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I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by AloyEmeka9: 8:11am On Jun 01, 2009
I was a Doctor in Nigeria, now a Cleaner in Canada - Nigerian abroad - Lamentations Of Other Nigerian Professionals

Saturday, May 30, 2009
People leave their home country with a dream of living a better life. But they tend to be oblivious of the challenges or, more realistically put, obstacles lying ahead. Not all of them get success in this endeavour. In this compilation by LAOLU AFOLABI, the travails of Nigerian professionals and other foreign nationals in Canada are brought to the fore.





http://odili.net/news/source/2009/may/30/606.html

Canada is a land of 10 million square miles. Its population is below 30 million and its rate of growth is less than 0.9 per cent. In addition, the next-door neighbour country is the United States, which offers huge job opportunities.

For all these reasons, Canada suffers from human resource deficiency throughout the year. This country attracts millions of people from around the globe, regardless of religion, belief and ideology due to its easy immigration system. Peaceful coexistence and support from government have encouraged people around the globe to migrate to Canada.

Harsh Reality

Although Canada provides warm welcome to new immigrants, the job market behaves the opposite. The country tends to favour the ‘True Canadians’ who are your next generation offspring. The new immigrants face the harsh inbuilt dichotomy of the job market as it is impossible to get a job without experience in Canada which itself, cannot be gained without a job.

Falling into this vicious cycle, the new immigrants give up their last hope of getting a good job. So many immigrants, including taxi drivers, got Ph.D but had to engage in menial jobs, as there had been no job for them.

This is a fairly common phenomenon, which scares new applicants. Although this is not the very common situation, every applicant has to bear in mind that he/she has to go through a series of hardship in getting their desired jobs. Applicant has to be mentally and physically prepared for a long struggle to see him/herself in a desired position.

In Canada, services in various sectors such as engineering, medical and education are maintained by respective regulatory bodies through various acts. That is why a person who seeks a job as an engineer has to take a licence of professional engineering; medical professionals such as doctors have to take recourse of a long process for getting certified by the Medical of Canada; nurses have to undertake certified test; for accountants, CMA certificate is mandatory; for the teachers of primary and secondary levels, teachers’ certificate is required; IT specialists have to acquire certificate on various modules; pharmacists require certification in Pharmacy.

The boldness, perseverance and doggedness of many Nigerians, coupled with their native intelligence, often result in the emergence of very capable, exceptionally intelligent high achievers. When the playing field is level, Nigerians have a knack of shining in many areas of human endeavour, particularly in the ‘professions’ i.e. Accounting, Law, Academics, Computer Science, Medicine, Education, Engineering etc. Just pick up the graduation/commencement brochure of any US high school or college with Nigerian students and look at their rankings.

It is a great irony to many in the immigration field, and to newcomers themselves, a bitter joke. Canada has a shortage of skilled professionals, and yet thousands of internationally trained doctors, engineers, teachers and nurses are forced to deliver pizzas and drive taxis.

“What angers me is we are a capable people. We have the credentials. We just can’t get the jobs,” complained a Nigerian, who feels the government has shattered his hopes and dreams.

Last year, when Canada changed the way it selects immigrants, many were happy to see the end of the old system, which matched newcomers with worker shortages. Now, Canada chooses immigrants not on their occupation, but on their education, skills and language abilities. Applicants must score 67 of a possible 100 points to be accepted.

Ostensibly, being talented and smart should make them more employable. But it isn’t working out that way. Canada is recruiting the right kind of people, but they are stuck in a bottleneck, as the agencies and bodies that regulate the fields of Medicine, Teaching and Nursing struggle to assess their qualifications.

“We have a disaster on our hands,” says Joan Atlin, Executive Director of the Association of International Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario.

“There are thousands of under-employed foreign professionals across the country. At the same time, we have a shortage of skilled professionals, especially in the health-care field. We don’t so much have a doctor shortage as an assessment and licensing bottleneck,” she said.

A recent statistics in Canada which studies 164,200 immigrants who arrived between 2000 and 2001 found that 70 per cent had problems entering the labour force. Six in every 10 were forced to take jobs other than those they were trained to do. The two most common occupational groups for men were Science (natural and applied) and Management, but most ended up working in sales and service or processing and manufacturing.

There was a conference on the subject of Canadian experience and, in attendance, were dozens of foreign-trained professionals – some Nigerian bankers, doctors and engineers who are not working in their professions.

At the conference, the lamentations were, in summation: “We are highly skilled men and women who arrived in Canada and are not allowed to do what we were trained to do.” People who want to come to Canada are not told what to expect.

In the conference, a banker said, “When I applied, I had to qualify. There are marks for experience, education and so on. You have to get 70 marks. I got 72. When I came here, I found my degrees were worth nothing, useful only to work at a cold room. I left a banking job in Nigeria and here, though I was living in a foreign land, a dream of many years, I am not fulfilled.”

Also, a medical doctor said “I never knew it would be difficult to get a medical licence here. But I don’t know it would be such a bureaucratic, disheartening and, ultimately, fruitless journey. I sent my application to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons two and a half years ago, and I haven’t even received a response. I was worried my file might be lost in a drawer somewhere. I am ready to go anywhere, even rural Saskatchewan, small-town Ontario.

“After being certified a doctor in Nigeria, I got employment as a cleaner here. It’s so disturbing. Anytime some of the doctors here have a problem, they come to me for help.

They know what I can do, but to them, I have not obtained Canadian qualification. “I have been cleaning the hospital here, in fact, I have even been a babysitter,” she lamented. Another doctor at the meeting had once applied for a job as a health care worker. The answer was “sorry, you are overqualified.” The doctor then applied for work as a medical secretary and was told 30 words per minute wasn’t good enough and in any case, where is the diploma in secretarial skills? A final insult, the doctor could not get a job as a personal support worker: No experience, no qualifications.

Other foreign professionals in that country also have a taste of the experience. In their homelands, they are engineers, professors, doctors and business people. Now, they drive cabs.

Leon Kalemkerian

Leon Kalemkerian, an engineer in Iraq, drives a Limo in Toronto. “It takes no time for a dream to turn into a nightmare,” Kalemkerian said.

The electronics engineer, now 59, emigrated from Iraq in 1995 to provide a better life and more opportunities for his three children – and a job for himself. Kalemkerian has been driving Limousine for nine years. He said he tried everything possible to get his qualifications recognised in Canada. “I was told I have good work experience but I should have Canadian education,” Kalemkerian said. Even though he completed courses in Ethics and Law at the University of Toronto, that wasn’t enough.

Reza Hosseinioun

“Everything about Economics is fascinating,” says Mohammad Reza Hosseinioun. Hosseinioun, who goes by the name Reza, has a PhD in Economics and now drives a cab in Toronto. It’s not what he wanted to do but, for the lack of any choice, is what he was forced to do. Reza, 54, was born and raised in Mashad, Iran. In 1981, he went to India to study Economics at Bhopal University (now known as Barkatullah University Bhopal). He completed his PhD in 1988 after which he came to Canada and applied for refugee status. But in Canada, his dream fizzled.

Tejpal Bath

Days after graduation, Tejpal Bath was offered his dream job: living in a village and caring for cows, buffalo and horses. Bath, 35, was a veterinarian in northern India. In Canada, he drives a cab. Bath studied Veterinarian Sciences at Punjab Agricultural University in northern India, graduating in 1997 after five gruelling years. The work was satisfying. But in 2001, he visited his brother in Toronto and met some old friends. He returned home, opened a small animal clinic and applied for immigration at the same time. The clinic was doing well, but he and his wife decided to give Canada a try. They and their son, now nine, moved there in 2006. He took the first qualifying test for a veterinarian licence but didn’t pass. He drove a truck for a while. But it kept him away from his family so, two years ago, he decided to drive a cab.

Chamkaur Singh Dhaliwal

At 36, Chamkaur Singh Dhaliwal was the youngest professor of Agricultural Entomology at a university in northern India. About 17 years later, he is one of dozens of cabbies waiting for fares at Pearson airport. Dhaliwal joined as an assistant professor in the Department of Entomology at Punjab Agricultural University in Ludhiana, India, in 1980, becoming professor in 1996. It was a good life and Dhaliwal and his wife, Savinder, a school principal, were content. Two weeks after the family landed in Toronto, Dhaliwal went to the University of Guelph. His PhD was recognised, but he couldn’t find work. He opted to become a real estate agent. That went well until the market downslided. With a family to support and a mortgage to pay, Dhaliwal decided to drive a cab.

Additional information from www.notcanada.com
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by AloyEmeka9: 8:12am On Jun 01, 2009
Same problem BecomeRich, an Illorin trained electrical engineer is facing in Canada.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by AjaraEwuro: 8:56am On Jun 01, 2009
It is not a new thing, if you were a doctor in Nigeria and now a cleaner in Canada, then you must have your head examined, go for deliverance in a good church, pack your bags and head back home. You are an insult to yourself.

3 Likes

Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by Nobody: 9:12am On Jun 01, 2009
Iraqi engineer ke? He would have been bombed alongside his screwdriver and spanner if he wasnt taking refuge in a peaceful canada. Same with clueless nigerian dude who couldnt diagnose a common cold while in nigeria, is now making noise about being a cleaner.
Nobody is holding them hostage wherever they are. . . . . . they can still move back to their paradise. tongue

Why cant people leave becomrich and other people like him to keep suffering in their far away canada while those living in nigeria should continue to enjoy the "almighty heaven" in nigeria?
Is this complaints born out of jealousy, joblessness on the path of us that keep taking medication for another man's illness, or out of pure love for fellow countrymen?
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by ElRazur: 9:12am On Jun 01, 2009
Typical responses from like minded people. undecided

Here, how about a different view? Being a doctor in Nigeria do not automatically means you would become a doctor in a developed country. You just have to look at the state of our universities as to why. You need to look at our hospitals as to why. You need to see where Nigeria stands in these fields on the world platform to see why.

Just because Medicine is being taught in Nigerian universities, do not mean that the students [or product of Nigeria's university] are what people abroad want. To buttress my point, please check out the thread entitle "Are nigeria's graduate really graduate" in the career section.

Years ago, I used to work with some guy who apparently was a doctor in Nigeria. Even then with my college education back then, I would be very sceptical of his claim or knowledge base - but that is just me.

From what I know, people who came here in the 60s, 70s and up to the 80s are able to practice as a doctor, but now the system is changed - at least in the UK.  You will need to do several tests and other trainings so as to bring people from back home to the standards needed here. The thing is some do fail these tests and they sometimes find it a shock, as it is not the same learning process they are used to back home.

While my problem is not with the people with the qualification - i.e the doctors back home - I think my problem lies with the way our education system is being allowed to systematically fall apart.


Let me put it this way, it would be probably easier for me to get a job in Nigeria with my qualifications, than have qualifications from Nigeria's university and looking for jobs here. Why is that?

1 Like

Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by otokx(m): 9:26am On Jun 01, 2009
Is becomerich in canada?
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by oyb(m): 9:39am On Jun 01, 2009
My sis studied in nigeria, and she is practicing in NY right now. she had one of the highest scores in the accreditation exams ( i forget the name of the exams)

if you are a professional, it is better you migrate when you are young and still able to pass the relevent accreditation exams. end of story.

Same problem BecomeRich, an Illorin trained electrical engineer is facing in Canada.

abeg stop besmirching unilorin with that quack angry angry cheesy cheesy
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by spikedcylinder: 10:02am On Jun 01, 2009
So what are we supposed to be doing? Looking for the key to the shackles that tied his @ss down in Canada?
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by IKEYMAN1: 10:12am On Jun 01, 2009
becomerich!! u ve been exposed! lipsrsealed

grin
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by bgees(m): 11:04am On Jun 01, 2009
Our educational system is definately not the best.
But, people in other countries like australia and the U.K have better stories to tell.

In canada, u can only take the medical licensing exams 4 times. And if u fail the 4th time,u will not be allowed to take it again and that means u can never work in ur field never again.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by KnowAll(m): 12:38pm On Jun 01, 2009
The problem is people are migrating at the age of 37, 38 years or even later, by the time they settle down in the new country 2 years has passed by then u have young kids screeaming daddy I want this or that. With all that confusion and commotion going on at the background u want to study for some professional exams. By the time u pass the exams u will be competing against 21 and 22 old year kids who already have experience. Omo anything your eye see for abroad u just have to take it. It is our silly leaders that reduced us to such a pitiable state.

3 Likes

Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by blacksta(m): 12:47pm On Jun 01, 2009
I saw becomrich a fomer senior electrician in kwara state sweeping the streets of ontario

na wa o
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by dinggle: 1:04pm On Jun 01, 2009
This is an act of giving a failed state like Nigeria credit!, funny enough the doctor turned cleaner is not tied, pls come back if you dare, there are thousand of people waiting to take your place. e.g Politicians, ex-presidents and wasting professors. Yeye! after eating burger and enjoying uninterrupted power failure, decent road, decent police force without accidental discharge, decent transport system, unpoluted cities, you are complaining.

1 Like

Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by KnowAll(m): 1:19pm On Jun 01, 2009
This is an act of giving a failed state like Nigeria credit!, funny enough the doctor turned cleaner is not tied, pls come back if you dare, there are thousand of people waiting to take your place. e.g Politicians, ex-presidents and wasting professors. Yeye! after eating burger and enjoying uninterrupted power failure, decent road, decent police force without accidental discharge, decent transport system, unpoluted cities, you are complaining.


Yes I agree with u.[b][/b]

The fact is most Naijas want too much. Because we call these nations developed does not mean they still dont discriminate, they do it in a subtle way. When Naija was good, did we as a nation treat our fellow west africans equally as a Nigeria. Can a Ghanian compete equally for a job in Nigeria even most times people from different tribe are discriminated against in Nigeria. But when we come abroad we want to compete with oyinbos for their own country and to be fair to them they give a lot of us chance to compete fairly equally.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by labiyemmy(m): 1:22pm On Jun 01, 2009
ElRazur:

Typical responses from like minded people. undecided

Here, how about a different view? Being a doctor in Nigeria do not automatically means you would become a doctor in a developed country. You just have to look at the state of our universities as to why. You need to look at our hospitals as to why. You need to see where Nigeria stands in these fields on the world platform to see why.

Just because Medicine is being taught in Nigerian universities, do not mean that the students [or product of Nigeria's university] are what people abroad want. To buttress my point, please check out the thread entitle "Are nigeria's graduate really graduate" in the career section.

Years ago, I used to work with some guy who apparently was a doctor in Nigeria. Even then with my college education back then, I would be very sceptical of his claim or knowledge base - but that is just me.

From what I know, people who came here in the 60s, 70s and up to the 80s are able to practice as a doctor, but now the system is changed - at least in the UK.  You will need to do several tests and other trainings so as to bring people from back home to the standards needed here. The thing is some do fail these tests and they sometimes find it a shock, as it is not the same learning process they are used to back home.

While my problem is not with the people with the qualification - i.e the doctors back home - I think my problem lies with the way our education system is being allowed to systematically fall apart.


Let me put it this way, it would be probably easier for me to get a job in Nigeria with my qualifications, than have qualifications from Nigeria's university and looking for jobs here. Why is that?

Just a simple question? If the above in bold fonts are realy true, why do some of us still got all it takes to break into the UK market with our Nigerian degrees and still came out being the best everywhere we work or at whatever we do? Why did the UK govt recruit many people to work in Britain under the HSMP Visa if Nigerian Universities turn out poo?

If you graduate as a medical doctor in Nigeria and you go to where ever to mess up, chances are that you are not that good academically and professionally and it has nothing to do with the state of Nigerian Universities because if you search properly, you will come across loads of people graduating from the same University and doing marvelously well in other countries Worldwide, even in the same Canada.

1 Like

Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by MrCrackles(m): 1:28pm On Jun 01, 2009
Topic

Big deal, come and see former governor washing dead bodies in John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford!
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by KnowAll(m): 1:33pm On Jun 01, 2009
Just a simple question? If the above in bold fonts are realy true, why do some of us still got all it takes to break into the UK market with our Nigerian degrees and still came out being the best everywhere we work or at whatever we do? Why did the UK govt recruit many people to work in Britain under the HSMP Visa if Nigerian Universities turn out poo?

they want our money 90% of our politicians sons and daughters are either in the UK and the US studying and they pay top dollar. I live in a Uni Town in hertfordshire and I know want Nigerian parents are doing in my localty. They pay landlords 3 years rent to cover their kids schooling they also pay the uni for the 3 years duration of the course. We are talking £8,000.00 per academic year for the school and £10,000.00 a year for house and flats that are rented.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by toshacer: 1:37pm On Jun 01, 2009
KnowAll:


they want our money 90% of our politicians sons and daughters are either in the UK and the US studying and they pay top dollar. I live in a Uni Town in hertfordshire and I know want Nigerian parents are doing in my localty. They pay landlords 3 years rent to cover their kids schooling they also pay the uni for the 3 years duration of the course. We are talking £8,000.00 per academic year for the school and £10,000.00 a year for house and flats that are rented.

I dont get this in response to the previous posters?
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by Jakumo(m): 1:37pm On Jun 01, 2009
blacksta:

I saw becomrich a fomer senior electrician in kwara state sweeping the streets of ontario



All these gratuitous and cowardly insults against The Satellite Guru, BecomeRich will be addressed in the fullness of time, and you snickering disgruntled elements who have mistaken His silence for forgiveness will soon gnash your teeth and wail to no avail,  when His patience finally wears out and He is forced to respond with all the vested powers at His disposal.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by toshacer: 1:38pm On Jun 01, 2009
dinggle:

This is an act of giving a failed state like Nigeria credit!,  funny enough the doctor turned cleaner is not tied, pls come back if you dare, there are thousand of people waiting to take your place. e.g Politicians, ex-presidents and wasting professors. Yeye! after eating burger and enjoying uninterrupted power failure, decent road, decent police force without accidental discharge, decent transport system, unpoluted cities, you are complaining.


Stay there.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by AjaraEwuro: 1:42pm On Jun 01, 2009
A doctor turned a cleaner - who do you realy have to blame for that? Nigeria?
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by KnowAll(m): 1:45pm On Jun 01, 2009
I dont get this in response to the previous posters?


The Guy was asking if Nigerian Graduates are really graduates of course they are when it comes to u wanting to do a post graduate (Wont u pay for your PG ). But u present the same certificate for jobs in the UK or US or canada  you will be told that those qualification are not recognised.

Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by asha80(m): 1:46pm On Jun 01, 2009
MrCrackles:

Topic

Big deal, come and see former governor washing dead bodies in John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford!


shocked brash name names angry
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by Jakumo(m): 1:54pm On Jun 01, 2009
Please let us at least show some respect by referring to this doctor not as a " Cleaner" but a "Substrate Contaminant Evacuation Systems Director".
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by Jakumo(m): 2:03pm On Jun 01, 2009
Becomerich why has your post count gone down to 5, and the spelling of your name changed AGAIN ?

I KNOW you are not going to tell us that you got BANNED, AGAIN. This is an abomination that will deeply anger the spirits of the forest, if a couple of virgins are not sacrificed immediately.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by AjanleKoko: 2:08pm On Jun 01, 2009
Naija isn't the only country affected by the Canadian 'hand falling'.
I read once about a Pakistani chap who was a professor of wireless comms in the UK, but driving a cab in Canada.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by phantom(m): 2:24pm On Jun 01, 2009
@jakumo, I swear, U be nutcase, Lol
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by MrCrackles(m): 2:44pm On Jun 01, 2009
asha 80:

shocked brash name names angry

Hehehe!

It wont be fair so let me know lift the lid on it! grin

I was told and someone pointed him out, but i dont know the dude personally
undecided
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by Kobojunkie: 3:06pm On Jun 01, 2009
ElRazur:

Typical responses from like minded people. undecided

Here, how about a different view? Being a doctor in Nigeria do not automatically means you would become a doctor in a developed country. You just have to look at the state of our universities as to why. You need to look at our hospitals as to why. You need to see where Nigeria stands in these fields on the world platform to see why.

Just because Medicine is being taught in Nigerian universities, do not mean that the students [or product of Nigeria's university] are what people abroad want. To buttress my point, please check out the thread entitle "Are nigeria's graduate really graduate" in the career section.

Years ago, I used to work with some guy who apparently was a doctor in Nigeria. Even then with my college education back then, I would be very sceptical of his claim or knowledge base - but that is just me.

From what I know, people who came here in the 60s, 70s and up to the 80s are able to practice as a doctor, but now the system is changed - at least in the UK. You will need to do several tests and other trainings so as to bring people from back home to the standards needed here. The thing is some do fail these tests and they sometimes find it a shock, as it is not the same learning process they are used to back home.

While my problem is not with the people with the qualification - i.e the doctors back home - I think my problem lies with the way our education system is being allowed to systematically fall apart.


Let me put it this way, it would be probably easier for me to get a job in Nigeria with my qualifications, than have qualifications from Nigeria's university and looking for jobs here. Why is that?

Thank yoU!!
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by asha80(m): 3:15pm On Jun 01, 2009
Although Canada provides warm welcome to new immigrants, the job market behaves the opposite. The country tends to favour the ‘True Canadians’ who are your next generation offspring.

Food for thought.
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by AjaraEwuro: 3:23pm On Jun 01, 2009
Kobojunkie:

Thank yoU!!

Stay there all of you saying Nigerian graduates are not graduates?

Why are Nigerian graduates on this forum not taking on these non entities saying Nigerian graduaes are not graduates? Are you all attesting to the fact or agreeing to these non entities?
Re: I Was A Doctor In Nigeria, Now A Cleaner In Canada by AjanleKoko: 3:27pm On Jun 01, 2009
AjaraEwuro:

Stay there all of you saying Nigerian graduates are not graduates?

Why are Nigerian graduates on this forum not taking on these non entities saying Nigerian graduaes are not graduates? Are you all attesting to the fact or agreeing to these non entities?

It's a tired argument, in my view.

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