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African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots - Culture - Nairaland

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African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 9:28pm On Mar 31, 2011
I am simply creating this thread to stress the need for African-Americans to go back to their Igbo roots. As we all know, even though many African groups were enslaved and sent to America, the majority of them sent to the United States were Igbos.

Therefore, I see the need for African-Americans to go back to their Igbo roots. We Igbos have not forgotten about our kin who were taken and sent to a foreign shore.

And I am happy that some African-Americans have taken the steps and are going back to their ancestral Igbo roots.

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Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 9:29pm On Mar 31, 2011


Joyous Chiefs: Chief Forest Whitaker, Nwannedinamba of Nkwerre land, and Chief Danny Glover, Enyioma of Nkwerre land, Imo State, Nigeria, in Igbo signature and peculiar cultural chieftaincy attire dancing to the traditional music after their conferment at the Eshi of Nkwerre Palace on Sunday, April 5, 2009.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 9:30pm On Mar 31, 2011


Chief Forest Whitaker, Nwannedinamba of Nkwerre land & Chief Danny Glover, Enyioma of Nkwerre land, Imo State, Nigeria after their conferment with chieftaincy titles at the palace of Eshi of Nkwerre on Sunday, April 5, 2009.

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Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 9:31pm On Mar 31, 2011




Chief Forest S. Whitaker, Nwannedinamba of Nkwerre land, and Chief Danny L. Glover, Enyioma of Nkwerre land exchanging signature and peculiar Igbo customary chieftaincy greeting
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 9:33pm On Mar 31, 2011
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Afam4eva(m): 9:36pm On Mar 31, 2011
So many African Americans are embracing their root e.g Forest Whitaker, Danny Glover, Wesley Snipes etc. It's just a matter of time.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 9:49pm On Mar 31, 2011
afam4eva:

So many African Americans are embracing their root e.g Forest Whitaker, Danny Glover, Wesley Snipes etc. It's just a matter of time.

It is just a matter of time when we will have added them to the Igbo race. I see a bright future for us all.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by ChinenyeN(m): 10:09pm On Mar 31, 2011
I guess its just me who doesn't share this sentiment. . .

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Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by ADM1(m): 10:26pm On Mar 31, 2011
I agree with your sentiment, EzeUche, but I'm sure Igbos were sent to other European colonies in the Western Hemisphere besides British North America, now called United States. What about African descendants in South America and the Caribbean? I'm sure some of them are of Igbo descent.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Nobody: 10:43pm On Mar 31, 2011
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Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 1:00am On Apr 01, 2011
ChinenyeN:

I guess its just me who doesn't share this sentiment. . .

My [b]IGBO [/b]brother, why do you not share this sentiment. I await you insight into the matter.

A.D.M.:

I agree with your sentiment, EzeUche, but I'm sure Igbos were sent to other European colonies in the Western Hemisphere besides British North America, now called United States. What about African descendants in South America and the Caribbean? I'm sure some of them are of Igbo descent.

Of course Igbos were sent to other European colonies such as Jamaica, Bahamas and Belize. I haven't forgot about them either. However, in this thread, I am just going to target African-Americans who are mostly descended from Igbos.

As you may already know, Igbos who come to the U.S. have an easier time blending in with African-Americans, because we all look the same for the most part. Instead of African-Americans focusing on that sankofa journey with the Akan people, they should focus on coming to Alaigbo (Igboland), where they will be embraced and given new names.

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Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Thirst4Lif: 2:33am On Apr 01, 2011
I am simply creating this thread to stress the need for African-Americans to go back to their Igbo roots.

How do you propose African Americans do this? Are you saying they should go to Africa?
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 3:06am On Apr 01, 2011
Thirst4Lif:

How do you propose African Americans do this? Are you saying they should go to Africa?

Africa is such a large continent, let us be more specific. I propose they travel to Igboland, and that Igbo culture and language should be taught in schools where African Americans attend. Now that is going back to your roots. I don't understand why some schools teach Kiswahili, even though East Africa has nothing to do with the Atlantic Slave Trade.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Chyz2: 4:13am On Apr 01, 2011
EzeUche:

Africa is such a large continent, let us be more specific. I propose they travel to Igboland, and that Igbo culture and language should be taught in schools where African Americans attend. Now that is going back to your roots. I don't understand why some schools teach Kiswahili, even though East Africa has nothing to do with the Atlantic Slave Trade.

I have always wondered the same thing.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Nobody: 5:15pm On Apr 01, 2011
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Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by ChinenyeN(m): 8:31pm On Apr 01, 2011
EzeUche:

My [b]IGBO [/b]brother

EzeUche:

why do you not share this sentiment. I await you insight into the matter.
I just don't particularly see why I should. To me, there simply exists a rift between worlds. So, that sense of association just isn't there for me.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Nobody: 8:44pm On Apr 01, 2011
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Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by ezeagu(m): 2:12pm On Apr 02, 2011
EzeUche:

Africa is such a large continent, let us be more specific. I propose they travel to Igboland, and that Igbo culture and language should be taught in schools where African Americans attend. Now that is going back to your roots. I don't understand why some schools teach Kiswahili, even though East Africa has nothing to do with the Atlantic Slave Trade.



1. The Igbo people are too reserved and have deliberately failed to promote their culture like that of other cultures African Americans run to when looking to Africa.

2. African Americans are looking for cultures that created empires and that are legitimised by European historians (where they get Africa's history) because their systems were similar to Europe's in that stage. If you say the Igbo did not have an empire, they will be turned off because they have nothing to rub in the face of the descendants of those who oppressed them. This is why African Americans focus on Ghana and other select parts of Africa, European stories.

3. Because of the reason above, the Igbo culture was not included in the 1970's African cultural revival, where cultures like the Akan, Yoruba, Mandinka and Kiswahili language and sometimes Kongo culture were focused on. The African Americans were looking for images of black power, and what better than an African emperor? Mansa Musa, Queen Nzinga, Ya Asantewa, etc.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Thirst4Lif: 10:54pm On Apr 02, 2011
Africa is such a large continent, let us be more specific. I propose they travel to Igboland, and that Igbo culture and language should be taught in schools where African Americans attend. Now that is going back to your roots. I don't understand why some schools teach Kiswahili, even though East Africa has nothing to do with the Atlantic Slave Trade.


I understand, thank you for your response. The only problem is how would African American's determine whether
they are descendants from Igbo or any other tribe. I won't try to speak for all African Americans, but I'll say a
great many only consider the continent of Africa itself, not it's make up. But as you stated that lack of
knowledge only reflects a lack of teaching. Or a lack of caring on the African American's part.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Thirst4Lif: 10:57pm On Apr 02, 2011
1. The Igbo people are too reserved and have deliberately failed to promote their culture like that of other cultures African Americans run to when looking to Africa.

2. African Americans are looking for cultures that created empires and that are legitimised by European historians (where they get Africa's history) because their systems were similar to Europe's in that stage. If you say the Igbo did not have an empire, they will be turned off because they have nothing to rub in the face of the descendants of those who oppressed them. This is why African Americans focus on Ghana and other select parts of Africa, European stories.

3. Because of the reason above, the Igbo culture was not included in the 1970's African cultural revival, where cultures like the Akan, Yoruba, Mandinka and Kiswahili language and sometimes Kongo culture were focused on. The African Americans were looking for images of black power, and what better than an African emperor? Mansa Musa, Queen Nzinga, Ya Asantewa, etc.

Very insightful post. Thank you. One of the most interesting threads I'm come across on Nairaland.com thus far!
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 12:59am On Apr 03, 2011
ezeagu:

1. The Igbo people are too reserved and have deliberately failed to promote their culture like that of other cultures African Americans run to when looking to Africa.

2. African Americans are looking for cultures that created empires and that are legitimised by European historians (where they get Africa's history) because their systems were similar to Europe's in that stage. If you say the Igbo did not have an empire, they will be turned off because they have nothing to rub in the face of the descendants of those who oppressed them. This is why African Americans focus on Ghana and other select parts of Africa, European stories.

3. Because of the reason above, the Igbo culture was not included in the 1970's African cultural revival, where cultures like the Akan, Yoruba, Mandinka and Kiswahili language and sometimes Kongo culture were focused on. The African Americans were looking for images of black power, and what better than an African emperor? Mansa Musa, Queen Nzinga, Ya Asantewa, etc.

How are you my brother? I am glad you wrote this post. As the previous poster above me said, this is very insightful.

However, it is not like many African Americans do not know that they are descendants of the Ndigbo. Many historians in the the United States, Europe and Africa believe the majority of African Americans are descendants of Igbos. Remember that we do have an Igbo Village in Virginia.

It might be a slow process, but hopefully, Igbos will be able to reunite with our long lost brothers across the Atlantic. We need to do this. Many African Americans are searching for their roots, and we Igbos should welcome them with open arms. Slavery was a horrible event that has stained our continent. My people bear the burden for this travesty, and I would hope that we in some way can make amends for what our ancestors have done.

Let us export our culture to African Americans. Yes, we may not have had empires or large kingdoms compared to the Ashanti, Yoruba, Woloof or Mandinka, but we have a very rich cultural heritage.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 1:06am On Apr 03, 2011
Thirst4Lif:

I understand, thank you for your response. The only problem is how would African American's determine whether
they are descendants from Igbo or any other tribe. I won't try to speak for all African Americans, but I'll say a
great many only consider the continent of Africa itself, not it's make up. But as you stated that lack of
knowledge only reflects a lack of teaching. Or a lack of caring on the African American's part.

My long lost brother, as you can see, some of us are willing to extend our arms to help our long lost brothers and sisters reunite with their cultural heritage. It must be done, because many African Americans I have talked to, wished they cold have definite point on their map to say where there ancestors came from. I think that is what led Alex Haley to create Roots and talk about his ancestors.

It is time for us to increase this knowledge of the African continent. Frankly, many Africans do not know the many ethnicities within their own countries, let alone Africa as a whole. If you say Southern Africa to a Nigerian, he may only have heard of one group from that region such as the Zulu. Let alone the other ethnicities such as the Xhosa, Basotho and Swazi. And knowledge of East Africa ethnicities is lacking among West Africans. How many Nigerians have heard the Luo, Kikuyu or Massai. You understand what I am trying to say?

You can help spread the word. As you can see, some of your comrades went back to Igboland to find their roots, let your cousins, your friends and your neighbors that many Igbos will welcome you all back with open arms. Bear our names, embrace our culture and learn our customs and you all will be accepted back.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Nobody: 1:10am On Apr 03, 2011
EzeUche:

How are you my brother? I am glad you wrote this post. As the previous poster above me said, this is very insightful.

However, it is not like many African Americans do not know that they are descendants of the Ndigbo. Many historians in the the United States, Europe and Africa believe the majority of African Americans are descendants of Igbos. Remember that we do have an Igbo Village in Virginia.

It might be a slow process, but hopefully, Igbos will be able to reunite with our long lost brothers across the Atlantic. We need to do this. Many African Americans are searching for their roots, and we Igbos should welcome them with open arms. Slavery was a horrible event that has stained our continent. My people bear the burden for this travesty, and I would hope that we in some way can make amends for what our ancestors have done.

Let us export our culture to African Americans. Yes, we may not have had empires or large kingdoms compared to the Ashanti, Yoruba, Woloof or Mandinka, but we have a very rich cultural heritage.

SOME of us are of Nigerian descent NOT MOST. there were 7 plus 'present day' countries the contributed to the slave trade, not just one. BTW I really appreciate what you said in the complaints thread. smiley Thank you wink.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 1:25am On Apr 03, 2011
MzDarkSkin:

SOME of us are of Nigerian descent NOT MOST. there were 7 plus 'present day' countries the contributed to the slave trade, not just one. BTW I really appreciate what you said in the complaints thread.  smiley Thank you  wink.

It has been estimated that 60% of African Americans are descendants of Igbos. If your ancestry can be traced to Virginia or Maryland, most likely you are of Igbo descent.

What I am tired of seeing is that African Americans always go to Ghana to trace their roots. Why not come to Nigeria? The Bight of Biafra was the major source of slaves for the English colonies. Why not come to the Bight of Biafra, which is in Eastern Nigeria?

And your welcome, I seen that he has been causing havoc with others, so I had to lend my support.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by ezeagu(m): 4:14pm On Apr 03, 2011
EzeUche:

What I am tired of seeing is that African Americans always go to Ghana to trace their roots. Why not come to Nigeria? The Bight of Biafra was the major source of slaves for the English colonies. Why not come to the Bight of Biafra, which is in Eastern Nigeria?

Because Ghana is more stable than Nigeria, and they have more knowledge of Akan culture, etc. They also have links with their people already there and Ghana has been open about giving them land and inviting them, Nigeria hasn't ever said anything slavery, all the old slave ports are ignored, and there has been no invitation.

1 Like

Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by paris10: 6:18pm On Apr 03, 2011
EzeUche:

My [b]IGBO [/b]brother, why do you not share this sentiment. I await you insight into the matter.


@Ezeuche, I see you're a typical traditionalist, and a tone of being a tribalist appears virtually in all your posts. I also notice that whenever someone posted something without mentioning IGBO, you immediately add the word in your next post.

No one is arguing with your sentiment or passion, but trade softly. You might even end up hating other tribes without you knowing it. And as long as these people (AA) are not identifying with your sentiment, there's little you can do. Being an AA who descends from your acclaimed tribe is not a big deal, and identifying oneself with the IGBO tribe is the same thing as identifying with slavery.

To burst your bubble, AA are the most crime prone people on the planet. Saying they should start retracing their root to the IGBO land and not Nigeria is actually a good thing to the rest of other tribes in Nigeria. This will mean more homicide and crime related activity in IGBO land and less worry for Nigerians. wink

1 Like

Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by saiyaman: 8:38pm On Apr 04, 2011
paris10:

@Ezeuche, I see you're a typical traditionalist, and a tone of being a tribalist appears virtually in all your posts. I also notice that whenever someone posted something without mentioning IGBO, you immediately add the word in your next post.

No one is arguing with your sentiment or passion, but trade softly. You might even end up hating other tribes without you knowing it. And as long as these people (AA) are not identifying with your sentiment, there's little you can do. Being an AA who descends from your acclaimed tribe is not a big deal, and identifying oneself with the IGBO tribe is the same thing as identifying with slavery.

To burst your bubble, AA are the most crime prone people on the planet. Saying they should start retracing their root to the IGBO land and not Nigeria is actually a good thing to the rest of other tribes in Nigeria. This will mean more homicide and crime related activity in IGBO land and less worry for Nigerians. wink

What kind of nonsense is that? By your logic, Nigerians should be the most corrupt minded people on the planet? Generalizations suck period.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Thirst4Lif: 1:28am On Apr 14, 2011
@Ezeuche, I see you're a typical traditionalist, and a tone of being a tribalist appears virtually in all your posts. I also notice that whenever someone posted something without mentioning IGBO, you immediately add the word in your next post.

No one is arguing with your sentiment or passion, but trade softly. You might even end up hating other tribes without you knowing it. And as long as these people (AA) are not identifying with your sentiment, there's little you can do. Being an AA who descends from your acclaimed tribe is not a big deal, and identifying oneself with the IGBO tribe is the same thing as identifying with slavery.

To burst your bubble, AA are the most crime prone people on the planet. Saying they should start retracing their root to the IGBO land and not Nigeria is actually a good thing to the rest of other tribes in Nigeria. This will mean more homicide and crime related activity in IGBO land and less worry for Nigerians.

Nonsense!
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Sincere08(f): 2:48am On Apr 14, 2011
As an African American I really appreciate your concern and warmth. It is nice to see that people really do understand that we are of African descent. I am saddened that more African Americans aren't concerned about embracing african culture. I have had friends that have said to me, " i'm not African American i'm Black American. I don't know anything about Africa and being American is fine with me." Such ignorance!

There are many African Americans who are interested though, and do not necessarily search for a connection to Ghana. Many African Americans would be happy to be apart of any country. Thanks again smiley

1 Like

Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by EzeUche(m): 2:24pm On Apr 14, 2011
Sincere08:

As an African American I really appreciate your concern and warmth. It is nice to see that people really do understand that we are of African descent. I am saddened that more African Americans aren't concerned about embracing african culture. I have had friends that have said to me, " i'm not African American i'm Black American. I don't know anything about Africa and being American is fine with me." Such ignorance!

There are many African Americans who are interested though, and do not necessarily search for a connection to Ghana. Many African Americans would be happy to be apart of any country. Thanks again smiley

No problem! cheesy

I believe that African Americans and Igbos should reconnect.

In the U.S., many people say I look African American and I always remind them that many African Americans are descendants of Igbos. If you look at Igbo celebrities, you can see resemblances with famous African Americans. Look at the Nigerian artist, P Square and see how Usher reseembles them.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by amor4ce(m): 3:30am On Apr 16, 2011
Carry out DNA Ancestry tests before coming out to make a general statement claiming all African Americans as Igbo descendants. Why do you want to associate yourselves with the shameful episode of slavery instead of apologizing to them. Was Igbo land part of the slave coast? Have you forgotten that many slaves were taken from Yoruba states which was made easier by the intra-tribal warfares going on there at that time? Your people have the financial muscle to carry out unbiased genetic, linguistic and archeological research into your ancestry/origin/peculiarities and use same to reconnect with your "lost" kin rather than bathe in conjectures and fables. You have the resources, do it right and objectively.
Re: African-Americans And Their Igbo Roots by Nobody: 1:03am On Apr 19, 2011
amor4ce:

Carry out DNA Ancestry tests before coming out to make a general statement claiming all African Americans as Igbo descendants. Why do you want to associate yourselves with the shameful episode of slavery instead of apologizing to them. Was Igbo land part of the slave coast? Have you forgotten that many slaves were taken from Yoruba states which was made easier by the intra-tribal warfares going on there at that time? Your people have the financial muscle to carry out unbiased genetic, linguistic and archeological research into your ancestry/origin/peculiarities and use same to reconnect with your "lost" kin rather than bathe in conjectures and fables. You have the resources, do it right and objectively.
cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool



EzeUche:

It has been estimated that 60% of African Americans are descendants of Igbos. If your ancestry can be traced to Virginia or Maryland, most likely you are of Igbo descent.

What I am tired of seeing is that African Americans always go to Ghana to trace their roots. Why not come to Nigeria? The Bight of Biafra was the major source of slaves for the English colonies. Why not come to the Bight of Biafra, which is in Eastern Nigeria?

And your welcome, I seen that he has been causing havoc with others, so I had to lend my support.


I am of African American and Jamaican descent. Both sides have a significant amount of Igbo roots however we cannot forget about Senegal, Ghana, the Kongo, Benin, Togo, Ivory Coast, Cameroon and Angola who have all contributed to the slave trade.  I have all of the above in my blood  smiley or heritage.

You are right that Nigeria contributed the most however the reason we reach out to and invest in/move to Ghana is because they are the most inviting. Ghana, apart from the 'first world countries' and Panama/Costa Rica, has the highest number of Jamaican nationals/descendants who have settled abroad living outside of Jamaica there, Rita Marley being one of them. Even in Jamaica where we are CLEARLY a mix of Igbo (a little Yoruba), Ashanti and various Congolese tribes each contributing to the culture (Igbo and Akan/Ashanti being the two biggest influences) we still have more of a sense of connection with our Ghanaian roots. The way we are taught is like Nigeria was much more ruthless and cold in regards to sending us away so there is a lot of resentment as far as Nigeria goes despite the fact that most of our heritage began with a walk from the N. Delta to Badagry. There doesn't seem to be an interest in us when it comes to Nigerians which is why we avoid Nigeria on a larger scale.

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