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Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary - Culture (22) - Nairaland

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Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 2:45am On Sep 14, 2012
I just checked with my dictionary, since I was in doubt after your comment. It does say onirele means peaceful (peace = irele). But peaceful is synonym with calm, so their meaning is very similar. When it comes to jeje, it also says that when used as an adverb, it means peacefully/quietly. And according to this book,http://books.google.no/books?id=CzUV4oKBiSIC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=jokoje+yoruba&source=bl&ots=rGwHC8hVWV&sig=qZwOlAFglbj5XYvM3GhoVvUQKJc&hl=no#v=onepage&q=jokoje%20&f=false
jokoje means sit quiet(ly). So I believe this is just a case of synonym-crashing, and nuances in the language when it comes to meaning. All in all, languages can rarely be translated with 100% accuracy, so I would think in this case no one is wrong.
So after my research, written Yoruba or standard Yoruba (it's based mostly on Oyo and Ibadan dialects, but there are aspects from other dialects as well), so it might differ a little bit from the spoken dialects, and it that case, the blame is on me.


Also, how would you say "all is calm/peaceful now"? as asked previously.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 6:29pm On Sep 15, 2012
StarFlux: I just checked with my dictionary, since I was in doubt after your comment. It does say onirele means peaceful (peace = irele). But peaceful is synonym with calm, so their meaning is very similar. When it comes to jeje, it also says that when used as an adverb, it means peacefully/quietly. And according to this book,http://books.google.no/books?id=CzUV4oKBiSIC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=jokoje+yoruba&source=bl&ots=rGwHC8hVWV&sig=qZwOlAFglbj5XYvM3GhoVvUQKJc&hl=no#v=onepage&q=jokoje%20&f=false
jokoje means sit quiet(ly). So I believe this is just a case of synonym-crashing, and nuances in the language when it comes to meaning. All in all, languages can rarely be translated with 100% accuracy, so I would think in this case no one is wrong.
So after my research, written Yoruba or standard Yoruba (it's based mostly on Oyo and Ibadan dialects, but there are aspects from other dialects as well), so it might differ a little bit from the spoken dialects, and it that case, the blame is on me.


Also, how would you say "all is calm/peaceful now"? as asked previously.
Ok o my friend and goodluck in your Yoruba adventure. Don't hesitate to seek my help if you need. Odabo oremi.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 9:26pm On Sep 15, 2012
StarFlux:


Also, how would you say "all is calm/peaceful now"? as asked previously.
it depend on the context or cercomstance. Eg if it is a response to greeting or question you will say (dada ni gbogbo re bayi) means 'all fine/peaceful/good now', however if it is within statments you can say 'bayi gbogbo re nu se jeje/daradara/iroru'. Which means all is calm/good/peaceful/well now. We use all ds words interchangably denpending on the cercumstance.
NOTE: all this interpretation are common yoruba spoken on the street, it may differ abit from litrary yoruba, and becarefull because i did not put the signs.
Se jeje O
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by Chimaaba: 9:51pm On Sep 15, 2012
Salut.

Would someone be willing and graceful to assist me to put the following into Igbo - as a gift for my father?

Father you have fought well!
As a child I looked up to you,
But I am now a man, so I walk my own path and make my own decisions.

Because of you, I honor our ancestors and love my people.
I will follow your example, and serve Ndi-Igbo.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by odumchi: 10:12pm On Sep 15, 2012
Chimaaba: Salut.

Would someone be willing and graceful to assist me to put the following into Igbo - as a gift for my father?

Father you have fought well!
As a child I looked up to you,
But I am now a man, so I walk my own path and make my own decisions.

Because of you, I honor our ancestors and love my people.
I will follow your example, and serve Ndi-Igbo.

Here you go:

Nna m, i luola ogu ofuma!
Mgbe m bu nwata m no na-ele gi anya,
Kama ugbua awu m nwoke, ya mee m na na-ejere onwe m na-eme kwa ihe na uche onwe m.

Maka gi m na akwanyere ndi nna nna anyi ugwu na ahu kwa ndi anyi na anya.

Aga m eso ume gi aruru ndi Igbo oru.

1 Like

Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by ifyalways(f): 8:10am On Sep 17, 2012
@Starflux and Seunfly,the all is calm now was actually my translation for Adetutu for which someone claimed it wasn't right.

So,how would you guys translate the name Adetutu ?
smiley
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 1:11pm On Sep 17, 2012
ifyalways: @Starflux and Seunfly,the all is calm now was actually my translation for Adetutu for which someone claimed it wasn't right.

So,how would you guys translate the name Adetutu ?
smiley

Ade means crown, tutu means cold. But tutu can be use figuratively to mean gentle, easily, calmly, sweet, peacefully and sometimes abusive(not smart). But in this context, Adetutu mean gentle crown(name given to girls).
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by ifyalways(f): 10:55am On Sep 18, 2012
seunfly: Ade means crown, tutu means cold. But tutu can be use figuratively to mean gentle, easily, calmly, sweet, peacefully and sometimes abusive(not smart). But in this context, Adetutu mean gentle crown(name given to girls).

Eche.Men also bear Adetutu,no?
Thanks. smiley
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 12:59am On Sep 23, 2012
Hello!

I have a new question.

It says in my book that láti dé means "to come back", but I thought the correct word was láti bò(ọ) or láti padà wá. It seems to be contradicting itself, unless these words means the same thing.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 10:37pm On Sep 23, 2012
StarFlux: Hello!

I have a new question.

It says in my book that láti dé means "to come back", but I thought the correct word was láti bò(ọ) or láti padà wá. It seems to be contradicting itself, unless these words means the same thing.


de means arrive, bo means on is way back or return, wa means come. But de and bo can mean thesame thing depending on how u use them, while you can also use wa to mean(de or bo) since it is direct opposite in meaning u just need to twist the sentenses for ur meaning. Eg oti pada wa ile( he/she has come back home) ohun bo wa ile( he/she is coming home) oti de ile(he/she has reach home.
In the first example note "pada" which negate the word wa this give it a new meaning. Therefore they all mean the same thing but can't use them in the same way. Lati de and lati bo means to arrive and to return which still mean same thing.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 1:54pm On Sep 24, 2012
Thank you so much, Seanfly!

Your help is invaluable.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by DuduNegro: 11:38pm On Sep 24, 2012
Bareena: Hello everybody,

I am new to the forum and new to Yoruba language. Anybody here who is willing to help me translate the following Yoruba words / names? If they can be translated into English. I was told a lot of words can't be translated literally. But there might be a way to describe or explain them. Even though that would be in a perhaps "clumsy" way. Many thanks in advance...

• Inukogun
• Awofusi
• Atikaresete
• Omipensen-akodun-koro
• Keke
• Oritoteere
• Adiloye
• Adetutu
• Eka
• Jokoje
• Ikase
• Osikaleka
• Olabosipo
• Onimeri-Apala

The words in here are lifted from Ifa manuscript....these are not street vernacular words. Their translation must be done within the context in which they occured. Unlike European words which are conceptual.........Yoruba words are functional to the aspect of life they address. Meaning is distorted qhen you criss cross a functional word to give it conceptual attributes. You can only come out with what is close but never the exact.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 2:04am On Oct 01, 2012
Hello, again!

I was listening to dami duro by Davido, and was wondering what exactly it means.
I know duro means stop, and mi - me, so I assume ema dami duro means don't try to stop me, followed by the emi omo baba olowo (I'm a rich man's/father's son) but what does the da in dami mean?

I looked up try/attempt and i I found dan and da aba, so maybe the da is dan, so it means try? Would make sense. The reason I'm in doubt is because all the words set together is what I find very hard to learn.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by ifyalways(f): 7:06am On Oct 01, 2012
StarFlux: Hello, again!

I was listening to dami duro by Davido, and was wondering what exactly it means.
I know duro means stop, and mi - me, so I assume ema dami duro means don't try to stop me, followed by the emi omo baba olowo (I'm a rich man's/father's son) but what does the da in dami mean?

I looked up try/attempt and i I found dan and da aba, so maybe the da is dan, so it means try? Would make sense. The reason I'm in doubt is because all the words set together is what I find very hard to learn.

Interesting. Let me quickly add/ask.

Pa da wa/wa pa da= come/bring back(not 100% accurate)

Da wa pa da =

NB:my sentence structure 'might' not be right.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 8:44am On Oct 01, 2012
StarFlux: Hello, again!

I was listening to dami duro by Davido, and was wondering what exactly it means.
I know duro means stop, and mi - me, so I assume ema dami duro means don't try to stop me, followed by the emi omo baba olowo (I'm a rich man's/father's son) but what does the da in dami mean?

I looked up try/attempt and i I found dan and da aba, so maybe the da is dan, so it means try? Would make sense. The reason I'm in doubt is because all the words set together is what I find very hard to learn.

you are correct, also
DA can be use to express something in process or process of something. To me it's more of technical rather than having a peculia meaning something like "is".

NOTE my interpretation is base on my opinion street language usage and may not be the real linguistic analysis so you may have to consult language expert.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 11:50pm On Oct 01, 2012
I see. Thank you for giving me some insight! I really appreciate it.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 9:59pm On Oct 04, 2012
Hello!

I don't understand the following:

Iya mi yoo fun mi l'owo. What does the l' mean? I'm aware of the ellisions which can mean say, at and be from "ni" or l without the ' which means have. I can fully understand the sentence as a whole, but the l' puzzles me.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 11:05pm On Oct 04, 2012
StarFlux: Hello!

I don't understand the following:

Iya mi yoo fun mi l'owo. What does the l' mean? I'm aware of the ellisions which can mean say, at and be from "ni" or l without the ' which means have. I can fully understand the sentence as a whole, but the l' puzzles me.


l is a short form of ni. Just like "can not" = can't. But this happen alot in yoruba words/sentence. Eg mo ni owo = mo l owo, mohun lo ile = mohun lo le, mo na owo = mo na wo.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 11:26pm On Oct 04, 2012
seunfly:

l is a short form of ni. Just like "can not" = "can't" note "not" turn to "t". But this happen alot in yoruba words/sentence. Eg mo ni owo = mo l owo, mohun lo ile = mohun lo le, mo na owo = mo na wo, ni owo turn to l owo.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 11:29pm On Oct 04, 2012
Yes, I am aware.

My book says l' (ni) means either be, say or at (a place). So, what does l'owo mean? For example: l'oja (at market). The meaning is clear to me, but in l'owo it is not.

Iya mi yoo fun mi l'owo. My mother will give money. I don't understand why l' has to be added to this sentence.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by Emerald988(f): 5:42pm On Oct 18, 2012
Pls someone should translate 'how are u dis evening' in yoruba for me.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 3:14am On Oct 19, 2012
Emerald988: Pls someone should translate 'how are u dis evening' in yoruba for me.
Bawo l'irole? (How is the evening?)
There might be another way to say it.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by odumchi: 4:39am On Oct 19, 2012
StarFlux: Bawo l'irole? (How is the evening?)
There might be another way to say it.

A few months ago you were asking for advice on whether to study Yoruba or Edo and now it seems everything's going well. Nice progression, Starflux.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by seunfly: 6:46am On Oct 19, 2012
StarFlux: Bawo l'irole? (How is the evening?)
There might be another way to say it.
You are right, but you can simply remove the word irole from it since it is present. You don't need to specify except if it is past or future

example:
how is this evening?
If we are in evening already and you are just greeting you will say
BAWO NI?

But if you are enquiring about the past evening you will say

BAWO NI IROLE (ANON/ ijeta)?

But if you are making equiry of today's evening you will say

Bawo wo ni irole/ bawo ni irole oni?

So the translation will depend on the context of mind or sentence.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by amekaoti: 2:24am On Oct 22, 2012
hammer = okupia
- guitar = ubor
- window = Inkuzor
- door (the actual door, not "uzo", the doorway) = Mgbo, mbechi
- kitchen cabinet = uko
- crystal = ? (maybe m]'gbuke)= ozale
- or.gasm = eruro-oñu; mjiji-oñu
- snow = ayoroyi
- privacy = ino-iche; nozuga-iche
- network = akwu-olu
- towel = akwa-mmiri
- mascot mmangwu
- safe (the container) zeref
- change (monetary) mgbanwe
- logic itu mgbereji
- quarantine = igba mkpe
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by amekaoti: 11:29pm On Oct 22, 2012
Fulaman198: Thank you for the post. I am interested in learning more fulfulde. Do you all have a dictionary?
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by otokx(m): 11:39pm On Nov 05, 2012
nice thread here
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by Fulaman198(m): 5:45am On Nov 06, 2012
amekaoti: Fulaman198: Thank you for the post. I am interested in learning more fulfulde. Do you all have a dictionary?

No, there is no dictionary because there are too many Fulfulde/Pular dialects.
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by odumchi: 6:15am On Nov 06, 2012
Fulaman198:

No, there is no dictionary because there are too many Fulfulde/Pular dialects.

Generally, how intelligible are the dialects?
To what degree would a Fulani child born in Katsina, Nigeria understand the language of a Fulani child born in Gambia, if the two has not previously interacted?
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by Fulaman198(m): 7:13am On Nov 06, 2012
odumchi:

Generally, how intelligible are the dialects?
To what degree would a Fulani child born in Katsina, Nigeria understand the language of a Fulani child born in Gambia, if the two has not previously interacted?

If they are both Village/Nomadic Fulani they should be fine they should understand each other about 70 - 80% with some words being different due to neighbouring languages.

If they are both City dwelling Fulani where a Nigerian city dwelling Fulani is Hausanized, and the city dwelling Gambian Fulani is "Mandenized (Mande)" it could be an utter disaster where they would both have intense difficulty.

1 Like

Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by StarFlux: 4:44pm On Nov 06, 2012
Pulaar dictionary: http://www.amazon.com/Pulaar-English-English-Pulaar-Standard-Dictionary-Hippocrene/dp/0781804795/ref=pd_cp_b_0

There are Fulfulde ones, but they are rare and often out of print. You can see some of them here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=a9_sc_1?rh=i%3Astripbooks%2Ck%3Afulfulde&keywords=fulfulde&ie=UTF8&qid=1352217033

Scroll a bit down.
I'm sure you can find small online dictionaries though ^^,
Re: Nairaland Official Igbo, Hausa and Yoruba Dictionary by Fulaman198(m): 4:26am On Nov 07, 2012
StarFlux: Pulaar dictionary: http://www.amazon.com/Pulaar-English-English-Pulaar-Standard-Dictionary-Hippocrene/dp/0781804795/ref=pd_cp_b_0

There are Fulfulde ones, but they are rare and often out of print. You can see some of them here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=a9_sc_1?rh=i%3Astripbooks%2Ck%3Afulfulde&keywords=fulfulde&ie=UTF8&qid=1352217033

Scroll a bit down.
I'm sure you can find small online dictionaries though ^^,

Interesting, I stand corrected then

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