim to have originally come up with this observation.

However, I did expound it beyond the very cursory highlight penned by its author — the columnist, Farouk Martins Omo Aresa.

In the name “Yoruba”, Omo Aresa spotted the basic components: Oyo & Oba — “OYO-OBA, OYO-ROBA, OYO-RUBA”.

He remarked briefly on how this flows from Yoruba “orikis”, and he expressed a subtle regret on how this has gone unnoticed by many.

Now, I find this view to be highly explanatory not merely because of those two components.

Rather, those two components fit very nicely into the relevant historical and linguistic realities.

Firstly, the phrase: “Oyo is the King” (in the sense of Oyo as the new sheriff in town) fits nicely with the fact that “Oyo” was the core Yoruba polity which succeeded Ife after Ife’s military and commercial decline in the early/mid-1400s.

~ Robin Horton, (1979), p. 141.

The phrase “Oyo is the King” is thus rooted in an endogenous Oyo attitude which must have begun as early as the late-1400s following Ife’s decline as the Yoruba power in the Guinea Forest from the early/mid-1400s.

Secondly, this phrase: “Oyo is the King” apparently continued when Oyo embarked on actual imperial programs (which gradually saw the Alaafin of Oyo as the proud overlord over other kingdoms too) right after the successful return of the capital from Oyo-Igboho back to Oyo-Ile in the late 1500s.

Thirdly, having began to dominate other Yoruba kingdoms from the late-1500s; the phrase “Oyo is the king” must therefore have taken the shape of a proper appellation which is now no longer restricted only to the Oyo-subgroup of the Yoruba group.

This explains Ahmad Baba’s reference to the name “Yoruba” (as a group’s name — rather than a fraction of a group) in the year 1615. His reference indicates a well-known pre-existing group name.

This also explains why (in the early 1800s) many former Oyo tributaries (after their independence from Oyo) initially refused to re-adopt this apparently ‘hegemonic’ group name.

Fourthly, turning to the linguistic angle; it may seem unrealistic that a Yoruba translation of the phrase, “Oyo is the King”, would come any close to the name “Yoruba”.

Yes, without a careful and deep consideration, the translation “Oyo ni Oba” is all one would get from the phrase: “Oyo is the King”.

And that doesn't seem anywhere close to the name “Yoruba” — especially considering the fact that “ni” is the Yoruba equivalent of the English word “is”.

So, while the historical side appears consistent all along so far; the linguistic angle seems to suggest a grave hole which demolishes this explanation.

But as will soon be seen, there is actually no linguistic hole at all in this explanation.

Fifthly, the translation of the word “is” (in the phrase: “Oyo is the king” ) as “ni” (in Yoruba language) actually ignores a key fact.

This translation ignores the fact that the present-day Yoruba equivalent of “is” (which is “ni“ ) was not unchanging over the centuries up till present-day.

For example, the (1800s) writings of Rev. Samuel Crowther shows the word “li” to be a Yoruba equivalent of the English word “is” in the 1800s.

In the light of this 1800s fact, the phrase: “Oyo is the King” would have been translated as “Oyo li Oba” using the 1800s’ realities.

If this was the evolving reality between the 1800s and now; what then would have been the Yoruba equivalent of “is” in the actual period of our interest — i.e. the 1400s and the 1500s??

To delve into this distant past of our language, recourse has to be made to an established fact in linguistic analysis, which is that:

(1) The present differentiated dialects of a language were actually more undifferentiated and more uniform the farther back in time you go.

In specific terms, all the present-day dialectal differentiations of the Yoruba language were actually more undifferentiated 100 years ago. And they are even more undifferentiated 200 years ago, and so forth into the past.

This linguistic fact would soon prove to be very useful for our deconstruction and regress.

(2) In addition to the foregoing linguistic fact, another observation among present-day Yoruba dialects which would also prove very useful is the fact that some Yoruba dialects have proven very, very stable over time.

These relatively stable dialects are those which must be resorted to in order to reasonably unravel what the Yoruba language must have uniformly sounded like many centuries ago.

These ‘stable’ dialects are found along the southern, eastern and south-eastern Yoruba frontiers. To be very precise, some of them are the Ijebu and the Itsekiri dialects of the Yoruba language, among others in the region.

This is well-known to linguists, but to spotlight some instances of this fact; some Yoruba words are alive till date among all Yorubas, but only in usage — their meanings have generally been lost to time.

However, these words are preserved intact till date in both usage and meaning in the Ijebu dialect for example.

The Yoruba word ”Ùwà”, as in “Alaiyeluwa”, is an example in this regard. It is a considerably antique Yoruba word.

Another category are Yoruba words whose usage are generally lost and even replaced by other words — but only remembered to have once been in use.

The Yoruba word “Olùkù” which has been completely replaced by another word (though remembered to have once been in use) is an example in this regard.

This word is still alive in meaning and in everyday usage in the Ijebu dialect of the Yoruba language.

These among some more technical reasons explains the resort to the Ijebu dialect in an attempt to establish what a more uniform and undifferentiated Yoruba language would have sounded like many centuries ago.

In the light of this approach, the phrase “Oyo is the King” in the Ijebu dialect (which is our dialectal yardstick for a uniform Yoruba language of the 1400s) translates simply as:

Oyo ri Oba” (in writing) and “Oyo r’Oba” (orally).

Cheers!

Cc: LegendHero, SuperBold, illicit, SouthNigerian, SaintBeehot, gomojam, DenreleDave, reallest, TimeManager, RuggedSniper, Ihateniggov, HedwigesMaduro, haffaze777, googi
I am enlightened. Thanks for this.

2 Likes 1 Share

Politics / Re: History: Legacy Of Islam In Yorubaland by nisai: 6:55pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
Good write-up! In any case, I’d like to correct some ‘mistakes’ in this write up:

(1) The word “Yoruba” did not originate in Ahmad Baba’s “Mi’raj al-Su’ud”, or in any of his essays.

To originate a word is to coin such word.

The Timbuktu writer, Ahmad Baba (in that essay) simply made reference to different groups of people using their well-known pre-existing names.

The embedded screenshot right below shows a scan of the manuscript folio in question from his original Arabic essay written in the early 1600s.

www.nairaland.com/attachments/12934148_5117c6d550154217817d7c66b5fa0fe6_jpeg_jpeg2a73d5172c14cf7a7da91ff200688e3e

The embedded screenshot which follows below shows a translation of the relevant section of the above Arabic original.

This translation below was prepared by John Hunwick and Fatima Harrak for The Institute of African Studies Rabat, Morocco in the year 2000.

www.nairaland.com/attachments/12934147_3336ed29985b499e82c4e140b455b9fa_jpeg_jpeg62ecafabb59c692d4ba471597fdf16bb

Clearly, the text shows from its phrasing [viz. “... the group called ... Yoruba ...”] that this is a well-known pre-existing name.

Ahmad Baba didn’t name us, neither did he name any of the ten groups in that listing.



(2) Yes Ahmad Baba wrote “Mi’raj al-Su’ud”, but not in the year 1627 (in case that was assumed).

Rather, this specific essay was written in the year 1615 in response to some inquiries on enslaving black people.

The Arabic text of “Mi’raj al Su’ud” contains the precise year [and month] of its writing (in the Islamic/Hijri calendar obviously) as highlighted in the embedded folio below.

www.nairaland.com/attachments/13082305_6e49d8d129844a578af9272699e1586a_jpeg_jpeg2d5891d724a6428e2c0f4e6898bd60cc

The highlight in this folio (which is simply the “verso” of the earlier attached folio) basically shows the wording (in translation): “[The year] one thousand and twenty four [of the Hijrah]”.

When converted from this Hijri “AH” calendar into the Gregorian “CE” calendar; the year 1024AH falls into the year 1615CE.

The well-known formula “G = 0.9692*H + 622” proves sufficiently useful for this conversion.

In the light of my above expositions from Ahmad Baba’s essay of the year 1615, the anachronism and contradiction of the Sultan Bello Coinage myth thus becomes very obvious.

For emphasis, the year 1615 (Ahmad Baba) comes before the year 1837 (Sultan Bello). Lol.

And the word “Yoruba” (as the group name for Yoruba-speaking peoples) has been in existence prior to Baba himself as has been observed in that essay.

What then is the word “Yarriba”, or “Yarba”, etc., and what is its connection with Sultan Bello??

Captain Hugh Clapperton who was an acquaintance of Sultan Bello of Sokoto informs us in his 1829 publication on this.

He noted that “Yarriba” is simply the Arab’s and the Hausa’s articulation of the evidently pre-existing name “Yoruba”. To quote Clapperton’s precise words, he writes:

Having seen the whole of the baggage off, we started in the evening, and proceeded on our journey. We learned in fact that we were not now in the king of Badagry's territory, but in a district of Eyeo [Ọ̀yọ́], which is called Yarriba by the Arabs and people of Houssa, and that the name of the capital is called Katunga, and that it is thirty days' journey.

~ Captain Hugh Clapperton; “Journal of a Second Expedition Into the Interior of Africa”; (1829), p. 4.


Furthermore, Bishop Samuel Ajayi Crowther also writing in the 1800s makes a note to this same foregoing effect when he writes as follows:

European Travellers obtained the name Katanga from Hausa People. Yarriba, or Yaruba, is likewise the Hausa pronunciation: Yoruba would be more correct.

~ Reverend Ajayi Crowther; “A Grammar of The Yoruba Language”; (1852), p. i.



In summary, the name “Yoruba” did not originate in the writings of Ahmad Baba in the 1600s. Neither, obviously, did it originate in the writings of Arabs and Hausa-Fulanis in the 1800s.

As has been seen in Ahmad Baba’s essay from the year 1615, the name “Yoruba” (in reference to the Yoruba-speaking group) predates the 1600s.

It is evidently our endonym from a long time ago. Don’t be fooled by modern day propaganda, people.


Cheers!

Cc: LegendHero, SuperBold, chrisxxx, PoliteActivist, kingbee90, illicit, FortifiedCity, Guestlander, SouthNigerian, dvdwed, Ideadoctor, SaintBeehot, gomojam, DenreleDave, reallest, TimeManager, RuggedSniper
Hmmm. Well done.

3 Likes 1 Share

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 6:38pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
grin O ka re na ye! M je ri e. grin


Mma ju awon linki okan ri ibe we neyin, ko le mo idi ri mi shey biro ibere yen.
Oda.
Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 6:32pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
To! e ne-ejo niyen oo. smiley

Olorun a pon iwo ne le. smiley

Ibere ri mi fe biro ri fo: Nje ole tunmo oro we ri ede Ijebu:? “Oyo is the King”.

Oyo ri oba.
Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 6:25pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
Mi-m biro re oo.

Koda mi mentionu re ni igbokan-wa yen nigbi mi fe biro fo ko ba mi tunmo oro kan si Ijebu.

Sugbon mi ri fo ko fesi.

Anyways, baratishey?
Ah! Mi riii. Bi m se ma ri ipe re ki m ma yinnu? We ma mu iyi ara re oo.

Mo wa dada. Inu mi dun fo wo yi wa nibe nitorifo awon alaraka yen uro won po. grin

4 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 6:08pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
Eso e, omo iye mi. cheesy
Tao wo se mi. We biro mi, we le fun mi ni mentionu grin

3 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 6:06pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
No notes prove your right, bald head.

We hope that before the world comes to an end, we would find where your map says Itsekiris are Benin people. grin

Cc: nisai
I never took him serious. I know he is your customer grin

4 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 5:57pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
I know the fool he is.

He reeks of insecurity.

I spit on his bald head.
Haba! Tao11, Ki da se? Iwe i poju. grin
Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 5:55pm On Apr 17
Ofunwa111:









I am amazed you people do not know the person behind the moniker Truthshots2 is mentally unstable? He is the same person who uses the moniker "Nocomment" and "Nobody". He is from Oza Nagogo. He expects everyone in the South and some clans in the East of Nigeria to be of Edo origin. Then he goes about talking set theories and how many books he has written. cheesy cheesy
We know. His nemesis Tao11 is here to frustrate him with evidence and logic. He will soon get freaked out and delete his moniker when his lies do not thrive. Watch out. grin

4 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 5:49pm On Apr 17
Simbrixton:
ijebu right?
Yes, Ijebu waterside.

2 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 5:48pm On Apr 17
Truthshots2:

Both the ruling house and the ordinary people are from Benin heritage.
You have no regard for evidence whatsoever. You just form tales in your head to suit your battered ego hoping it becomes authentic.

You are worse than a dictator!

6 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 5:43pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
And the Itsekiri ruling house considers itself to be an-initio from Ile-Ife.

So, Itsekiris as a whole (both the general populace and the ruling house) all admit to be Yoruba.
Gbam!

6 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 5:43pm On Apr 17
Simbrixton:
we have rejected dem everywhere in fact the crisis in ologbo was engineered because we voiced our support for oduduwa republic
Of course. The itsekiri people are head and shoulder above them in all ramification. Don't you notice the Itsekiris do things with logic and calculation unlike the rest that reeks of emotion and brute.

I am from Ogun state where some Itsekiris migrated from.

7 Likes 1 Share

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 5:01pm On Apr 17
TAO11:
Ogbeni carry your insecure ass out of this thread and stop trying too hard to compensate for your inferiority complex.

Cc: sangresan
grin grin grin

2 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 4:38pm On Apr 17
Simbrixton:
you mean the itsekiris in ibadan currently campaigning for oodua republic bros abeg go rest
Nice.

3 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 12:34pm On Apr 17
Simbrixton:
Tsola is omoba already the matter dan die already no need to stress una self
Sure, bro.

1 Like

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 12:26pm On Apr 17
Simbrixton:
i am maternally itsekiri please it is spelt itshekiri not itsekiri
Seems you mistakenly interchanged it but I got you. We are one.

1 Like

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 12:24pm On Apr 17
KingOKON:
.

Which may be true but then the royal households may claim otherwise and they have their followers too.
The basics here is what is the established form of kingship and are they willing to change the old order

* There are places in Nigeria where affinity is to the mother side, Ogoni is one*
Let's wait till they (the royal household) do that then. The Yoruba respect decision and not landgrabbers.

Per your second paragraph, check the link below.

https://www.independent.ng/olu-of-warri-stool-why-prince-tsola-emiko-was-disqualified/
Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 12:11pm On Apr 17
Truthshots2:

The only people whom are truly Yoruba are the people of oyo Kingdom.
Nobody else is actually Yoruba.
You this Benin boy again! I go call your lecturer, Tao11 for you.

Tao12. Don't run or delete your moniker when she arrives oooo grin

6 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 12:03pm On Apr 17
KingOKON:
.


Who is an Itshekiri?
One with Itshekiri Father and Mother
Or Itshekiri Father and Benin Mother
Or Itshekiri father and Yoruba mother

Itshekiri is a Yoruba subgroup. Whether you have Benin, Igala, Ebira, chinese, Korean or even Masai mother doesn't matter, Nigeria practise patriachy, so you belong to your father's identity by default.

Ishekiris are Yoruba and they have never denied that.

6 Likes

Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 11:41am On Apr 17
Simbrixton:
i mentioned his mum being yoruba because most of his boys are from okitipupa the reason u are speaking a lot of ignorance with confidence is because you dont know
Are you an Itshekiri?
Culture / Re: Warri Succession Crisis: Oba Of Benin Wades In, Meets Ologbotsere by nisai: 10:27am On Apr 17
scholes0:


All na semantics and unnecessary ping pong.

If you like say Yorubas are Itsekiri, if you like say Itsekiris are Yoruba, nothing spoil. we own ourselves. They are welcome on OUR LAND for FREE They can claim all 50 million of us... we dey for them!
O smart gan wallahi grin

3 Likes

Culture / Re: Itsekiris Finally Discard 1979 Edict Insist That They Are Yorubas Not Bini by nisai: 5:44pm On Apr 13
Olu317:
I sight you bro. ágọ lá pá ọmá kunrín Ẹdo yẹ..


Cheers.
grin grin grin

Beeni.

1 Like

Culture / Re: Itsekiris Finally Discard 1979 Edict Insist That They Are Yorubas Not Bini by nisai: 4:12pm On Apr 13
Olu317:
Your ignorace is beyond redemption . How can you compare Yoruba tradition with your Nigeria or Bini? Obviously , you are ignorant.
Lol. Olu, you got him.

1 Like

Culture / Re: Itsekiris Finally Discard 1979 Edict Insist That They Are Yorubas Not Bini by nisai: 4:00pm On Apr 13
Ogungbemi01:

We don't want the anti Yoruba rule, it is a ploy by the Binis to separate us from our brothers. Since they use mid west to separate us from the West, Binis have been trying to annex our land in Edo State. We don't understand Bini language neigther does Bini understand our language. If you cast a news in Yoruba language in Itsekiri area, every body will understand what the news caster is saying . Likewise if the news is read in Itsekiri. They connive with some self centered Itsekiri leaders to produce the vexecious edict. Omadino people are from Ode in Ogun state while Ugborodo people are from Ugbo in Ondo state. How will you convince Omadinor people that a child born by their sister from Ogun state is not qualified to sit on the throne in a kingdom where they are major stake holders? How do you also convince Ugborodo people who are the highest oil producers in Delta State that their sister from Ondo state cannot give birth to a king to rule over their land? In fact the edict is very annoying to our people. No body want to hear it. The people have trashed the edict.
Well done. I am from Ogun state. The Itshekiris are our brothers.

1 Like

Politics / Re: 2023: Tinubu Presidency Will Help Oduduwa Republic – Fani-kayode by nisai: 3:36pm On Apr 08
Boda FFK no get shame.
Crime / Re: Imo State Police Headquarters attacked, Burned (Video) by nisai: 8:30am On Apr 05
Weathered:
All eyes looking at ESN and rightly so.

The recent attack on police facilities and personell only started after the it's formation by the coward and terrorist called Nnamdi kalu.

Any Igbo who believes in this rogue and senseless idiot is the biggest fool of the century.

There's no difference between the bastard and that of herdsmen.

How many Igbo lives and business will be lost before the bastard takes responsibility that his tactics is criminal and ineffective?

The same violence that boko haram had employed for over 10 years only ended up destryiotheir region and lives and innocent citizens and their business.

Now this demented albino armed with all the foolhardiness of the east is trying to destry the East and the People in it.

Woe unto Nnamdi kalu, the demented coward despot.
You speak wisdom............ This service of truth should be sufficient to humanity forever. We hope he listened.

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