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The Wodaabe People - Culture (7) - Nairaland

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See The Fulani Wodaabe And Tuareg Kel-tamasheq Getting Along In Dance And Drum / Wodaabe Tribe & Fulani Tribe (1) (2) (3) (4)

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Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 8:54am On Aug 20, 2013
KidStranglehold: Its already been stated many times that Fulani's origins lie in the Sahara(like other West Africans), there is even rock arts of Fulanis in the Sahara when it was wet.


Heck Fulanis still mostly live near the Sahara.

I have already eastablished this fact.
And that is a hieroglyph from egypt lol.

My point exactly.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 9:25am On Aug 20, 2013
Fulani ethnic and inguistic population is thought to include linguistic population is thought to include up to as many as 15,000,000 and are up to as many as 15,000,000 and are normally called Felata or Fula, Peul, Pullo, and Fulbe. One peculiarity found among the lesser modified or "red Fulani", such as Wodaabe, who probably preserve to a great extent the original Fulani appearance and lifestyle was pointed out by Werner Herzog in his documentary "Herdsmen of the Sun", and that is there is a tendency to great height or stature...Apparently many of the men of the northern Fulani groups as with the Tuareg, frequently reach 7 feet in height and over, something historians tend to forget, or are not always aware of when assessing Fulani origins

Hmmmmmmm......

Many of the groups that today speak the Fulbe, Fulfulde or Pulaagu dialects are in fact a mixture of the original Fula or Fulitani and these various Songhai and Mande ethnic groups.

They are also associated with the people and place name Futa or Futabe. A good example of such groups are the Toucouleur, formed and perhaps named from the Takruri and Fulani who had come to occupy the region of Futa Toro and Futa Jallon. In the northern Sahel and Sahara Although the Fulani had been mainly vassals in the early Sudanic kingdoms of Songhai and Ghana, by the 1500s the Fulani were at Macina/Massina in the Middle Niger river region in Mali.

They are associated with coming to occupy Fulani were at Macina/Massina in the Middle Niger river region in Mali. They are associated with coming to occupy and dominate the Empire called Sokoto and kingdom of Bornu originally founded by peoples of Nilo-Saharan and Tuareg ethnicity

But they are Homogeneous tho. Lol.

Yet, in fact, the earliest Fulani were one of the few peoples for which there is an abundance of evidence for origins in The evidence is both archeological and anthropologica and tends to show that original Fulani population and tends to show that original Fulani population belonged to a group of neolithic pastoralists in the central and northern Sahara who were spread to Kharga, Kerma and possibly further east in Africa in later times.

A back migration east...
And also explains why the wodaabe travel the way they do.
They have always been familiar with that territory. wink

It goes on....

They appear to have been among the first people to be known to ancient Egyptians under the names Tjehenu or Temehou.

Their presence in stone age north Africa probably led to contact with other groups as far back as the late stone age which has led to their current so–called non-African features such as notably lengthy and less frizzly hair than other west African tribes and perhaps the introduction of a curvature to their innately narrow long noses.

Homogeneous tho. lol.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 9:30am On Aug 20, 2013
And odumchi...i may need u to unhide this next one too grin
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 9:40am On Aug 20, 2013
http://www.africanark.org/Fulani.html

As for the current linguistic situation of the Fulani, it should be noted that there are many peoples in Africa that over the past 2,000 years have adopted dialects foreign to their own that subsequently evolved into newer forms. This has happened for various reasons, often due to trade or immigration.

A good example is the current situation of North Africa where many groups of varied ethnicity and diverse biological origin over the last 2,000 years have adopted either the Arabic or Berber dialects and claim either Arabic or Berber origin or nationality today.

At one time Berbers themselves were said to have been largely "Romanized" while now it appears descendants of Romans, Vandals, Scythians, Central Asians and other peoples who have settled in North Africa (or have otherwise been brought in) have themselves been somewhat Berberized and Arabized through admixture and adopting of certain linguistic and cultural patterns and mores.

The Nilo-Saharans are an example of indigenous Africans who are known to have mixed with and adopted Niger-Congo dialects of the Atlantic branch, becoming the Sarakholle, Serer, Soninke, Djallonke, Jahanke and other groups now designated "Mande" or "Mandinke".

Thus, the fact that certain groups now speak a specific dialect doesn’t always say much about their cultural origins.

Furthermore, in many places there was a certain ethnic rivalry between Fulani and other groups as is common between more nomadic and more settled agricultural peoples in Africa. And these tensions (which haven’t completely disappeared in Africa since they were aggravated by European colonialist notions) in various regions was often attributed to "racial "differences between the "lighter-skinned" "nobles’ of "hamitic stock" and the so-called "black African"

Blah blah...ok my point was made. tongue
Im not gonna go into what white folks thought. Its irrelevant.

Anyway, later on...I will show the similarities btn the wodaabe and the ancient libyans which show they have a distinct ethnic origin in the north east sahara.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 9:52am On Aug 20, 2013

"Young Fulani (wodaabe) with traditional tattoos"


"A cartoonish rendition of the Libyans"
Notice the tats....


"Elaborate designs on the this Fulani young man's attire go back thousands of years"


"Women of the Fulani today continue to wear long side locks and ancient Saharan hairstyles"


"Libyan New Kingdom hairstyle"

Tjehenu man..

"Libyan or "Tjehenu" man from the Old Kingdom era of Egypt wears characteristic crossband"

Wodaabe..hmmmmmmm..

Modern wodaabe men wear characteristic"crossbands"
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 10:02am On Aug 20, 2013
Now read this hilarious attempt by eurocentrics who got caugh trying to steal tjehenu history....

Ancient "Libyans" with sidelocks as they exist on 19th dynasty tomb of Seti. Some early scholars were evidently misled by the portrayals of Libyans by the 19th century Richard Lepsius who in clear or perhaps all too clear, seems to have rendered the ancient Libyans of a particular tomb in a tint much lighter than they appeared Libyans of a particular tomb in a tint much lighter than they appeared in the actual painting.

Other scholars appear not to be aware that the ancient use of the term Tamahou or Tjemehou was originally used exclusively for the brown people of the Kharga and the other southern oases as (the name first appears in the 6th dynasty) and only much later for westerners in general including the rather mixed conglomeration of "Sea peoples".

Lol.

The above is probably an attempt by some Egyptologist to render the Libyans into the famous "Hamitic caucasoid of colonialist fantasy.

True to life painting from the New Kingdom dynasties of Egypt. Even with the dark paint brown paint fading from their skins and the black plaited hair and side locks, one sees their "true colors" and the African origins of these rather late Libyans are evident.

Another archeologist named Oric Bates, author of a foundational work known as, The Eastern Libyans, also commented on these hairstyle similarities saying"the Fulbe or Fulahs of the Chad-zone sometimes braid the hair in a manner which strikingly recalls the Libyans of the monuments" (Bates, 1914, p. 136).

Further, it was not only the hairstyles, but the complexion, the attire, hats feathers and designs in their costumes and tattoos, as well, which seemed to link them to certain of the early peoples settled in Libyan oases next to Egypt (in places like Kharga and Dakhla) and Nubia since Neolithic times.

Hmmmm looks like the egypt thread needs some updating tongue
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 10:02am On Aug 20, 2013
Specialist Marion von Offelen in the more recent Nomads of Niger noted resemblances in
the attire and clothing designs of the present Woodabe group of Fulani to tire and tattoo designs on the "Libyans" of 19th dynasty tomb paintings of Seti (Van Offelen & Beckwith, 1984, p. 177). The details of these elaborate designs are obviously too alike to be just coincidence.

MsDarkSkin:
"Elaborate designs on the this Fulani young man's attire go back thousands of years"



Elaborate designs on the this Fulani young man's attire go back thousands of years in Saharan art and ancient Egyptian potrayals of the New kingdom Libyans. The designs have a special significance. They have special significance, However what clinches the case is the well documented archaeological connection of the early people of the oases like Kharga and similar peoples in Nubia to some of the pastoral nomads in earlier eastern and central Saharan rock art of the Neolithic. Bates long ago noted that on Fulani garments were also the same designs that appear on the C group pottery of Kerma, (Bates, p. 251).

As well, archaeologist David Phillipson noted the archaeology of C-group pastoralists suggests a Saharan origin. (Phillipson, 1977, p.66). These connections are not only strong at Kharga and Wadi Howar, but at Tassili and Annadi, Tibesti, Air, Ahaggar/Hoggar, Jebel Uweinat, Gilf Kebir and Wadi Djerat where the paintings date back to the neolithic period known to art historians and archeologists as the "Bovidian" dating back to the 3rd and 4th millenniums B.C.

shocked shocked shocked
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 10:03am On Aug 20, 2013
Ancient inhabitants of Tassili in Algeria appear to sport the modern Fulani bun hairstyle. This is an area stretching from Algeria and Niger to Libya, Sudan, and Chad where cattle in rock art with horns artificially deformed and cattle pendants typical of those of the C-group population of Nubia, have been discovered. Gabriel Camps attributes these practices to C-group Nubian influence rather than vice versa. The two groups most characteristically associated with these paintings of Bovidian pastoralists, according to Camps, resemble the "tall" slender Fulani, and the smaller built populations called euphemistically brown or gracile Mediterranean man of Nubia (A and C-group), Egypt and the countries of the Horn i.e. the ancestors of many Nilo-Saharan, Afroasiatics or Cushitic-speakers. (Camps, 1982, pp. 574-575)
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 10:23am On Aug 20, 2013
Aside from Camps, numerous archeologists and rock art specialists of both European and African descent have noted that many elements in Fulani culture, from the type of huts to their current rituals and hair styles and profiles, seem to be depicted in some of the very early pastoralist art work of Saharan oases stretching into the Central Sahara.

The Fulani anthropologist, Amadou Hampate Ba and Germaine Dieterlen in the article, "The Frescos of the Bovidian epoch in Tassili n'Ajjer and Traditions of the Peul" thought they had identified similarities between rituals and ceremonies shown in some of the rock paintings and those practiced by certain of the Fulani of today[/b] (Hampate Ba & Dieterlen, 1966, pp. 151-157).

certain = wodaabe obviously lol.


J.Hiernaux, a noted specialist on ancient rock art or frescoes of neolithic Saharan pastoralists also expressed an opinion on this. He was struck by similarities of the crest headgear and bun hairstyle in pastoral rock art of the Hoggar and Tassili and those of Fulani men and women of Macina/Massina near the Niger.

hmmmm....

The large lyre shaped horns, so typical of the bovine figures, carvings and cave paintings are found especially in the [b]Bororo Fulani herds.


At Jabbaren where Bovidian rock art dates back to the 4th millennium the artists have depicted a practice maintained by the Fulani of transporting the armature of huts, and the head gear, cattle, clothing and most typical physical characteristics of human figures of the pastoral period resemble the present day Fulani. These were undoubtedly similar to the early people who first appeared in the Fayum as Tjehenu in the Old Kingdom.

More recently, scholars like J.L. Quellec in "Les Gravures Rupestre in Fezzan" have spoken of the numerous connections between C-group Nubians and ancient occupants of the Fezzan (Quellec, 1985, p. 373). These connections likely corroborate why ancient Libyans in Egyptian tomb paintings were found by Bates to wear tattoo designs similar to those present on C-group pottery.

Interestingly, modern Fulani also sport at times a hairstyle in which the hair is left long in the back and head shaved in the front, similar to the description of the hairstyle worn by the ancient Machlyes of ancient Libya who according to Herodotus spread to the river Triton in the Syrtic region.

cool cool cool cool cool
Re: The Wodaabe People by UyiIredia(m): 10:40am On Aug 20, 2013
MsDarkSkin:

Blah blah...ok my point was made. tongue
Im not gonna go into what white folks thought. Its irrelevant.

Anyway, later on...I will show the similarities btn the wodaabe and the ancient libyans which show they have a distinct ethnic origin in the north east sahara.

I see you ! Good job you're doing on this section cool

1 Like

Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 10:45am On Aug 20, 2013
Uyi Iredia:

I see you ! Good job you're doing on this section cool

Thanks dear. cool
Re: The Wodaabe People by UyiIredia(m): 10:46am On Aug 20, 2013
*Kails*:


Sir africa has changed a lot over the years.
Africans today were not as they were thousands of years ago. The fulani much like the akan is a collection of many african groups who share a culture but originally began as seperate clans. Migrations occurred a lot in west africa and caused people to fuse into larger groups. The same can be said for various other african ethnic groups all throughout the continent. This is nothing new. Lol

The fulani is no different. I,never said the term wodaabe was ancient...i said the people in that group are and they are not...i repeat NOT native to lle est africa. They are related to the tuareg who in turn have the same ancestry (with some foreign admixture) as the east and north east africans.

If u want me to provide proof I will gladly do so. But there is a reason why body wise and phenotypically the wodaabe looks different from other fulanis its because of their ancestry.

Its common sense. The fulanis are not all homogeneous. Lol.

I agree with this. No tribe is an island unto itself and they give to or incorporate elements of other tribes.

1 Like

Re: The Wodaabe People by Fulaman198(m): 8:03pm On Aug 20, 2013
*Kails*:


Sir africa has changed a lot over the years.
Africans today were not as they were thousands of years ago. The fulani much like the akan is a collection of many african groups who share a culture but originally began as seperate clans. Migrations occurred a lot in west africa and caused people to fuse into larger groups. The same can be said for various other african ethnic groups all throughout the continent. This is nothing new. Lol

The fulani is no different. I,never said the term wodaabe was ancient...i said the people in that group are and they are not...i repeat NOT native to lle est africa. They are related to the tuareg who in turn have the same ancestry (with some foreign admixture) as the east and north east africans.

If u want me to provide proof I will gladly do so. But there is a reason why body wise and phenotypically the wodaabe looks different from other fulanis its because of their ancestry.

Its common sense. The fulanis are not all homogeneous. Lol.

All groups start of homogeneous, that is how languages and culture are created. The Yoruba for example remained homogeneous. If there were no homogeneity, then we wouldn't have the same language and culture. Ask any Fulani from Senegal, Mauritania, Niger and Chad, they will say the same thing. We are not in clans but different Fulani groups country to country, like the Fulbe Jeeri far west or different Mbororo groups further east.

1 Like

Re: The Wodaabe People by KidStranglehold: 8:13pm On Aug 20, 2013
*Kails*:


I have already eastablished this fact.
And that is a hieroglyph from egypt lol.

My point exactly.

I know. Just speaking in general.

Could have sworn that was a rock art. I know there are many rock arts in the Sahara that possibly depicts the ancestors of the Fulanis.
Re: The Wodaabe People by KidStranglehold: 8:15pm On Aug 20, 2013
Fulaman198:

All groups start of homogeneous, that is how languages and culture are created. The Yoruba for example remained homogeneous. If there were no homogeneity, then we wouldn't have the same language and culture. Ask any Fulani from Senegal, Mauritania, Niger and Chad, they will say the same thing. We are not in clans but different Fulani groups country to country, like the Fulbe Jeeri far west or different Mbororo groups further east.

YEP! Berbers too are not a homogeneous group, but we all know that proto-Berbers originated in Northeast Africa(possibly Sudan, Egypt or Southeast Libya).
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 8:24pm On Aug 20, 2013
Fulaman198:

All groups start of homogeneous, that is how languages and culture are created. The Yoruba for example remained homogeneous. If there were no homogeneity, then we wouldn't have the same language and culture. Ask any Fulani from Senegal, Mauritania, Niger and Chad, they will say the same thing. We are not in clans but different Fulani groups country to country, like the Fulbe Jeeri far west or different Mbororo groups further east.

Lol come on son.
You can fight it all you want but the fact remains, youre one in terms of culture and language but your origins are not the same. That is my point. That is the fact.

All cultures do have distinct starting points...but we are humans and social beings...africans in particular NEVER stayed put all the time (until recently) and as a result you saw mixing, conquering and fusing of cultures.

This is common sense.

And dont get me started on yoruba. I will call my boy shymmex in here and he will explain how they conquered many ppls who now share similar cultures as a result. Lol.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 8:29pm On Aug 20, 2013
Uyi Iredia:

I agree with this. No tribe is an island unto itself and they give to or incorporate elements of other tribes.

Exactly. The idea that africa's native demographics always looked they way it does today is comical to say the least. Lol

Waaaay too much happened for everyone to have been secluded all through the centuries. Its insulting that I am supposed to believe otherwise when its common sense that a continent that had sooo many empires and kingdoms that there is no way its ppls always remained the same.

Warfare, alliances, trade and even the spreading of religion (islam) are key factors in why you have africans of various origins who share a single identity.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Fulaman198(m): 8:59pm On Aug 20, 2013
MsDarkSkin:

Lol come on son.
You can fight it all you want but the fact remains, youre one in terms of culture and language but your origins are not the same. That is my point. That is the fact.

All cultures do have distinct starting points...but we are humans and social beings...africans in particular NEVER stayed put all the time (until recently) and as a result you saw mixing, conquering and fusing of cultures.

This is common sense.

And dont get me started on yoruba. I will call my boy shymmex in here and he will explain how they conquered many ppls who now share similar cultures as a result. Lol.

What I'm saying is fact, a group can not be randomly formed. Arabs are an example, there were once few Arabs, their numbers started to grow and they dispersed to different parts of the world. Fulani were not always nomads. We started of as one group then diverged into many.

All British or English native speakers are of Anglo origin. All Fulani are of Senegambian origin. If they are not, then they can not be classified as Fulani. All Igbos came from the same forefathers. The same with MY people. To say that Yoruba's, Hausa's, Fulani, Igbos, Edo's, TIV, etc came from different origins doesn't make sense. How would the people speak the same language and have the same culture?
Re: The Wodaabe People by KidStranglehold: 9:09pm On Aug 20, 2013
@Fulaniman

Did you read my post to you on page 6?

@Kails/MsDarkskin

Can you stop saying Fulanis are a heterogeneous group. Neither does it help your argument nor does it make sense. You say Fulanis have different origins? Thats like saying Berbers descent from Europe, since there are some Berbers that cluster more with Europeans...But thats not the case since we already know the proto-Berbers came from Northeast Africa. Yes Fulanis are a heterogeneous group, but have you heard of something called assimilation? Bantu people are not a homogeneous, yet we know the ORIGINAL Bantus came from West Africa(Cameroon/Nigeria). The ORIGINAL proto Fulani came from the Sahara while the actual Fulanis most likely came from the Senegambian area. Like Fulaman said all groups start of homogeneous.

1 Like

Re: The Wodaabe People by Fulaman198(m): 9:21pm On Aug 20, 2013
KidStranglehold: @Fulaniman

Did you read my post to you on page 6?

@Kails/MsDarkskin

Can you stop saying Fulanis are a heterogeneous group. Neither does it help your argument nor does it make sense. You say Fulanis have different origins? Thats like saying Berbers descent from Europe, since there are some Berbers that cluster more with Europeans...But thats not the case since we already know the proto-Berbers came from Northeast Africa. Yes Fulanis are a heterogeneous group, but have you heard of something called assimilation? Bantu people are not a homogeneous, yet we know the ORIGINAL Bantus came from West Africa(Cameroon/Nigeria). The ORIGINAL proto Fulani came from the Sahara while the actual Fulanis most likely came from the Senegambian area. Like Fulaman said all groups start of homogeneous.

100% true, today Fulani are heterogeneous, but not when we first began.
Re: The Wodaabe People by KidStranglehold: 9:23pm On Aug 20, 2013
Fulaman198:

100% true, today Fulani are heterogeneous, but not when we first began.

Again like you said groups start out homogeneous.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 9:25pm On Aug 20, 2013
Fulaman I dont think you understand my point.
this thread is about the wodaabe.

And I am saying although they identify as fulani TODAY this was not always the case...got it? My thread is about one group of fulani ppl who have origins outside of the west african region...ok?

Good.
Re: The Wodaabe People by KidStranglehold: 9:28pm On Aug 20, 2013
MsDarkSkin: Fulaman I dont think you understand my point.
this thread is about the wodaabe.

And I am saying although they identify as fulani TODAY this was not always the case...got it? My thread is about one group of fulani ppl who have origins outside of the west african region...ok?

Good.

Sorry for being a contribution in ruining your thread. But it seems the Wodaabe were assimilated into the Fulani culture. Like some non African groups were assimilated into the Berber culture.

Thats what it appears to me.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Fulaman198(m): 9:53pm On Aug 20, 2013
What you are saying doesn't make sense. The Wodaabe are nomadic. They just kept the Fulani culture the purest. If anything they are the original Fulani. They have the most pure Fulani blood and culture only practiced by my Mbororos today. They never assimilated. They are not Berber, they are Fulani. I know 40 Wodaabe people living not far from me. They keep the Fulani culture most pure.

It is well known that Fulani culture was what Mbororo Fulani are still practicing today. Fulani culture I'd based on a caste system. Mboro are considered Rimaybe those born to bush culture. While nobles are Rimbe. Again, you are wrong.
Re: The Wodaabe People by KidStranglehold: 9:54pm On Aug 20, 2013
I never said the Wodaabe were Berbers. Where did you get that from?
Re: The Wodaabe People by Fulaman198(m): 10:02pm On Aug 20, 2013
The only group of people ever integrated into Fulani culture are the Tukulor (Toucouleur) of Senegal and Mauritania. They are not officially Fulani by blood, but are considered Fula today because of integrated language and culture.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 1:26am On Aug 21, 2013
im not going to argue with you fula lol
I have posted my evidence and that's that.

we will agree to disagree.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Fulaman198(m): 1:46am On Aug 21, 2013
MsDarkSkin: im not going to argue with you fula lol
I have posted my evidence and that's that.

we will agree to disagree.

It's not really evidence as many African ethnic groups have similar means of dress
Re: The Wodaabe People by Adamskuty(m): 6:57am On Aug 21, 2013
*Kails*:


Three things:

1 Thank you for the compliment.

2 I am not bantu (directly). You are not bantu. Bantus are not found in west africa....it is a central african language group.

3 the topic is called BEAUTY OF NATURAL HAIR which is located in thr fashion section. It features natural black women from all over the world.
so hmmm! What am i swrry Reply with a soft kiss pls cheesy
Re: The Wodaabe People by Adamskuty(m): 7:00am On Aug 21, 2013
MsDarkSkin: im not going to argue with you fula lol
I have posted my evidence and that's that.

we will agree to disagree.
don't argue with the true son of a fulani,u can't know better than him undecided
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 10:58am On Aug 21, 2013
^^that is actually a not so bright thing to say. That is like me telling a man he cannot tell me what a menstrual cycle is. Lol some men know about the process better than some women who actually goes through it.

I have provided evidence backing my claims. Its either some folks cant read or they did not read. But like I told him, I am telling you, this is not up for debate so kill the argument.

Im not debating with anyone dude, so move on.
Re: The Wodaabe People by Nobody: 10:59am On Aug 21, 2013
Adamskuty: so hmmm! What am i swrry Reply with a soft kiss pls cheesy

And furthermore, you did not even know west africans are not bantu lmaooooo Yall killing me. grin

Anyway, if you dont mind me asking what is your tribal affiliation/ethnic group?

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